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Featured What makes it so someone with autism cant work?

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by An Arctic fox, Jul 10, 2019.

  1. An Arctic fox

    An Arctic fox Well-Known Member

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    I asked the question In the title but what factors make it so an autstic person is unable to work? I can see how sensory issues could lead to not being able to work in a normal job (stores) but I think other jobs would be avalible? So what makes it so an autstic person cant work?
     
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  2. Pats

    Pats Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    severe difficulties with social and occupational functioning. Not getting along well with others because others don't like you. Having a hard time letting your boss get away with things without calling them out for it. All kinds of stuff.
     
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  3. An Arctic fox

    An Arctic fox Well-Known Member

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    Oh ok well I do all of those
     
  4. Fino

    Fino Alex V.I.P Member

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    Executive functioning difficulty such as jobs involving counting money, doing multiple things at once, or being socially competent etc. difficulty working under pressure or for long hours or unexpected shifts or unexpectedly long shifts, difficulty dealing with people directing negative emotions toward you, general depression and anxiety preventing much of any activity, lack of motivation, difficulty getting a job in the first place...

    and probably much more!
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
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  5. An Arctic fox

    An Arctic fox Well-Known Member

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    I dont think I'd be able to work then, unless I worked another not normal job
     
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  6. inkfingers

    inkfingers 19 year old Aspie artist and Jesus follower

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    Like you said, sensory problems are a big one (for me), but also having to talk to people all day, or even just interacting with coworkers can be too stressful. I had to quit my part-time job because of Autistic burnout/shutdown. My brain just stopped working properly, like I had run out of batteries. Another time, I had an 8 hour shift, and had a meltdown in public, in front of all the customers. It was super embarrassing. Anyway, if I am looking to work full time after college, I'll have to find a quiet job or work from home.
     
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  7. An Arctic fox

    An Arctic fox Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I'll be similar
     
  8. Misery

    Misery Photo-Negative V.I.P Member

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    Utter social inability, terrible memory problems, lack of organization, easily overwhelmed by everything, total inability to handle long shifts. The fact that most jobs were utterly braindead didnt help... it just led to me spacing out even more.

    The ONE job I held for a long while involved working at a bank, in the closed off section that processes checks. I started out as data entry, and then after like 2 weeks they made the extremely nonsensical decision to have me run the machines that were the core of that whole section. I ran the check sorters, enormous, bat&^$# insane machines whose prime function seemed to be spazzing out and finding new and creative ways to shred checks or spray them into the air every 5 seconds or so. The constant lunacy kept me mentally engaged, so I did okay there. Other than that job though... no.

    I dont work anymore though, been a good 10 years since I last had to. Or is it more like 15? Heck if I know. But holy heck did I ever go through ALOT of different jobs back then.
     
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  9. An Arctic fox

    An Arctic fox Well-Known Member

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    Welp then I'm anxious and interested to see what happens for me
     
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  10. Misery

    Misery Photo-Negative V.I.P Member

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    Honestly, it's best to not worry about it so much beforehand. There's no way to know until you give it a go. Simply because it happened for a bunch of us in this place, doesnt mean that's how it'll go for you. And even if an interview or something doesnt go well? Doesnt mean that later attempts cant go just fine.

    Best advice I could give, research any potential job VERY carefully. Make sure you know EXACTLY what it's about, what it's like, and what you have to do there. Ask plenty of questions! And then think about it for awhile, make sure it's something you believe you could do. THEN, go and apply, if that all seems to work. And then you just see what happens from there!

    Good luck!
     
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  11. An Arctic fox

    An Arctic fox Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for the advice!
     
  12. Suzanne

    Suzanne Well-Known Member

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    Too many issues. Not only ASD, but ptsd; agoraphobia and chronic anxiety when normal day is interrupted.

    My therapst said that in fact, no employer would higher me, due to all that I go through and I do not have a licence and would have to rely on someone helping me.

    When it was suggested to be under the disabled label to receive help; I had two meltdowns. Not the notion of work itself, as I have cried when I thought I had a chance and it fell through; but the idea of change and trying to be a housewife too, was just way too much for me.

    Waiting now, to see if the government accepts helping me financially.
     
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  13. An Arctic fox

    An Arctic fox Well-Known Member

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    I hope they accept you financially
     
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  14. Baeraad

    Baeraad Well-Known Member

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    I do work, but I benefit from a special program where the government pays half my salary, and in return the company I work for makes some special allowances - in my case, accepting that I'm extremely stress-sensitive and should preferably not be given any hard deadlines, and that I have trouble "reading between the lines" but need very careful and specific instructions. I suppose that those two are my main obstacles for getting hired, along with the fact that I'm just very bad at looking for work - you're supposed to do it with contacts and networking, apparently, and I absolutely don't even know where to start with those two and so was limited to answering ads. In the end, I got a special social-worker-type-person who got me an interview and sat with me through it, so that helped.
     
