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Did you have an IEP/ILP in school?


  • Total voters
    10
Please reply to this thread. I am from the US. In the US, the special education services are known as an IEP. In the UK, the special education services are known as an ILP.

As I am a high-functioning autistic, I had an IEP from preschool to high school. An IEP is given for students who have a disability (Autism, Asperger's Syndrome, ADHD, dyslexia, Tourette's Syndrome, etc). In university, there are accommodations for students like me through Disability Student Services. Remember, autism is not a disability, it is a different ability.:)

As I will be going to University of California, Irvine (UCI) in September 2022, I will have accommodations that will help me in university (extra time on assignments/tests, separate setting to reduce distractions, access to class notes, etc). I used these accommodations in high school.

I have slow handwriting, and most of the time, I could not finish tests within the time limit. Thankfully, since I had an IEP, I was given extra time for tests, and this helped. :)

Did you have an IEP/ILP in school?
 
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Leo Zed

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
In grade school, I had to take annual standardized exams. I would score 98-99th percentile in mathematics, but I would score in the single digits percentile on the verbal section. So when it came time for reading and English class, I would be pulled out of class and met with a specialist - a special ed teacher. Some years I would have to go to summer school. During my college years (after having been diagnosed with ADD), I worked with the Disability Support Services. Sometimes I had a tutor, but mostly I was given extra time to complete an exam in a distraction-free environment. I didn’t really need the extra time, but a distraction-free environment was essential.
 

Luca

charm & chaos
V.I.P Member
I had an IEP in school but I don’t think it was that helpful, because I feel like it made teachers pre-judge me.

In college I had a disability accommodation form that said I have to use a tablet or a computer to do assignments because I have difficulty with handwriting.
Most professors ignored this and forced me to handwrite everything, which really stressed me out.

My experience has been that a lot of schools and colleges don’t really care about helping disabled students and we’re just “a burden.” That might not be everyone’s experience but that’s how I was treated in school, kindergarten through college level. But I also grew up in a notoriously corrupt local education system that has a reputation for being ableist.
 

Isadoorian

Welcomer of Newcomers
V.I.P Member
I'm Canadian and had an IEP in School.

From what I remember, when I was in Elementary (grade school), I used a rubber grip on my pens & pencils, and had a slantboard to help me from not hunching over (didn't really work, as I'd do it anyway when I stopped using it). I was also allowed to use my laptop for writing most assignments as my hand would get sore/tired after some time (which still happens today).

In High School, some tests/exams were simplified for me, or I could even take them in a separate room; I was able to get some As and Bs in some classes which was a first, seeing as I was always a C/C+ kid. I honestly still feel Imposter Syndrome about that, as I feel I "didn't earn them legitimately".

I was also exempt from taking my End-of-Year Provincial Exams, which was a god send.
The only time I regret not asking for help, was when I had a 30-page Portfolio to do for my Law 12 class, and I meant to ask our teacher if I could do half of it for full marks as it was so daunting, but also because we had so much other school work being piled on us, though I didn't because I didn't feel it'd be fair to my fellow class mates.

My overall grade was a C-, which hurt a bit but I didn't really mind, as I took the class purely out of curiosity.
 

Ronald Zeeman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
My youngest son had this through, public and high school, finished college graduated as an electro-mechancal technologist. Now gainfully employed.
 

Gerald Wilgus

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
In school from the 50s through 70s, I was neither diagnosed or helped. People expected me to be normal. My deficits were primarily social.
 

Mills

Active Member
I did have an IEP, but since I was diagnosed so late, I only had it when I was in the 11th-12th grade. I always wondered what the outcome would’ve been like if I had gotten it when I was younger.
 

Qoyote

Well-Known Member
Sometimes I wish I was born a little earlier so I could live in "the good old days", then I remember "oh yeah, I'm autistic and bi..."

Had an IEP until I was 14, 504 through high school. Today there's a program at my college that offers autistic students planning/mental health meetings and a room to hang out and study. I've gotten a lot more independent this year thanks to them, more of a self-starter.

I had a communications class my first semester where I got accomodations under the table because the professor's daughter had a disability and she was sympathetic. Other than that I have been offered accomodations on assignments/tests but do not use them. That might change when we (probably) go back to in-person tests this semester.
 

Tom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I don't think IEPs had been invented yet, back then.

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;)
 

Crossbreed

Neur-D Missionary ☝️
V.I.P Member
My ASD2 & 3 kids had IEPs and were not in regular classes.
My (one recognized) ASD1 son had a "504 plan." That is, he was in regular classes, but they lightened his homework load and gave him more time for timed tests. He was allowed to take more advanced math classes at the same time.

He did not seek out such accommodations at his university. He graduated this year, but it may have lowered his GPA somewhat.
 
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Ken

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
No, I did not, and I think I’m glad I didn’t. Not because I think such programs are not good, but because I can’t imagine it being good at the school I went to. In fact, the school I went to had no clue about autism or any such condition. The term Autism was completely unknown, not just to the school, but within the community. The school was not friendly to anyone with any form of disability or difference.

This made school life for me a living hell, but I think that if there was any sort of special education service in that environment it would likely have be worse. I suffered almost continuous bullying, but the bullies were not other students – they were the teachers and school officials.
 

Au Naturel

Au Naturel
Please reply to this thread. I am from the US. In the US, the special education services are known as an IEP. In the UK, the special education services are known as an ILP.

As I am a high-functioning autistic, I had an IEP from preschool to high school. An IEP is given for students who have a disability (Autism, Asperger's Syndrome, ADHD, dyslexia, Tourette's Syndrome, etc). In university, there are accommodations for students like me through Disability Student Services. Remember, autism is not a disability, it is a different ability.:)

As I will be going to University of California, Irvine (UCI) in September 2022, I will have accommodations that will help me in university (extra time on assignments/tests, separate setting to reduce distractions, access to class notes, etc). I used these accommodations in high school.

I have slow handwriting, and most of the time, I could not finish tests within the time limit. Thankfully, since I had an IEP, I was given extra time for tests, and this helped. :)

Did you have an IEP/ILP in school?
They did not exist back then and there.
 

Qoyote

Well-Known Member
For the record most states have 1-4 colleges that have a program like the one I'm in. It's way more common than it was 10 years ago but not universal.
 

Stuttermabolur

A psychologist said so
V.I.P Member
My university has something of the sort, but as I haven't been diagnosed (which is a requirement), I never used it. I know an autistic guy who gets extra time on tests, as well as several people with ADHD/dyslexia and it sounds nice. I have only actively ran out of time during a test once or twice, but I was almost always there for the whole three hours (most often along with the same 2-3 students) when most people left at 2-2.5 hours and tend not to have time to revise my answers at the end. The main problem with extended test time is that since a lot of the students using it have anxiety issues or are doing badly, students sometimes burst into tears or give off noise, something I never experienced taking tests with the rest of the students in my class.
 

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