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Spoof: "How to be a real man!"

Callistemon

Part-Time Space Alien
V.I.P Member
In case anyone hasn't seen this delicious spoof about male stereotypes, I wanted to post it here.


Any reactions to that, from the males present especially? Anything that tickles you? Anything you want to relate about this general topic?
 
Ron Swanson knows how to be a man. I don't think he'd agree with long hair on a man

swanson-pyramid-of-greatness-1900x1200.png
 
I was surprised an obligatory obsession with your sport of choice wasn't included which you then primarily treat as an excuse for celebrity gossip and a reason to hate others. Maybe more of a European thing?
 
I was surprised an obligatory obsession with your sport of choice wasn't included which you then primarily treat as an excuse for celebrity gossip and a reason to hate others. Maybe more of a European thing?

Also a very Australian thing. Exactly as you describe, and also used to create a "superclass" of people to whom ordinary rules don't apply...
 
Yeah Australia is a very macho culture. Atleast I get the impression from years of cultural dissemination I've been exposed to.

I have a grand uncle who looks like Crocodile Dundee. He fits most the macho stereotypes lampooned in this video. Military guy.
 
Ron Swanson knows how to be a man. I don't think he'd agree with long hair on a man

swanson-pyramid-of-greatness-1900x1200.png

Oooh look, he's mean-mugging! :grin:

I have no idea who he is, which is probably a good thing. He seems to have a third eyebrow that's come down for a drink...

Very funny stuff in that pyramid, and it kinda reminds me of:

female-brain-male-brain.jpg
 
I want to point out a few things. If someone made a video like that about women, it would not be tolerated. Some would rage about it and others would be forced to appologize.

And as a man, it's strange to see that so many people are trying to convince us men that masculinity is toxic. It's something negative. It's poison, it's bad for us and everyone else, they say.

We're men, we are born with masculinity. So how can that be wrong. And what are we supposed to do? I don't think people understand how much this affects men in negative ways. People are now trying to train us, like dogs. Change who and what we are. We're now constantly being told that we are wrong and toxic and we must change. I not taking part in that. I'm a normal and decent man, I'm not hurting anyone and I'm not changing. And I'm keeping my masculinity.

Valid point.

How much of it is geometric echo blow back from the historical 'feminine ideal', (which let's face it folks borders on toxic feminity. Passivity and submissiveness, being the desire personality traits.)

e.g. total reliance on a man because the female is incapable or too weak to cope. Damsel in distress. Often called the second sex or weaker sex.

Even romance authors steer clear of the historical archetype because these vapid Mary Sues are perfect in all ways and have no wit, opinion, resources, or resiliency to address any type of problem. In short, they are zombie level passive and creepy. This is a protagonist type readers cannot tolerate.

Same is true with male leads in romance novels. They are not the stereotype. They are conscious human beings with alpha tendencies that are balanced with compromise, even when it is against the grain.

Consciousness of the individual is the middle ground. Not the black and white checklist of assumed gender rolls.

Want to really understand women, read a romance novel.
 
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People are now trying to train us, like dogs.

What kind of dogs. Like...Chihuahs or Pitbulls? or Alsatians? or rottweilers or dobermans or what?

No but yeah, I see what you sayin. The Canine Conspiracy. This must be stopped!
 
V
Want to really understand women, read a romance novel.

Okay you've piqued my interest. Random Excerpt I found:
“I mean, okay, a sitcom isn’t exactly film,” she’d said that morning, waving a toothbrush around. “But it’s one step closer, right?”

“Right,” Michael agreed. He was still in bed, watching her bounce around, talking and brushing teeth all at once. He wanted to always remember her like this always—vibrant and happy, her blue eyes shining as she padded around wearing nothing but one of his dress shirts and a pair of footie socks.

“Can you believe it?” she asked him for the thousandth time.

“Yeah,” he said, and leaned back, sprawled across the bed. “I can definitely believe it. You’re awesome.”

She laughed, tossed the toothbrush aside and gleefully pounced on him. “See? This I why I love you, Mikey. I can forgive your sock problem because you’re so wonderful to me.”

“Hey,” he protested, looking at the ridiculous footie socks she was wearing. “I don’t have a sock problem—youdo.”

“No, I have sock standards, which is totally different. And my standard is on your feet, in the laundry, or in a drawer,” she said, as she nuzzled his neck.

“But I don’t even get a fifteen second grace period,” he complained. “Once they hit the floor, the Sock Nazi appears out of nowhere, demanding I put them in the hamper.”