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  15. Cazelle

    Cazelle Well-Known Member

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    I think the ability to work is a very individual thing. I feel that for myself, I am not very adaptive so would need a job and workplace that would be a good fit for me as it is. Add to that a supportive environment. Many people are still rather difficult to get on with and I don't need that in a place that I regularly need to go to.

    As it is I am not mentally in a space to be able to work right now (dealing with other mental health issues), but when the time comes, well, it seems a daunting task to find something that will work for me.
     
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  16. Gracey

    Gracey Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I'd agree with @Cazelle above in that your working life is an individual thing.

    I don't play well with a lot of others all at once but am okay with one or two every now and again.

    my environment matters to me. I can feel like I can't breathe if I'm in a closed, chaotic room.

    I like clear expectations.
    "here's your task/s and here's your deadline"
    let me figure out the most efficient way I work.
    (don't nag my ass. I'll ask questions if I need guidance)

    everyone is unique though. I guess it depends on level of functioning in certain environments, what you're used to, what interests you and tolerance levels?
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019
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  17. Pats

    Pats Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    However, I admire those that do work or, at least, have tried. I do understand it's difficult, but there's a variety of jobs out there. I was a nurse for 20 years - hated every single day of it, but I did it. Before that, I worked in sewing factories, at restaurants as a dishwasher, waitress (I can't do) and breakfast cook. I've worked in the lab at a vet clinic, worked in the back at a dry cleaners and worked in the office at a trucking company. I actually enjoyed the office job because I liked typing and filing and doing paperwork. Oh, my first job was at a small home factory making 8 track tapes. My boss became one of the few friends I ever had and sometimes she'd decide she didn't want to work any more for the day and we'd go shopping. But I didn't know I had the option to NOT work.
     
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  18. Vindicator Phoenix

    Vindicator Phoenix Female or neutral pronouns V.I.P Member

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    I currently work, during the night, at a grocery store. I don't mind it.

    I'd worked, during the daytime, for 2 months, before I discovered that I could work, during the nighttime. The daytime shift was horrible! The crowds of turbulent customers, the expected dexterity, and the abrupt customer questions irritated me.

    I could be sticking my head into a cold fridge, while my elbow holds open its door, loudly shoving ice cream tubs deep into bottom shelves when one, of many looming customers, abruptly asks a question I couldn't answer, so I'd have to pull out my head and make them repeat it. Then, I'd have to frantically scour the store for an experienced employee, while possibly getting questioned, by another customer, partway through the walk!

    I also hated: making eye contact with everyone, acting allistic, fulsomely reciprocating customers' "small talk," and getting called "Sir," which irritates me, as a non-male-gendered transgender person. I know that the customers defaulted to cisnormative gendering, and didn't intend to offend me, but here's an analogy. Imagine that every stranger who approaches you accidentally steps on your toe. I wouldn't blame them, for unintentionally hurting me, but after someone tramples your toe, every 5 minutes, the frequency and poignancy inevitably annoys. I could inform staff members that I knew of my preferred pronouns, and they'd learn to call me by them, because I'd consort with them regularly. Unfortunately, the company policy discourages criticizing customers; plus, the customers met me, for the first time, and therefore, presumed my pronouns.

    After 2 horrid months, of diurnal work, I got the opportunity to try working, during the night. After the first few hours, of my first night shift, I was already crusading to switch to it. That proved to be very wise.

    I primarily stock shelves, for 8 hours; the duration includes 30-40 minutes of break time that I can distribute, as I wish. I work with 1-4 kind, familiar coworkers, on a given night; half of our work is solitary and quite quiet. We can also: joke, curse, sing, yell, and be authentic. As long as we finish our work, by 8:00, in the morning, the management personnel don't care how we work. As a bonus, we don't need to wear uncomfortable uniforms, during the night; we can dress more authentically and comfortably. We don't even speak to any customers.

    Never would I say that I love my job, as I prefer sitting (and imagining) over labor. However, I'm saving money for post-secondary education. Someday, I'll be able to use my head more than my hands.

    As a final note, I got my job, through proving myself during a work placement, which came at the end of a workplace training program. The program was designed to help disadvantaged individuals ease into the workplace; I completed it, in 7 months (though some people stay in it, for 13 months). I discovered the program at a job search center. Guess what? I got the placement, and the job, without a resumé or an interview. I feel very lucky. The organization that helped me, from start to finish, was called Futureworx, which might exist only in Canada.

    I went from avoiding everyone (2015), to nearly committing suicide (2015 or 2016), to finding Futureworx (2017), to starting my training program (2018), to getting a job, in 2019. Hopefully, that imbues you with some hope, Arctic fox. Take your journey slowly, and if you can find supportive, patient people who are grateful for every small step you take, you'll make it.
     
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  19. Kyou Nukui

    Kyou Nukui music is amazing

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    I just find it impossible to not tell the boss when he's being an ass.jpeg hole.jpeg
     
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  20. Crossbreed

    Crossbreed Neur-D Missionary ☝

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    In a Buyer's-Market economy, I think that, more than racism or able-ism, the critical trait is ease of communication. (Employers are willing to set that aside in a Seller's-Market economy.)
     
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