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Featured Your definition of NT

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by OkRad, Oct 10, 2017.

  1. OkRad

    OkRad Well-Known Member

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    Please define NT, how you see it.

    The more I think about it, the more I am confused by the term. There are so many people i know who are NOT NT that I am beginning to wonder if NT is just the Unicorn.

    I know "NT" means more than "normal." It is neuro functions....however, it seems only a few people are only in that phase and only for a little while and then pass out of it.

    I am thinking first of all those who are NOT NT-(other than Spectrum People)

    1. All patients with dementia, Alzheimers, and later life neurological illness. Since this will represent a huge number of all people (unless there is a cure), then most people will end as non NT.s
    2. All those who minds are obscured with medications. Opioid epidemics, SSRIs , cancer meds, ADHD meds, alcohol, etc.....
    3. Those with head injuries
    4. Those with other brain diseases

    These represent a huge number of people. So is NT just a phase? Is it like a transient state?

    What makes one an NT?

    1. Working does not make one an NT. Lots of non-NTs work.
    2. Having correct perceptions? What does that even mean? I would say most members of congress are more obscured in their thinking than any non-NT I know (and that would include my uncle who had dementia and was very astute but had trouble getting out words).
    3. Having a good social network? Studies now show that a huge percentage of people (NT and nonNT) feel lonely and disconnected.
    4. Having a spouse? I know lots of NT and non NT with spouses and without and all at various and similar levels of happiness and unhappiness....
    5. Solving your own problems? NonNTs are very good at this if the Unicorns would leave them alone.

    What makes an NonNT?
    1. Stims? People with Parkinsons and other illnesses have movements
    2. Sensory issues? Those with metal toxicity and other illness can have very severe sensory issues.
    3. Not looking someone in the eye? Trauma survivors may not make eye contact and may not talk as well.
    4. Deep thoughts and special interests? Unfathomable amounts of people over the years had these issues......one could argue Athens had more people with these traits than not. Same with the explosions of science 1600-1700s and art, music, etc..... In which case, NonNts have severely outweighed NTs throughout history.

    So I am really confused. Yes, I know autism presents in a certain way, early, and all, but there are other illnesses that can look just like it and cause one to be NonNT.

    To me, NT seems to be the temporary and transient ability of a very small group of certain people to reach a carefully constructed (and often impractical and outdated) idea of "normal/typical," which was fabricated by a tiny, elite group of privileged power-people, based on their own behaviours (which was facilitated by their power) in order to secure their own preeminence.

    Other than that, it just makes no sense. The more you know people, the NTs are only there for a while, they are the minority (in which case they are not "typical" and need a new name) and then they become nonNTs too.

    Oh, then they come to us for advise. How do you cope? What should I do? HA bloody HA.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2017
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  2. dragoncat16

    dragoncat16 Active Member

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    NTs are only NTs because they are the majority. Brain injuries and illnesses aside, the aspie brain could very well be considered the norm, if most people were aspie. Then what we call NTs would be considered the odd ones and aspies would be called "neurotypical".
     
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  3. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    My mother had dementia before she passed. At times it made life difficult for me as her caregiver.

    Though I can't say that her dementia traits made her any less Neurotypical and more autistic in the process. I suppose in the strictest terms it depends on what "atypical" traits and behaviors might arise as a result of dementia.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2017
  4. The Midge

    The Midge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    NTs are a mystery.

    An answer in four words. :D. I bet many NTs don't really understand themselves. An unexamined life in most cases.
     
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  5. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    Existing in a vast social and political majority, most have no perspective of neurodiversity because from their point of view there's simply no need to do so.

    Unless of course their lives are somehow "touched" by autistic people who may be a in their family, a friend or in their social orbit in some capacity. Otherwise simply "being" Neurotypical just isn't an issue for them.
     
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  6. OkRad

    OkRad Well-Known Member

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    I think I was too prolix. My main point is they don't exist. Unicorns. They THINK they are "NT" but there is no such thing as NT. I don't know any.
     
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  7. Fridgemagnetman

    Fridgemagnetman I only have one V.I.P Member

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    I depends on the subject of discussion.

    If the discussion is a general one, about neuro diversity, NTs as a group are a useful 'grouping' to which the discussion of neuro diversity can be measured against.

    A necesary general assumption within language to enable broader definition within certain terms.

    Something like that.

    If I'm an alien viewing wikipedia statistics about life on the planet.

    The only definition I may consider is human or sentient.

    Please imagine vogon hitchhikers joke here.
     
  8. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    Well, some people insist that "silent majorities" don't exist. Even when they do. No matter what they may or may not call themselves. When a huge majority functions in an alike manner, it's a difficult concept to ignore if you socially and politically constitute a minority.
     
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  9. Mary Terry

    Mary Terry Active Member

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    The world is primarily populated by NTs. Some NTs have dementia or other brain function issues like Parkinson Disease, in which case they are NTS with dementia or NTs with Parkinson Disease, etc.

