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Featured What was ASD2 called before the DSM-V

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by PastelPetals, Jun 23, 2020.

  1. PastelPetals

    PastelPetals Active Member

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    I understand 1 was aspergers (I think) and 3 was classic but was was 2? Did they just make that up for DSM-V
     
  2. menander

    menander Well-Known Member

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    I know older people who were given the label of schizophrenia, borderline, bipolar, etc. :-(
     
  3. PastelPetals

    PastelPetals Active Member

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    Oh that's really unfortunate. I am glad more people are getting correct diagnosis. While I know the people diagnosed with those things today can get treatment depending on how old those people where those could have just all been synonyms for "bad person" and that is really unfortunate for people with those disorders as well.
     
  4. Matthias

    Matthias Well-Known Member

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    ASD2 and ASD3 were both called autistic disorder in the DSM-IV. They never had separate labels. The DSM-5 merged 5 diagnoses (autistic disorder, Asperger's, Rett's, CDD, and PDD-NOS) into one spectrum with 3 levels of severity to indicate level of impairment. Before 1980, autism was called childhood schizophrenia. Some with milder ASD2 might not have met the criteria at the time.
     
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  5. PastelPetals

    PastelPetals Active Member

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    Wow that is a lot of switching around labels...no wonder so many people (I guess me in this case me) get confused.
     
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  6. SteveNomad

    SteveNomad Well-Known Member

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    ...I was DX'd paranoid schizophrenic in 1980 or so:cry:. That led to me being put away and stuffed full of drugs:disappointed:. It ruined my life:tired::tearsofjoy:.
     
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  7. Matthias

    Matthias Well-Known Member

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    Much of psychiatry and the mental health field is pure evil. Prisons aren't even allowed to drug inmates against their will even if they're murders awaiting execution so you had less rights than a criminal. I bet you probably didn't even get a trial to defend yourself or a lawyer to represent your interests. A couple decades earlier they would have given you a lobotomy. Even CBT (the only treatment I know that's been proven helpful) is often presented in a patronizing way by arrogant psychologists who love looking down and talking to their patients in a condescending way. I benefited greatly by using CBT on my own in my own way but could have overcame my problems much sooner if it wasn't for a really bad experience with CBT that made me never want to try it again.
     
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  8. Ezra

    Ezra Relax, it's just chaos.

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    Paraphrased:

    1 = mild - some support might be needed (can take care of self but might need assistance in certain areas)
    2 = moderate - support needed (can take care of self to a degree but also needs assistance)
    3 = severe - substantial support needed (can not take care of self, is totally dependent on assistance)

    Originally only severe classic autism as defined by Leo Kanner was recognized. Later on Hans Asperger defined a much milder form of autism.
    Somewhere in that process it was realized there were those who were in between Kanner's severe and Asperger's mild autism.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2020
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  9. Sarah S

    Sarah S Well-Known Member

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    Actually

    Level 1 autism
    People with level 1 autism have noticeable issues with communication skills and socializing with others. They can usually have a conversation, but it might be difficult to maintain a back-and-forth banter.

    Others at this level might find it hard to reach out and make new friends. According to the DSM-5, people who receive a diagnosis of level 1 autism require support.

    Symptoms
    • decreased interest in social interactions or activities
    • difficulty initiating social interactions, such as talking to a person
    • ability to engage with a person but may struggle to maintain a give-and-take of a typical conversation
    • obvious signs of communication difficulty
    • trouble adapting to changes in routine or behavior
    • difficulty planning and organizing
    Outlook
    People with level 1 autism often maintain a high quality of life with little support. This support usually comes in the form of behavioral therapy or other types of therapy. Both of these approaches can help improve social and communication skills. Behavioral therapy can also help develop positive behaviors that might not come naturally.


    Level 2 autism
    The DSM-5 notes those with level 2 autism require substantial support. The symptoms associated with this level include a more severe lack of both verbal and nonverbal communication skills. This often makes daily activities difficult.