“You’re lucky! I haven’t said anything about boxers yet,” she said, and bit him on the neck.

“What are you doing?” he asked, his hand automatically going to her, stroking her back, her bare leg.

“Leaving a mark so you’ll know how much I’ll miss you when you’re gone.”

The remark made him flinch inwardly. Leah was used to his absence for a week, two weeks tops, but she had no idea that forever was around the corner. That was because Leah really didn’t know much about him at all.

Okay ...that's enough. Revelatory, It's been revelatory.

Yep...That was some good advice. A good rabbit hole to go down. Darkkin!

Another:

"Want to come up?" he asked. She'd left her bags in his apartment, with the understanding that they'd pick them up after dinner and he'd take her to the hotel she'd booked. More than once, when they'd been talking, he'd offered her his bed, saying he'd sleep on the couch, and Rachel had turned him down, politely but firmly.

Without a word, she climbed into the passenger seat, smiling at him, saying, "Yes."

As soon as his front door was shut they started kissing again. Her tongue fluttered against his, and his hands were deep in the softness of her hair, and it was like time unspooled, carrying them right back to when they were teenagers. He pulled her against him, thinking that he'd never get her close enough, that if he could fold her inside of him, like a mother tucking a baby into her coat, he'd do it. He'd keep her warm, he'd keep her safe, he'd keep her with him, always.

Taking her hand, Andy led her to his bedroom, which looked like every room he'd ever lived in — a bed, a dresser, the posters on the wall. She nibbled at his chin, his ear, touching his face with her fingertips, sighing, whispering, "You feel so good." Once, she pushed him back, propped herself onto her elbows, and asked, "How long has it been?"

Andy knew what she was asking, and it wasn't how long it had been since he'd seen her. He thought back to his last romance, if you could even call it that, ten minutes of undignified fumbling in the bathroom of a bar downtown. "It's been a little while," he said. That girl — God, he wasn't even sure what her name was — had scribbled her phone number on his hand in eyeliner, if he remembered right, after neither one of them could find paper or a pen. The next week, when they'd met for drinks, Andy realized that they had absolutely nothing to say to each other and that, when he didn't have four beers inside him, she looked like an eel, with a narrow body and a big, horsey mouth.

Not many of the runners had serious girlfriends. Hookups were more common, a night or a weekend with another athlete who understood the deal, or a woman who'd attach herself to you at a meet, or in a bar. Andy remembered the time he'd spent with a television reporter who'd been covering the Olympic trials in Atlanta. She'd worn a girdle and had gotten annoyed when he'd laughed. "It's a foundation garment," she'd said, her pretty face looking less pretty when she scowled. After they'd finished, he'd been starving, but all she had in the refrigerator of her chrome-and-stainless-steel loft was seltzer and a jar of pickles.

Not Rachel, he realized, now that he had Rachel in his arms again, her lush curves and her soft skin, her beautiful hair, her beautiful scar. That was the problem with the reporter. That was the problem with all of them. None of them were Rachel.

He felt her slip down the bed. She unfastened his pants,"------Snip


Okay That's a lot better. That's by Mrs Weiner btw, Jenifer Weiner. I'm not making this Up !!!

Who Do You Love by Jennifer Weiner. Copyright © 2015 by Jennifer Weiner, Inc. Published by Atria Books, a Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc. on August 11, 2015. ISBN 978145167818
 
I want to point out a few things. If someone made a video like that about women, it would not be tolerated. Some would rage about it and others would be forced to appologize.

And as a man, it's strange to see that so many people are trying to convince us men that masculinity is toxic. It's something negative. It's poison, it's bad for us and everyone else, they say.

We're men, we are born with masculinity. So how can that be wrong. And what are we supposed to do? I don't think people understand how much this affects men in negative ways. People are now trying to train us, like dogs. Change who and what we are. We're now constantly being told that we are wrong and toxic and we must change. I not taking part in that. I'm a normal and decent man, I'm not hurting anyone and I'm not changing. And I'm keeping my masculinity. I was born a man and I was raised to be a man. So I'm sticking with that.

@Forest Cat, I don't think you got the point of the spoof. It was a man making fun of masculine stereotypes that in Australia we would describe as "bogan" or "redneck" - the "I'm such a man" type man that people who aren't like that laugh about (and that a lot of women I know roll their eyes about, from dating experience). Similar spoofing is done by women about certain types of stereotypical women, like the Kardashians.

Here's an example of a woman spoofing both a stereotype of femininity and the show Australian Idol.


