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Is it okay to brew Kombucha in a plastic jug?

Greatshield17

Claritas Prayer Group#9435

I’m thinking of brewing Kombucha, but the only jug I have is plastic; is it okay to use that or does it have to be glass? I do have a glass bowl, but I want to use it for other things like making yogurt.
 
hade No Idea what Kombucha was had to look it up, I am quite familiar with plastics if you stick with poly propylene or polyethylene you should be OK.
 
Kombucha - that is so good. It was popular in MN, but doesn't so popular in FL.

They have the glass tea bottles they put in the sun to brew, have you seen those?
 
No plastic would not be a good idea as it porus and can trap bacteria both good and bad. Glass jars or containers only. Remember the vessel you use will be amazing for what you want for your kombucha but also an amazing environment for things that could make your sick. Have fun fermenting!

(My mother has been canning and fermenting since I was a kid we actually have a scoby growing in a jar across the room from where I am sitting right now!)

Edit:
This will be the kind of jar you want
This is a good article to help It seems like you could use ceramic and porcelain as well but glass is still the #1 pick.
 
In my work I have had to test various polymers for properties. PE, even HDPE (high density polyethylene) is porous and oxygen permeable. For liquids, polycarbonates are probably the best. Anything flexible probably has trace plasticizers that are extractable by liquids. (the worst of those are phthalates as these have hormonal effects) Best stick with glass for liquids containing organics and has a low pH.
 
No, not at all. I made it for years, it was wonderful! Used lots of organic fruit for a second ferment and that gave it more bubbles and flavor (plus more sugar, never enough sugar).

Don’t use plastic.

I ordered giant glass bottles, like about 3 gal each. I got mine at the time from a glass wholesaler, but they sold them to walmart! Have no idea if they still sell them, they came with a top but you won’t use it making kombucha. I used an old cut up white sheet and a rubber band for the top of mine. The white sheet can be bleached after using and then reused.

Good luck, oh...and they will stink up a room (or house) big time like vinegar - I did get tired of the smell so if you have a room away from others it may be better. Warm air makes them grow too fast so nothing too hot.
 
Go to the local health food store where the hippies get food at, and buy a large gallon-size glass jug of apple juice. Make hard cider out of the apple juice, drink that, and then use the jug.
 
I've been brewing kombucha for almost twenty years. And had a thriving kombucha wholesale business for ten.

Yes plastic is fine. A food grade bucket is probably the best. A lot of people also brew it in sun tea jars with spigots in the bottom. That way they can have a continuous brew.

Most people use plastic. But people who have more money or who actively try to avoid plastics go with glass or ceramics. Please note that it is very heavy and unwieldy.

Best to go with something like this below. You can often get them for free from a grocery store deli dept or from a restaurant just by asking. Some might make you pay a small deposit for it ($2 or so):

iu


If you want to have a continuous brew with a spigot, so you can drink from it as it brews with less mess, it's best to go with a sun tea jar:
iu


The most important thing is that kombucha requires a lot of oxygen, so make sure you don't put a lid on top. Most people rubberband a cloth or some paper towels on top.
 
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Go to the local health food store where the hippies get food at, and buy a large gallon-size glass jug of apple juice. Make hard cider out of the apple juice, drink that, and then use the jug.


This will not work. Kombucha needs a big wide area, like a bucket or crock. If it has a small spigot, it will not have enough oxygen and will grow bad bacteria and mold.
 
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This will not work. Kombucha needs a big wide area, like a bucket or crock. If it has a smal spigot, it will not have enough oxygen and will grow bad bacteria and mold.
Good to know. I'd seen friends growing kombucha and they used a closed bottle--no wonder it looked so weird.
 
In my work I have had to test various polymers for properties. PE, even HDPE (high density polyethylene) is porous and oxygen permeable. For liquids, polycarbonates are probably the best. Anything flexible probably has trace plasticizers that are extractable by liquids. (the worst of those are phthalates as these have hormonal effects) Best stick with glass for liquids containing organics and has a low pH.
thars what I was eluding to stay away from the plasticizers, they tend to migrate out depending on the age of the plastic container
 
Yes, age of plastic is very important.

Agree! With the high alkaline of vinegar I wouldn’t trust plastic especially since your leaving it for days.

We have a problem with plastics in the ocean and in the water - makes no sense to me to use something that can harm you. The 3 gal jars I got were less than $20 ea and you can use them forever, twenty dollars for something you can use till you die well, do the math. I’ll go on the safe side.

@Gerald Wilgus Thank you for the science on how it works, very interesting! I enjoy your post :)
 
I'm starting to get uncomfortable giving opinion on food grade plastics, considering my expertise is industrial painting which is basically applying a plastic film on various substrates. I guess my additional knowledge of micro biology in conflicting me.
 
Vinegar as sold in stores is 5% acetic acid, not alkali (which is a base.)

The science doesn’t support your findings, please state where you got your information that vinegar is not alkaline? Where is your proof?

Your being silly I hope, your making a joke? Certainly you can’t be serious?
 
Vinegar as sold in stores is 5% acetic acid, not alkali (which is a base.)[/Q
THis is a common mistake among people not formally trained in chemistry, organic acids containa hydroxl group which makes them acidic sort of counter to mineral acids.
 
The science doesn’t support your findings, please state where you got your information that vinegar is not alkaline? Where is your proof?

Your being silly I hope, your making a joke? Certainly you can’t be serious?

From Wikipedia on "Vinegar" -- "As the most easily manufactured mild acid, it has historically had a wide variety of industrial and domestic uses, including use as a household cleaner.[1]"

Is Vinegar an Acid or Base? And Does It Matter? (healthline.com)
 
I agree with Gerontius about buying a gallon glass jug of cider and using that jug. If you don't want to ferment the cider, you can either drink it or boil it down to make apply syrup which is a nice departure from maple syrup. It's not as sweet and has a tang to it.

I used to make kombucha but stopped. I don't think it's good for a person's teeth. Not only the residual sugar, but also with a pH of 2.5-3.5 it's acidic.
 
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