    Symptoms
    • difficulty coping with change to routine or surroundings
    • significant lack of verbal and nonverbal communication skills
    • behavior issues severe enough to be obvious to the casual observer
    • unusual or reduced response to social cues, communication, or interactions
    • trouble adapting to change
    • communication using overly simple sentences
    • narrow, specific interests
    Outlook
    People with level 2 autism generally need more support than those with level 1 autism. Even with support, they may have a hard time adjusting to changes in their environment.

    A variety of therapies can help. For example, sensory integration therapy may be used at this level. It helps people learn how to deal with sensory input, such as:

    • off-putting smells
    • loud or annoying sounds
    • distracting visual changes
    • flashing lights
    Those with level 2 autism tend to also benefit from occupational therapy. This type of therapy helps people develop the skills they need to complete daily tasks, such as decision-making or job-related skills.

    Level 3 autism
    This is the most severe level of autism. According to the DSM-5, those at this level require very substantial support. In addition to a more severe lack of communication skills, people with level 3 autism also display repetitive or restrictive behaviors.

    Repetitive behaviors refer to doing the same thing over and over, whether it’s a physical action or speaking the same phrase. Restrictive behaviors are those that tend to distance someone from the world around them. This might involve an inability to adapt to change or narrow interests in very specific topics.

    Symptoms
    • highly visible lack of verbal and nonverbal communication skills
    • very limited desire to engage socially or participate in social interactions
    • trouble changing behaviors
    • extreme difficulty coping with unexpected change to routine or environment
    • great distress or difficulty changing focus or attention
    Outlook
    People with level 3 autism often need frequent, intensive therapy that focuses on a variety of issues, including communication and behavior.

    They may also benefit from medication. While there’s no medication that treats autism specifically, certain drugs can help manage specific symptoms or co-occurring disorders, such as depression or trouble focusing.

    Someone with this level of autism may also need a caregiver who helps them learn basic skills that will allow them to be successful in school, at home, or at work.

    Btw im ASD 3 and i do live alone BUT i have and had support all my life from among others my VERY dear friend who has takend over my moms role as she sadly has Alziemers :(
     
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  10. Ezra

    Ezra Relax, it's just chaos.

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    Most level 3s I know of require a care home and need to be looked after.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2020
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  11. Sarah S

    Sarah S Well-Known Member

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    As long as we both can agree that NOT ALL needs to be in care homes and can live at home often WITH added support from the outside. Im okey with it my friend (i know utliest one member in here that is same as me that is also able to both have a husband and live alone without a care home)

    I should also add that there is a debate on how the levels are to be described and how to difrence them all propley as they do have obvius flaws. As we can all agree on im shore based on our different opinions in this matter
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2020
  12. Adora

    Adora Well-Known Member

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    Before I discovered that I was on the spectrum I was misdiagnosed Schizoaffective but I now know that these type of misdiagnosis are pretty common with those on
    the spectrum and makes you think how many are out there who
    are really on the spectrum but are still stuck with these misdiagnoses.
     
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  13. Progster

    Progster Gone sideways to the sun V.I.P Member

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    At the time of the DSM IV it used to be that if a person had autistic traits that limited their ability to cope, and also a significant speeech delay (didn't start speaking until after about 4 years old, if at all, then they would be diagnosed with autism, 'high functioning' for those who were more independent and needed less support.

    If you had no speech delay, then, like me, you received a diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome, and this was regardless of your functioning ability or support needed. So you could get people with a lot of diffiulties, with comorbid conditions perhaps, needing a lot of support, but because they had no speech delay their diagnosis would still be Asperger's. Those same people under the DSM 5 might get a diagnosis of ASD level 2. There have been one or two people on this forum with a diagnosis of Asperger's, who have needed carers or have not been able to live independently, but also others who initially had a speech delay and received a diagnosis of autism, but then become more independent and now need less support - these people would probably be classed as ASD level 1 in the DSM5.

    Of course, as has been pointed out, many people were misdiagnosed, or their autism wasn't picked up on because it was overshadowed by other learning or executive functioning difficulties, such as my brother, who has autistic traits and is probably on the spectrum but was only diagnosed with Tourettes. He needs a lot of support, and would probably be level 2 if diagnosed today. Before the DSM IV, autism was considered a rare and severe condition, and much fewer people were diagnosed with it than are today, and if you didn't have a speech delay it was unlikely that you would be diagnosed with it.
     
