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What video game are you currently playing?

Slime_Punk

 Please erase
V.I.P Member
I kinda keep trying to start new games, hoping I'll find the perfect game to reignite that ol' passion.
I'm tempted to buy Baldur's Gate 3 because that's exactly the type of game I'd've loved in the past. But I'd hate to waste that much on a game I don't end up playing.

Same here. I think it's more (for me) that other passions have overthrown games. I still enjoy gaming with others for the social aspect, but when I'm alone there are a thousand other things I'd rather be doing. I would say they don't make games engaging anymore, but really I think it's just that I'm not pulled in by them like I used to be. Age probably plays a bit of a factor in that, too.
 

Boogs

Be yourself; everyone else is already taken -Wilde
V.I.P Member
Same here. I think it's more (for me) that other passions have overthrown games. I still enjoy gaming with others for the social aspect, but when I'm alone there are a thousand other things I'd rather be doing. I would say they don't make games engaging anymore, but really I think it's just that I'm not pulled in by them like I used to be. Age probably plays a bit of a factor in that, too.

I can go with that I think. I started off obsessed with the ruddy things, back when they first started, I even remember the first coin-op pong games followed by the simple breakout variants, and followed the progress through the arcade games, into the home computer games, though I ended up sticking with PC rather than consoles (always preferred mouse control in FP shoot-ups, much better in feel and control being analogue). Things like the first Elite, and Doom, XCOM games, Deus-Ex, etc etc. Nowadays I can rarely be bothered, and like your good self prefer other pastimes like reading much more.

It seems like the nearer they get to realistic, the less they appeal, and the less clever they are. When they had to treat the hardware like a precious resource, not to make more realistic as seems the case these days, but to overcome the limitations by coming up with an idea that's simple yet allows a beautiful pattern to be built from it, in an abstract fashion that doesn't deny it's origins by trying to pretend to be reality. The game as an abstract idea, implemented on a skeleton, that requires a purity of thought to overcome the technical limitations.

I go back and play a game of Doom and it's really a bit crap. But when it I first played it, it was something else, in a good way! But it made little allowance for realism. It was hung on a framework of a pure idea, and then 'painted' over to resemble enough reality for our brains to add this to our 'real' map of reality inside us that presents our world to us. It could become a part of that with ease. there were rules to link it to reality, but because they were so obviously artificial constructs, when they failed to work it didn't matter once we'd learn the game rules. For example, the 'world' in Doom was presented in a '3D' fashion optically. But it wasn't at all 3D, it was as 2D as it gets, but it exploited our own brains' workings to make it appear that way! And yet, once we'd played a level, most of us automatically realised this, allowed for it, and found the experience still very compelling, maybe because of that? It was in it's way, as absorbing and involving as many modern and far more sophisticated simulations of our world.

I think that the pure ingenuity that people had to come up with to overcome those failings of hardware were what the essence of these games was or where it lay, now we often look, with the big titles, at trying to recreate something that already exists instead, and this has stolen something vital from the genre, but I'm not sure I can express that more precisely. Maybe it's that the more it tries to recreate reality, the more my mind compares with reality, rather than an idea expressed as a fake reality, without compromise or intention to delude, and the more my mind finds the inconsistencies subconsciously unappealing?

Or maybe you're right, age alone may be a factor, and all the above is just trying to deny that?
 

Eren

Well-Known Member
I'm playing Halo Reach, I recently discovered the Halo universe and I'm playing them all in order of release, I really love them (I'm only playing the campaign mode)
 

Slime_Punk

 Please erase
V.I.P Member
It seems like the nearer they get to realistic, the less they appeal, and the less clever they are. When they had to treat the hardware like a precious resource, not to make more realistic as seems the case these days, but to overcome the limitations by coming up with an idea that's simple yet allows a beautiful pattern to be built from it, in an abstract fashion that doesn't deny it's origins by trying to pretend to be reality. The game as an abstract idea, implemented on a skeleton, that requires a purity of thought to overcome the technical limitations.

