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Greatshield17

An Appeal to Heaven!
V.I.P Member
Hi, I'm still really busy with my novel, but I need some advice here; as most of you know, I plan on moving to my extended family's farm down in Chile. (In fact, I'm hoping to do it this autumn, after they bring in the countries new constitution) Of course different countries have different power outlets so I've been planning on purchasing power plug adapters for the devices I plan on taking with me; but just recently, I purchased a food grinder (as I plan on growing wheat this season and making bread) and I accidentally ended-up buying a foreign one with a type-c power plug. (Coincidentally, one of the two types of power plugs used in Chile.)

I found this video below on foreign power outlets and plugs, and found that, not only do different countries volts and Hrz, but also that some appliances like mixers, aren't save to use even if you use a power converter. Do you think my food grinder would be safe to use here with a power converter? (It is quite small) And what other advice and experience do you have on foreign power outlets and adapters?:
 

Tom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
The issue with mixers, microwaves, etc, is much higher wattage needed. Most of the 'travel' power converters you see are for small appliances/equipment that travelers typically have in their suitcase. You could run a mixer if the power converter is rated high enough. I don't know what true heavy duty converters are like today, but back in the day they were the size of a toaster and weighed a ton.

But there are multiple considerations. Some equipment comes able to handle 220VAC/50HZ or 110VAC/60HZ. You just have to adjust a switch.

The easiest thing for me is if you could just take a pic of your machine data label wiith the Voltage, Amperage Ratings, etc. Then I could tell what is required, if anything.
 

Forest Cat

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
If it was me, I would buy food grinders and the things you need in Chile. Then you don't have to worry about adapters and such.
 

VictorR

Random Member
V.I.P Member
If it was me, I would buy food grinders and the things you need in Chile. Then you don't have to worry about adapters and such.

I concur. The cost and hassle of finding and buying appropriate adapters / converters and then bringing everything with you in extra luggage or shipping them (neither of which may come cheap) may turn out to cost more than simply buying the devices you need once you arrive in your new home.
 

Greatshield17

An Appeal to Heaven!
V.I.P Member
The issue with mixers, microwaves, etc, is much higher wattage needed. Most of the 'travel' power converters you see are for small appliances/equipment that travelers typically have in their suitcase. You could run a mixer if the power converter is rated high enough. I don't know what true heavy duty converters are like today, but back in the day they were the size of a toaster and weighed a ton.

But there are multiple considerations. Some equipment comes able to handle 220VAC/50HZ or 110VAC/60HZ. You just have to adjust a switch.

The easiest thing for me is if you could just take a pic of your machine data label wiith the Voltage, Amperage Ratings, etc. Then I could tell what is required, if anything.
Sorry it took me so long to reply, here's a photo of the instructions which includes info about the wattage and the like:
IMG_1872.JPG
 

Tom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Sorry it took me so long to reply, here's a photo of the instructions which includes info about the wattage and the like:
View attachment 78720

It will run fine in Chile. It doesn't need a power converter. You may need a type C to L adapter (two to three prong). I don't know what type power sockets you will run into there so best be prepared for both.
 

Greatshield17

An Appeal to Heaven!
V.I.P Member
It will run fine in Chile. It doesn't need a power converter. You may need a type C to L adapter (two to three prong). I don't know what type power sockets you will run into there so best be prepared for both.
I'm talking about it working here!
but just recently, I purchased a food grinder (as I plan on growing wheat this season and making bread) and I accidentally ended-up buying a foreign one with a type-c power plug. (Coincidentally, one of the two types of power plugs used in Chile.)
 

Tom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I'm talking about it working here!

That wasn't very clear. To run it here you will need a step up 110v to 220v power converter rated to at least 200w. You'll have to do the shopping. It may cost more then your mixer.
 

Gerontius

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
The one I'd have gone with would be something like a flywheel-powered grain grinder, running on a V-belt. This can be run on any sort of washing-machine motor or something like that, or an old petrol engine, or anything else with a pulley. You could even turn it by hand if you cannot find a motor.

Keep an eye on the Lehman's non-electric catalog. I'm not sure whether you have looked there yet or not but I would recommend there. Prices can seem quite high but a lot of good tools are expensive. Try to buy used machines & tools too if you can, and learn to repair or make your own.
 

paloftoon

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Sounds worthwhile to invest in a universal adapter or a few. In the US, it seems at Walmart anyway, they don't specify regions or specific countries so much now. They just sell the universal ones only.
 

Greatshield17

An Appeal to Heaven!
V.I.P Member
That wasn't very clear. To run it here you will need a step up 110v to 220v power converter rated to at least 200w. You'll have to do the shopping. It may cost more then your mixer.
Okay, I have one now and was able to try-out my grain grinder thanks.
 

Greatshield17

An Appeal to Heaven!
V.I.P Member
The one I'd have gone with would be something like a flywheel-powered grain grinder, running on a V-belt. This can be run on any sort of washing-machine motor or something like that, or an old petrol engine, or anything else with a pulley. You could even turn it by hand if you cannot find a motor.

Keep an eye on the Lehman's non-electric catalog. I'm not sure whether you have looked there yet or not but I would recommend there. Prices can seem quite high but a lot of good tools are expensive. Try to buy used machines & tools too if you can, and learn to repair or make your own.
Thanks, I'll certainly checkout Lehman's catalog sometime in the future.

Out of curiosity, awhile ago I was thinking of looking into getting a typewriter, I probably won't for awhile because I want to save-up money for moving, publishing my book and other things; but what kind of typewriter would you recommend?
 

Gerontius

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Out of curiosity, awhile ago I was thinking of looking into getting a typewriter, I probably won't for awhile because I want to save-up money for moving, publishing my book and other things; but what kind of typewriter would you recommend?

I would not recommend a typewriter; haven't got any current experience with the models in production now. Always favored certain brands but what I loved & worked with, other people hated, and vice versa. Wouldn't give you fifty cents for an Olivetti Valentine, but that's a sought-after machine in the trade. But the first draft of my first book was punched together on a battleship gray Royal standard held together by shoelaces and hope, with a bicycle tire for the platen roller--it leaked oil, smelled of mouse, and had cancerous patches of rust and corrosion growing through the paint, and I wouldn't rightly recommend that to anyone either, but it was the best typewriter I owned then because it was the only typewriter that I had or could find.

For you, after reading your work in that one thread, I recommend you listen to @Darkkin & prioritize the craft instead of fetishizing the tools of the trade. By the time you are passing decent as a writer you'll know how fast you write, how long you like to spend at it, all that, and--then you will be able to decide what works best for you.
 

RotanotNino

Active Member
Chile sounds like an interesting country. Are you immediately eligible for citizenship there? With the Mercosur agreements in place traveling throughout South America is pretty easy for citizens of the signatories assuming money is not an obstacle.
 

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