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  14. Ezra

    Ezra Relax, it's just chaos.

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    Definitely not all. Autism' has too many variables for "one size fits all". I also know a level 3 who is like you and the other you speak of (which might be the same person). In the case of the one I know, her situation is somewhat complected. It's like I understood the explaination, but it was still kinda hard for me to follow. I'm more "textbook" but still ping pong between 2 and 3 depending on the circumstances.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2020
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  15. Sarah S

    Sarah S Well-Known Member

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    I dident leave the hospital until i was 3 (from birth due to my also Lipp and pallet cleft so as far back as i can rember as a child 3+ i also had to go to speech doctors to learn how to speek pretty much thru out elemtary school if i remember correctly.And this was not only due to the Lip and palett cleft it was also i was late on EVERYTHING and my dear mom and then later my step dad had there hands full trying to teach me bacilky everything that i need later in life (incl how to tye my shoes ,tell the time , geting dressed etc.......... :rolleyes:

    Ps reel dad left when i was still in the hospital as mom said you cant accept or cope were done . NOT his fault and we do love eatchoder and found our self together as daughter and father later in life and he have been in the backround ALL my life without me knowing he was on the rekommendations from the docs aparantly :rolleyes:
     
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  16. PastelPetals

    PastelPetals Active Member

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    Thank you for the information! I made this thread as I have been confused since I have level 2 and I never got a good answer for what that meant. I know people with 1 and I know people with 3 not many with 2 though so I did not fully know. The level system seems a little flawed though as some days I "seem more level 3" other days "more level 1" maybe that's why I am 2 in the end. Thank you again for the information!
     
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  17. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I was diagnosed with clinical depression, social anxiety and OCD. All at a time when the APA was just beginning to process and accept Dr. Asperger's research. The subject of autism just never came up. Though I suspect if I ever sought a formal diagnosis presently, that I would firmly be within the realm of level one ASD.

    And of course, it didn't some 20+ years earlier when I was examined by doctors on the request of my parents.

    What did medical professionals call me so many years before the DSM-5? - "Just fine". :rolleyes:
     
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  18. Sarah S

    Sarah S Well-Known Member

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    actually what i says is

    E. These disturbances are not better explained by intellectual disability (intellectual developmental disorder) or global developmental delay.

    Intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder frequently co-occur; to make comorbid diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, social communication should be below that expected for general developmental level.

    Note: Individuals with a well-established DSM-IV diagnosis of autistic disorder, Asperger’s disorder, or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified should be given the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. Individuals who have marked deficits in social communication, but whose symptoms do not otherwise meet criteria for autism spectrum disorder, should be evaluated for social (pragmatic) communication disorder.

    Specify if:
    • With or without accompanying intellectual impairment
    • With or without accompanying language impairment
      • (Coding note: Use additional code to identify the associated medical or genetic condition.)
    • Associated with another neurodevelopmental, mental, or behavioral disorder
      • (Coding note: Use additional code to identify the associated neurodevelopmental, mental, or behavioral disorder.)

      [*]With catatonia
      [*]Associated with a known medical or genetic condition or environmental factor
     
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  19. Matthias

    Matthias Well-Known Member

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    That's correct but I think many people who consider themselves ASD1 don't require any support.
     
  20. Matthias

    Matthias Well-Known Member

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    If autism couldn't be caused solely by low intelligence (meaning low IQ causes all of the social impairments and repetitive behavior required for a diagnosis), there would be no reason for that exclusion.

    The existence of that exclusion shows low IQ causes autism but they just don't want those people diagnosed with autism unless their symptoms are worse than other people with the same IQ.


    Around one-third of people with ASD have ID (IQ < 70). They only want people whose social impairments are lower than other people with the same IQ to be diagnosed with autism. That's important for research purposes because there is no point in studying what causes autism in those people when it's already known their ID caused them to be autistic. It's also important when studying treatments to tell when someone has recovered from autism. People with ASD3 who improve to the point where their social impairments are the same as other people with the same IQ are considered to have recovered from autism and qualify to have their autism diagnosis removed.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2020