It's the same sort of thing and no, I'm not offended by her spoof, I find it funny - I guess I'm about as far from that stereotype as you could get. And I find the spoof that JP did on a stereotype of certain types of guys funny, and Brett - a guy - finds it totally hilarious. (It points at the types of guys that typically bully other people at school and harass women sexually.)

The point of a parody is to invite reflection - to point an exaggerated mirror at society, or aspects of society.

Now you don't have to find it funny just because we do, but it's not an attack on masculinity per se - just on one popular interpretation of it, which men like my husband and JP (who did the spoofing) find as unhelpful as the Barbie doll was for girls. And also, yes, I would class some of those attitudes spoofed as toxic masculinity, and we do, as a society, have to talk about that, because of the social problems being caused by it. Just as we also have to talk about unsavoury things that women do - like was related in the thread by the piano tuner recently.

It bugs me not at all if people want to spoof Barbie or Kardashian stereotypes of women, and it bugs my husband not at all if people want to spoof Ken-doll or Arnie or redneck takes on masculinity. We see it as a valid critique, and we think there are better ways to be.

And I don't personally see you as being like the stereotype that's being spoofed in the clip, so I'm a bit surprised you got offended by it.
 
I like cheese too, @maycontainthunder. :)

So much that we even made up a story about it. :tonguewink:

The Garden Of Edam
Chaource_cheese.jpg

Photo courtesy of Renaud d’Avout d’Auerstaedt, Wikimedia Commons

In the beginning, there was the void. And God said, let there be cheese, and there was cheese. God saw that the cheese was good, and made more cheese. And behold there was Gouda, Wensleydale, Gruyère, Cheddar, Camembert, Mozzarella, Havarti, Parmesan, Feta, those little BabyBel things, and all manner of cheese.

And God created man and woman to eat the cheese, and he created a garden for them to dwell in, and he called it the Garden of Edam.

And God made a Gorgonzola tree in the garden, amidst all the other cheeses. And he said unto the man and the woman, You may eat of all the cheese in the Garden of Edam, but you shall not eat of the Gorgonzola.

But the man had a snake, and it was a naughty snake, and it spake unto him and said, Come on, eat the Gorgonzola already! And the man did, since he always does as his snake bids him. And his breath stank of Gorgonzola, and the woman was displeased.

But not as displeased as God, who came walking into the Garden of Edam for a visit, sniffed the man, and grew wrathful. And God said unto the man, You reek of Gorgonzola! You have done wrong and will be cast out and you can make your own bloody cheese!

And God cast out the man and the woman and destroyed the Garden of Edam with so much heat that it became a giant fondue, which God hauled off to Valhalla, where Thor was very happy about this gift, filled the molten cheese into kegs, and said Skål to all the Viking Warriors. The End.


This is a collaboration from the language and story games we play at our house. Brett and I do ‘alternating sentences’ impromptu storytelling for entertainment, and that’s how this little number came about. Once we have a theme, we quickly tell the story, egging each other on to become more and more outrageous if possible. I thought I’d share this one for a laugh. :smilecat:
 
My reponses to the question insult 'are you a man or a mouse?'

Would be something like this:

You've got eyes haven't you. cant you tell one mammal from the other?

I'm a maaan baby ! *austin powers tone*

hmnnn...yeah.... *proceeds to ignore* turns back

I am clearly a simian of the primate variety.

Who you callin rodent...you (insert expletives of your choice)

I Sure I could think of more....but never...never in million years would I answer an insult with a self depreciation confirmation.....that's just me...you know...

I have had a women insult me before.... so I'm not stranger to this LOL. I just glared....I'm trying think what I said back, but I don't think I was insulting, just a defiant thing. One incident in particular. Much more heated than a mere remark. But as far as macho thing goes. Most men don't think They just react in the moment. I know I do. SO I think alot of these 'macho stereotypes, people complain about, are really ingrained subconscious processes. If you want to try and train men out of these behaviors...all i'm gonna say..is...good luck with that ! :);)

I agree world is full of toxic masculinity. Passive femininity. etc.And these are age old stereotypes. But the ways of the word are like the seasons. You can cry about summer decaying into autumn, you can rejoice about spring blossoming out of winter. But you can't change it. It's just how it is.
 
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Thank you @Callistemon

It is good to look at yourself occasionally and see someone pointing out things you would rather not accept.
I enjoyed the mickey being taken in each of the clips.

I am reminded of the line "tell the truth but tell it slant"
 
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