    It is interesting to think that if the world were primarily populated by those on the spectrum, then autistics would be considered the neuro-typicals.
     
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  10. OkRad

    OkRad Well-Known Member

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    Curious. How would a pt with Parkisons be considered NT?
     
  11. Hazel87

    Hazel87 Active Member

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    This is a really good question. I do think that there are a lot more neuro-atypical people out there than we even know, but a.) a lot of people live in shame about it and do everything they can to hide it, such as my life before now. b.) we live in a society that doesn't make space for those kinds of brains, and even tries to make us invisible. c.) I suspect a lot of people who are being diagnosed with mental health conditions, in psych wards, on the streets homeless, addicted, etc are not neurotypical but don't even realize it, and don't know how to cope or when they do realize it, they still don't fit into any of the boxes we've created for neurodiversity. I know a lot of people who probably wouldn't be diagnosed as being on the spectrum but closely share a lot of common indicators, or are definitely not neurotypical in other ways.

    As for a definition, that's a complicated question. I think that you're right, like what IS "neurotypical" really when you start to recognize the various ways and states that brains can function and process things, and that studies show there are lots of different types of brains (even if society would rather not recognize that). In my experience I personally loosely define neurotypicals as people who are able to function and process the way that is considered the "norm" by society, the people that this society and culture is made for and therefore they function and succeed a lot easier than those of us who are not neurotypical. They're the people whose brain function and processes don't cause them to permanently struggle with everyday life in this society. Class rooms, school systems, jobs, etc etc are all structured around what suits them and works for them because they are considered the dominant "norm". If that makes sense. They're all the people that I've looked at my whole life and thought to myself "there is no way my brain functions like there's does, everything that comes so natural and easy to them is so hard for me".

    I wouldn't necessarily look at someone who is struggling with a depression or some anxiety as neuro-atypical. Usually, those people are neurotypical but most people will experience some depression and anxiety in their lives, or its due to a bad situation in their lives or maybe trauma. Personally, I consider people who are born with, or through brain damage/chronic mental health conditions etc, brains that don't operate at the level or in ways that is expected by society and that causes them to struggle in various ways and to varying degrees in life. I would say however, that sometimes trauma can cause brain "damage" in that it can alter the processes in your brain for life. So, it's tricky for sure.
     
  12. Keigan

    Keigan Restless Mind V.I.P Member

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    A person without a neurological condition. Which leaves all other possibilities open.
     
  13. Suzanne

    Suzanne Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I find, because I am surrounded by them, that they can be illogical and they have the amazing ability to just get on with life. They never question on how to talk to some one; they just talk. They never wonder if they are over talking. It is just that they know social cues.

    But to be fair, that is not ALL NT's and it also comes down to how one was raised and cultural too; whereas it seems that it doesn't matter where aspies come from and what type of background we have, we still managed very well to be on the same page.

    I am tired and probably should have answered when not so tired, but intriqued by your question and so, made a shoddy job of trying to explain.
     
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  14. Butterfly88

    Butterfly88 Atypical V.I.P Member

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    In addition to what was said, I feel like people with mental illnesses are not neurotypical.
     
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  15. The Midge

    The Midge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    If I were asked to explain what it is like being on the spectrum I would have answer "Sure, but first you would have to explain to me what being neurotypical is like."
     
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  16. The Midge

    The Midge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I'm not sure about this. Being depressed is a natural reaction to life throwing a lot of s--t at you. Anxiety is as a result of not being able to cope with stresses. There is a chemical imbalance in the brain that can be affected by drugs. It is not the at the brain is wired.

    CBT is an attempt at changing thinking patterns. It tries to reprogram the mind. I'm not convinced that it works so well on an autistic mind. (Hey, people really do think you a weird and avoid you, it is not just your imagination).
     
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  17. Mary Terry

    Mary Terry Active Member

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    According to Wikipedia, the term "neurotypical" was invented by autistic people to differentiate others from themselves. It is recently invented terminology, subject to change and refinement in the autistic community.
     
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  18. onlything

    onlything Gathering pieces V.I.P Member

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    It's an interesting philosophical question. Unfortunately, not more than that.

    If NTs didn't exist, then there would be no need for the term.
     
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  19. Mary Terry

    Mary Terry Active Member

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    It depends on how you define neurotypical. Is one's status as NT or ND determined at birth? Or do you measure what you consider characteristics of an NT mind vs. a ND mind at a later point in life? "NT" is a made up anecdotal name for other people judged as different from people on the ASD spectrum so I suppose a person's status as NT or ND can shift with the prevailing winds - or medical diagnoses.

    IMHO, what autistic people call "NT" is just another spectrum/continuum/scale like ASD and should be respected as such.
     
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  20. Nitro

    Nitro Immoral Turpitude Staff Member Admin V.I.P Member

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    Very well then,but your homework for tonite will be to research who came up with the term.
     
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