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Co-morbid Conditions Associated With Autism

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by pjcnet, Oct 27, 2017.

  1. pjcnet

    pjcnet Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    There are known medical conditions that are more commonly associated with people on the autistic spectrum, these are known as co-morbid conditions. Some well known co-morbid conditions are anxiety, depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and perhaps even sleep issues, but these are in my opinion conditions that are caused by the difficulties of controlling / living with autistic traits and are therefore not truly separate medical conditions in my opinion, then there are separately diagnosed co-morbid conditions such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) which are in my opinion autistic traits in themselves. Autism does however sometimes come bundled with other co-morbid conditions that some people may not expect such as epilepsy, bowel disease, neuroinflammation and immune disorders, tuberous sclerosis and more, please click here for more details on some co-morbid conditions that have been associated with autism.

    So I thought I'd start a thread where people can discuss their experiences of co-morbid conditions, but please remember that even though these conditions are more common in aspies, there's lots of aspies that don't suffer from any co-morbid conditions that aren't directly linked to autistic traits. I will start....

    My experience of co-morbid conditions:

    Firstly I have been diagnosed with depression / anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder which are both very common co-morbid conditions even though depression / anxiety is in my opinion caused by the issues of dealing with autistic traits, while obsessive compulsive disorder is an autistic trait.

    Like both my brothers when I was a very young child I used to suffer with epilepsy, I was too young to remember being affected myself, but I was old enough to remember my brother having epileptic fits as a slightly older child which was very frightening, once my brother started going blue before my mother cleared his airway and sometimes she got bitten. I also remember my mother speaking about how common epileptic fits / seizures were at my younger brother's special needs school. Apparently a few autistic children were so severe that they were having multiple seizures every single day and they even had to wear a padded helmet to help protect them. Both my brothers and I thankfully grew out of the condition, I stopped having fits when I was around 3 years old similarly to my slightly younger brother Daniel, but my youngest brother David didn't stop having fits until he was about 6 years old.

    The following isn't listed as a possible autistic co-morbid condition in the article I linked to earlier, but I was told that it is sometimes related to autism. I was born with mild spasticity in my back, this has caused back pain as an adult and I have never been able to bend my back fully. Even as a child, the closest I could ever come to touching my toes was my knees.

    I'm unsure whether this is possibly related to autism or not, but I was also born with a misshaped tongue which is particularly flat (not pointed) at the end. I was already extremely slow with speech development, but this further made it difficult for me to make certain sounds and I still have problems sounding my "R"s even today as an adult. When I was a child I was even scheduled for an operation to help correct the problem, although it was later cancelled because I started improving and making most sounds myself with the help of a specialised speech therapist.

    I was extremely slow to develop as a very young child, especially with speech (which means I now have high functioning autism), I started improving as I got older, although I kept many autistic traits, but both my brothers still have very low functioning autism (they still have issues with speech as adults, they also can't read, write or count to 5 and will need 24/7 care for the rest of their lives). I'm wondering whether some of the co-morbid conditions that are not directly associated to autistic traits are more common with low functioning autism and maybe even high functioning autism as opposed to aspies with asperger's syndrome (aspies that weren't slow to develop speech as a young child).

    Thanks for reading, and thanks in advance for any replies. :)
     
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  2. xudo

    xudo something

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    Depression, but to a minor degree really. I'm diagnosed with OCD, generalised anxiety disorder and Tourette's. I also have very mild dyslexia and pretty severe dyscalculia.
     
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  3. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Last edited: Oct 27, 2017
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  4. Crossbreed

    Crossbreed Neur-D Missionary ☝

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    • Pronounced to severe cognitive deficits (the basis for LFA) are co-morbid conditions. They are too frequent, but not required for an autism diagnosis.
    • Savantism could almost be considered a beneficial(?) co-morbid. [​IMG] (Interestingly, a related condition, Acquired Savant Syndrome, has been exhibited in some NT individuals as a consequence of brain disease or trauma.) Again, not required for an ASD diagnosis.
    • Speech & language deficits/delays, including mutism
    • Prosopagnosia [face-blindness]
    • Higher incidence of asthma, allergies & myopia (shared with the non-ASD gifted)
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2017
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  5. Gritches

    Gritches The Happy Dog V.I.P Member

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    Might I mention obesity and other health problems related to a higher chance of a sedentary lifestyle?
     
  6. AdultAspie69

    AdultAspie69 Active Member

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    diagnosed with anxiety and depression.
    Epilepsy - only been officially diagnosed in 2014 (only had auras before then)

    Dyspraxia, dyscalculia, memory issues, coordination/perception/sensory issues (can't stand tight binding clothing)
    possibly some learning disabilities.

    I Didn't start speaking till i was 3 or 4, even then i was mute most of the time.
    Speech problems (saying my R's/speech volume) still have this problem.

    My older sister also seems to have some echolalia.

    May also have neuroinflammation?
    Chronic sinus inflammation which causes my ear canals to become inflamed. Not sure if this is allergies or neuro.

    None of my doctors have wanted to be around me long enough to do any diagnosing, some of them seem to be afraid to get close to me, like i'm going to attack at any moment. I've never gotten aggresive with any of them. Could also be due to communication issues.
     
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  7. pjcnet

    pjcnet Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Yep, if the mods feel it's appropriate to merge the thread I'm happy, although this is thread is specifically about co-morbid conditions as well as any opinions on the subject, where the other is about any condition including conditions that are definitely not related.


    Yes indirectly it can be caused by autism and you will most likely find that statistically there's a high proportion of aspies that are obese or have other health problems related to a poor lifestyle, obesity is not a condition people are normally born with (unless there's another physical issue causing obesity), but it could still be argued that in some cases it's a co-morbid condition and thanks for your input.

    PS: I'm overweight and in my case the problems started after being diagnosed with an under-active thyroid, however even with treatment I still struggle to lose weight, something I didn't have an issue with before. I didn't mention my thyroid issue however since as far as I know it's inherited instead of being co-morbid because my mother has the same condition (who isn't autistic) and so do a few other family members.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2017
  8. Fitzo

    Fitzo Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I have suffered chronic depression anxiety and insomnia since my late teens/early 20's. Whilst I'm sure AS has been largely responsible for these, I also think my disfunctional family environment growing up and ongoing issues with my narcissist mother have significantly contributed as well.

    Also have volume control problems and hypersensitivity to sounds.
     
  9. Amy Susan Rose

    Amy Susan Rose Mitakuye Oyasin

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    Bipolar disorder and an autoimmune disorder. I received all the crappy genes in the family.
     
  10. Idahocalypse

    Idahocalypse Ravenpaw

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    In addition to ASD I have also been diagnosed with OCD and panic disorder. I can assure you that OCD is very different from ASD. For example ASD obsessions (or "special interests") fill you with a sense of all-encompassing joy and provide a sense of comfort and stability in a world that feels chaotic and filled with uncertainties.

    On the other hand, OCD obsessions only contribute to the feeling that the world is a chaotic place. It makes you feel that not even your own mind is a safe place because it fills you with so many disturbing intrusive thoughts that you feel like a monster in human flesh.
     
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  11. Streetwise

    Streetwise very cautious contributor V.I.P Member

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    Same here
     
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