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Tom

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1620531644_QAUCK.gif
 

tree

Blue/Green
Staff member
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She really has a total of 8 chicks.
The other three aren't visible in this picture.

These are from the first batch that hatched this summer.

1658856152974.png
 

tree

Blue/Green
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Mary Terry

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Help! One of our backyard chickens has worms. It shows up as a disgusting long white membrane inside her egg. We don't know which chicken is affected so we tried to feed de-wormer food to all six chickens. They don't like to eat it although I feel like we have nearly starved them for 3 days, trying to force them to eat the de-worming food.

Can anyone please recommend something we can put in their water? A maintenance dose of de-wormer in their water would be a lot easier than trying to dose them (or one of them) only when worms appear.
 

Yeshuasdaughter

You know, that one lady we met that one time.
V.I.P Member
@Mary Terry , They'll eat if they get hungry enough.

I think it also extremely prudent to separate out the sick birds into isolation cages, before you have a true epidemic.
 
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Foggy

Member
Hi, my family has chickens! We have americauna, silkie mix and cochin as well as others that I'm not sure of the breeds. They are very cute. I love them a lot.
 

Mary Terry

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@Mary Terry , They'll eat if they get hungry enough.

I think it also extremely prudent to separate out the sick birds into isolation cages, before you have a true epidemic.

We don't know which chicken has worms so we can't isolate her. Chickens get worms from their outdoor food sources such as crickets and grasshoppers they eat. Intestinal worms aren't communicable between chickens as far as I know!

We're getting new baby chickens soon. My husband has to dispose of the old ones or we'll just start letting them loose in the pasture where coyotes and hawks eventually will get them. I usually just let old hens hang around as pets and don't eat their eggs, but I don't want to spread chicken diseases by introducing the young birds to the old ones. You gotta have thick skin to deal with chickens. Hubby has a "humane" funnel kind of thing he puts them in and then off with their heads! The buzzards like the leftovers. (I hide in the house when he does it)

Sorry if that is too much info!
 

tree

Blue/Green
Staff member
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The chickens that were on the upper roosts in the coop this evening.
There are 13 others.

1672529854809.png
 

Yeshuasdaughter

You know, that one lady we met that one time.
V.I.P Member
I have a friend who lives in a remote location. They would like to have chickens, rabbits, goats, and other stock, as well as a garden.

Their property occasionally plays host to foxes, deer, and even bears, as well as other wildlife, which makes agriculture very difficult to maintain. Anything yummy is food to wildlife.

Does anyone know of economical solutions to this wildlife problem? Maybe recommend a good chicken house/tractor, deer fencing, and other anti-predator steps my friend can take?
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
Staff member
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I have a friend who lives in a remote location. They would like to have chickens, rabbits, goats, and other stock, as well as a garden.

Their property occasionally plays host to foxes, deer, and even bears, as well as other wildlife, which makes agriculture very difficult to maintain. Anything yummy is food to wildlife.

Does anyone know of economical solutions to this wildlife problem? Maybe recommend a good chicken house/tractor, deer fencing, and other anti-predator steps my friend can take?
Perhaps a well trained guard dog or two?
 

tree

Blue/Green
Staff member
V.I.P Member
I have a friend who lives in a remote location. They would like to have chickens, rabbits, goats, and other stock, as well as a garden.

Their property occasionally plays host to foxes, deer, and even bears, as well as other wildlife, which makes agriculture very difficult to maintain. Anything yummy is food to wildlife.

Does anyone know of economical solutions to this wildlife problem? Maybe recommend a good chicken house/tractor, deer fencing, and other anti-predator steps my friend can take?

Electric fence is useful.

A low wire around a chicken coop is very discouraging to
raccoons and possums.
 

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