I feel like I harp on this all the time, so IMHO you're definitely onto something. There really was something genuinely magical about games that never even tried to emulate real-world experiences, with 2D plaformers probably being one of my favorite examples. It was literally so abstract at the time, everything usually lacked a cohesive story (because, again, it's a game and who cares?!), and they had to constantly push boundaries (both in terms of hardware capabilities and even game difficulty levels) in order to keep up with the next dev team.

TBH though, I can go back to Doom, Quake, Blake Stone, Wolfenstein 3D, etc. Even though some were more of a "maze adventure" (as I jokingly refer to them) than others, the magic is still there for me for most games created between (roughly) 1989 - 1999.
 

Jorg

Well-Known Member
Several hehe. The House of Da Vinci 2, The Callisto Protocol but I'm now focused on F1 22, playing a season.
 

Neat Hedgehog

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Just started playing Cuinsineer. Very cute little roguelite game with a lot of little fetch quests, and very appetizing looking food artwork.

So far it seems very similar in concept to the old Recettear, or perhaps Moonlighter, but you run a restaurant instead of an item shop. Combat mechanics are basic but satisfying to begin with, and seem like they'll offer more variety once you get geared up.
 

Kavigant

Good Boy
V.I.P Member
I just started playing Death Stranding. Hideo Kojima may just be the mad genius I need right now.
 
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BrokenNeedle

I am among no one.
I had been wanting to get Ring Fit Adventure for a few years, but wasn't convinced I should spend $80 on it. Then the pandemic happened and you couldn't find the game in stores anywhere and it skyrocketed in price if you tried to buy it from a secondhand seller, so I had gave up and lost interest in it. Then earlier this month it finally made it on my radar again, so I gave in and bought it on eBay last week for a little under $45 and I've been playing that for the past few days. I don't know if I will stay committed to it, but I'd be happy if it just helps me shed a couple of pounds.

I haven't started it yet, but I'm going to be starting Remember Me on Steam sometime this week.
 

Slime_Punk

 Please erase
V.I.P Member
I had been wanting to get Ring Fit Adventure for a few years, but wasn't convinced I should spend $80 on it. Then the pandemic happened and you couldn't find the game in stores anywhere and it skyrocketed in price if you tried to buy it from a secondhand seller, so I had gave up and lost interest in it. Then earlier this month it finally made it on my radar again, so I gave in and bought it on eBay last week for a little under $45 and I've been playing that for the past few days. I don't know if I will stay committed to it, but I'd be happy if it just helps me shed a couple of pounds.

Wow, this looks awesome! I didn't know they made so many fitness and exercise games for the Switch.

I don't know how good the Christmas deals are on the digital store (I've only had my OLED since this year) but I almost want to bookmark all of the ones that don't need peripherals and pick them up if they go for cheap. Any additional excuse to jump around sounds like a really good time :)
 

BrokenNeedle

I am among no one.
Currently playing Need For Speed Heat. I'm enjoying it. Usually I just laugh off any lame attempt at putting a story in a racing game (I'm just here for the racing, I don't need a story), but for once this one is decent.

Also trying to go through all my PlayStation VR games before I upgrade to a PlayStation VR2 next month. Looking through my PSVR purchases really surprised me, I had no idea I had bought so many games for it over the past 6 years, and because I pretty much have to be in a certain mood to even want to play VR, most of them have gone unplayed over the years. But these days I'm finding myself in the mood to play VR more than I ever have been before, so I'm hoping to plow through these remaining games which I think there might be over 30 to go.

This is probably off-topic and for all I know there might be another thread asking this same question already, but are any of you familiar with any gaming focused YouTubers on the spectrum that you'd recommend?
 

BrokenNeedle

I am among no one.
Currently I'm in the middle of playing two games and they're both great.

First is Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart on PlayStation 5. The game is fun, and looks as good as it plays. This game actually made me think back to back in the day when Toy Story first came out in 1995 or 1996 and people were asking if video games could ever look this good. I wish I could go back in time and tell them that not only could we eventually match it, we've surpassed it.

The other game is the Resident Evil 4 remake, playing via PlayStation VR2. The game is good, as we've already known for the past 19 years since the original version released, but VR just makes it even better..
 

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