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Featured Doctors Ignoring Women's Problems.

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by AngelaS267, May 11, 2020.

  1. Albert Wallner

    Albert Wallner New Member

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    I think that is literally the case. ASD is a very rare condition which is very hard to identify so most psychiatrists / psychotherapists aren't trained or educated in it. That's what my psychotherapist said at least. My psychiatrist had also never heard of asperger's syndrom when I went to see her.
    Depression and anxiety is just way more common than ASD and people with ASD usually also suffer from that (me included) which is why it makes sense for them to focus on that. But it really sucks that doctors don't really know much about it just because it's so rare. I actually have a biological disease as well where the same thing applies. :coldsweat:
    There actually is a psychological explanation for that. According to the big 5 personality trait model,women tend to be more agreeable than men. That means that women are more likely to really care about the problems of other people.
    That's really good,you got him with that one! :tearsofjoy:
    I would definitely disagree with that. Seeing a therapist who specializes in CBT and who knows about ASD can really help someone to deal with ASD. That was the case with me anyway. My therapist has helped me out so much with my ASD it's incredible! I'm literally only here right now because of her.:relieved:
    Getting a proper diagnosis can actually give you a lot of benefits that you were entitled to your entire life but just didn't know about. That was the case for me as well. Now that I know that I have ASD I can get some pretty cool and helpful benefits in college. Here is a link to all the benefits that you can get in the UK in case anybody is interested: Benefits - National Autistic Society :smile:
     
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  2. Tom

    Tom Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I remember reading a study several years ago where they found the average time a doctor let the patient explain their problem before interjecting/diagnosising was something like 18 seconds. Now this was for general practice medical conditions not mental health, but I would guess some sort of the same thing also occurs in mental health. You do have to be your own advocate to help insure quality/accurate care. Bringing somone else with you (ie. spouse, partner, family member) if feasible, can also be helpful, to remind you of things and as another pair of eyes so-to-speak.
     
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  3. Aspychata

    Aspychata Serenity waves, beachy vibes

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    The autism center may have excellent medical referrals for you. I would check in with that center.

    The other interesting thing about us is our lagging ability to communicate our thoughts which gives the medical peeps problems trying to diagnose us. We can get so wrapped in our thought process then really do a horrible job trying to get someone else to diagnosed us. Its like we are talking in a foreign language. A therapist l went to, knew nothing about autism yet a huge number of us end up in counseling trying to make sense of our brain splat of inner turmoil.
     
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  4. menander

    menander Active Member

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    That is peculiar. I wonder why it's in there. I was told it's not mental illness.
     
  5. BrokenBoy

    BrokenBoy 戯言使い(Nonsense User)

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    It doesn't seem that those categories are mututally exclusive:
    kok.PNG
     
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  6. BrokenBoy

    BrokenBoy 戯言使い(Nonsense User)

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    I also found this quote from an article that's really interesting:

    The motivation behind the push to label autism as something other than a psychiatric disorder, in my view, comes much more from fears of stigma than any scientific principle. Unfortunately, however, one unintended consequence of the push to move certain conditions out of the mental illness category is increased stigmatization for those that remain there. “We are not you,” is the not so subtle message being sent.

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/blog/abcs-child-psychiatry/201510/is-autism-mental-illness

    I find the "message" this guy mentions to be quite problematic.
     
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  7. Mia

    Mia Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    There is a difference though:

    'Neurological disorders like Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease can be clustered together because they all involve malfunction of or damage to the nervous system — the brain, spinal cord, and nerves. Nervous system infections are also treated by neurologists. The hallmarks of psychiatric disorders, on the other hand, are disturbed behavior and emotional state'.

    At times damage from these illnesses can require psychiatric help. But both of these fields are exclusive yet depend on one another for the exchange of information.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2020
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  8. Mia

    Mia Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I don't find his ideas to be accurate, it's not about a separation from others with recognizable metal illnesses. Mental health difficulties becomes a mental illness when ongoing signs and symptoms cause frequent stress and affect your ability to function on a regular basis for quite extended periods of time. And perhaps for some with autism, some co-morbid disorders affect daily living and functioning. But, it's the co-morbids that are treated not autism.

    Keep in mind from the same article: "only medications with FDA approval in autism are psychiatric medications, although these are used to address irritability and aggression and not the core autistic features".

    In other words the meds are used to treat co-morbid disorders that sometimes go hand in hand with autism. Like depression, anxiety, adhd, and others that people find it difficult to function with. Much like people who may be treated for long-studied mental illness such as schizophrenia.
     
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  9. BrokenBoy

    BrokenBoy 戯言使い(Nonsense User)

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    I disagree with this, while I have comorbid conditions, ASD is arguably my most debilitating condition.

    Because of ASD I struggle to have meaningful connections with people with leads to isolation and feelings of loneliness and I can barely handle even being touched by others most of the time. I also experience sensory issues often leading up to panic attacks and a lot of people with ASD including myself are unemployed.
     
  10. Mia

    Mia Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    For you that may be correct. But for many individuals with ASD, who have jobs and function adequately in the world it's not. It does depend on the severity of your ASD, as it is a spectrum.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2020
  11. AngelaS267

    AngelaS267 Active Member

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    Not connecting with people still wouldn't necessarily classify autism as a mental illness though, because your describing a result of our neurological differences combatting with social constructs and not necessarily the fact that your communication is "wrong." If you lived in a country that praised people for being quiet and having poise, then nobody would think twice about the fact that you don't talk a lot as an autistic person. Also, shy people who aren't autistic have a hard time creating meaningful connections with people, but that wouldn't make shyness a mental illness. The same goes for being introverted or awkward. Your anxiety stems from a difference in communication style which unfortunately impacts our lives, but that doesn't make our autism disordered per say.
     
  12. Nervous Rex

    Nervous Rex High-functioning autistic V.I.P Member

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    Just thought of an alternative reply: "No, Are you sure you're not thinking of Down's Syndrome? That's the one that you can tell just by looking." (Hope this isn't considered derogatory to those with Down's Syndrome - if it is, I wouldn't say it).
     
  13. FormerlyAutistic

    FormerlyAutistic Well-Known Member

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    The reason they don't want to talk to you about autism is probably because they don't understand it. Doctors say things like "you don't look autistic" because they don't want to admit they can't help you with it.

    Given that so few doctors understand autism, I think it's better for most autistic people to rely on self-help books for therapy. Studies have shown that traditional talk therapy isn't effective (they compared it to a placebo, talking to a friend for the same amount of time, and found no difference). The most effective therapy for depression, anxiety, and many other problems is CBT. Fortunately, CBT can be done easily and work just as well using self-help books, eliminating the need for a therapist.

    I found the following CBT videos to be very helpful because they were created specifically to help autistic people with thinking patterns more common in autism:



    They're targeted toward children so some stuff won't be relevant but they helped me greatly and I haven't found anything better. For depression, the book "feeling good" by Dr. Burns is the #1 recommended book by therapists for depression. A study found 70% of those who read it in 4 weeks were no longer depressed after 4 weeks and remained free of depression 3 years later without any need for additional therapy or drugs. CBT, from the videos and self-help book, cured me of life-long depression in less than 4 weeks and I'm still free of depression and anxiety 1 year later. It also helped me correct misunderstandings I had which makes it much easier to understand people to the point where I don't consider myself autistic anymore.
     
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