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How do I pass my first job interview?

VictorR

Random Member
V.I.P Member
Dress: standard "rule of thumb" is one step better than the job you're applying for. So in most cases, business casual, and if you're applying for a professional position, then business formal.

As for what to say, focus on your experiences, skills, and strengths and how they would benefit the organization you're interviewing with.

If prompted with a negative question, try to turn things around by discussing your efforts to turn improve yourself. An example might be:
Q. "Tell me about a weakness."
A. "I get nervous when talking to others, but I have been trying to get better at that and last year I look a public speaking course at Anytown College to assist with that, and welcome opportunities to deliver presentations so I can get better at them."

Also, bring extra copies of your resume/CV/application and a sheet with your references on it, along with copies of work samples if you have any.
 

Aspychata

Serenity waves, beachy vibes
V.I.P Member
Hey good luck. Just practice answering questions in front of a mirror. One thing, don't over talk the answer. Like tell me about yourself- they just want a short little info plug, not 20 min talk of your special interests, or talking about negative things. Let them lead the conversation.. If you panic, just say what was the question again? When they repeat the question, that buys you a few more minutes. When they pause, l sometimes ask, what is your ideal employee? This gives me a chance to judge the position by what they are asking for. Smile alot, sit straight, if you can't stare at their eyes, look at the middle of their eyebrows. :)
You got this.
Groomed, clean nails, clean shoes, not wrinkled clothes, and not anything with an overpowering smell.
 
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Outdated

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
What does that look like?
It depends a lot on what country you live in and what people's standard dress codes are like, but VictorR's response is a good one.

For a sales or clerical job I would wear a clean and pressed collared shirt and dress trousers and black shiny shoes.
For a factory or labouring position I would wear the same shirt but with jeans and steel capped boots.

I can still remember my first job interviews, they didn't go so well and looking back I feel embarrassed about a couple of them, but with practice you get better at them. Don't let it stress you too much, there's always more jobs you can apply for.
 

Shaddock

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Dress: standard "rule of thumb" is one step better than the job you're applying for. So in most cases, business casual, and if you're applying for a professional position, then business formal.
all my job interviews so far were "business casual", so I weard a good looking chino pants, a normal t-shirt and a plain shirt over it. most other applicants weared the same. (men)

Also, bring extra copies of your resume/CV/application and a sheet with your references on it, along with copies of work samples if you have any.
in my case I don´t needed that, because I always had to apply via e-mail or online on their website, so there was no need to bring something in paper with me, because they already had a copy and usually they print out the e-mail or online application + documents.

they only sometimes asked me to bring the certifications to the interview, but most don´t needed that. I always just sent everything I have and want to send in the online application to them.

maybe also add (in the interview) your interests and hobbys. sports and something intellectual is always the best. better not casual hobbys like travelling, meeting friends or watching movies or playing video games.
 

Yeshuasdaughter

You know, that one lady we met that one time.
V.I.P Member
You are a product. Market yourself.

Be punctual, polite, well dressed, articulate, and have your resume ready in a folder at your side.

Market past experiences to the interviewer. Even if you haven't ever obtained paid employment, in the past, tell the interviewer about related school activities, volunteer work, or even chores that are related to the field in which you are applying.

Be the best product on the shelf, in essence, so that your future employer will want to invest time and money into you.
 

paloftoon

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
It's okay to ask the place you're interviewing for beforehand if business casual is appropriate for dress if you aren't sure. If you don't have time to ask, this is a good assumption, but of course better to ask (in the manner I'm telling you) rather than not at all if you aren't sure.

If you simply ask "how should I dress for the interview", it might seem you're too simple minded . I don't think it would be a deal breaker, but if you're being considered for a more complex, responsible role, they are more likely to consider you for an entry level role. Even if you are going for an entry level role, even if you aren't actually sophisticated normally, if you can appear this way, this can help most of the time as long as the other parties don't feel like you're berating them or something negative.

One time, I had applied for an industrial company and got an interview, and they actually wanted me to be dressed in a t-shirt for the in-person interview step because they had a lot of industrial machines around and this is the kind of environment I'd be in if I was selected for the job.
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member
Confidence! Do what you can to find a lot of it and put yourself in a state of it going into the interview.

Seriously, managing your anxiety here will be key because staying as emotionally calm and confident as possible will keep your brain engaged to be thinking about all the great advice above and what you should or should not be saying.

Do whatever things it takes leading up to the interview like deep breathing, affirming yourself and your talents or just listening to music that pumps you up and makes you feel good. Great advice all around here on the thread, but also put yourself in a state of confidence if you can.

Good luck. I think job interviews suck, but when treated like a solvable puzzle or a game, maybe they are more bearable and manageable.
 

Aspychata

Serenity waves, beachy vibes
V.I.P Member
Let us know how the interview went, how you feel you did.

Personally l hate interviews. :(
What's worse, the dentist or an interview?
 
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Richelle-H

Relaxed Relativity Inspector
V.I.P Member
Having been through more interviews than I care to remember, be calm and as confident as you can be in the situation. It is not anything more than a casual chat where you have the ability to sell your strengths. Any interview you undertake requires a confidence in your own abilities and special talents. If you sell yourself based on your knowledge of self, then things tend to go more towards the positive than the negative.

Answer any questions posed to you succinctly and without too much overelaboration. You are selling a product which just happens to be your abilities and how those fit in with the job you are applying for and nothing more. Relax and do not show your nervousness if you can do that.

Good luck and I hope your interview goes well.
 

VictorR

Random Member
V.I.P Member
And a bump for an thread from last year that also has some goodies

 

Shevek

Well-Known Member
How should I present myself aesthetically? What kind of things should I (not) say?
The answer to that is 'it depends." If there is only one job opportunity you are interested in, go apply to several others just for the experience, and turn them down if necessary. If there are many openings in your field, don't plan on taking the first one available - shop for a place where you will be comfortable and effective. You can ask questions, and the employer will appreciate it if you are interested in finding a symbiotic relationship, not just a checque for whatever they can get you to do.
 

Yeshuasdaughter

You know, that one lady we met that one time.
V.I.P Member
Having been through more interviews than I care to remember, be calm and as confident as you can be in the situation. It is not anything more than a casual chat where you have the ability to sell your strengths. Any interview you undertake requires a confidence in your own abilities and special talents. If you sell yourself based on your knowledge of self, then things tend to go more towards the positive than the negative.

Answer any questions posed to you succinctly and without too much overelaboration. You are selling a product which just happens to be your abilities and how those fit in with the job you are applying for and nothing more. Relax and do not show your nervousness if you can do that.

Good luck and I hope your interview goes well.
OMG Richelle! I've missed you!
 

paloftoon

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Oh another thing for an interview is try your best to not only keep your answers short, but to be specific, but not too personal unless asked to be personal. For instance, if they ask about something in your background that could help the job you're applying for now, you can mention your background.

When you mention specific examples, avoid names of other people and organizations you worked with. Just say things like "an employee", or "this organization".

But maybe add something like I once helped a customer do this/that independently and it solved this issue so that it didn't become a problem. I can be appropriately proactive in similar situations if you hire me for your company. Something to that effect if possible. Stay as authentic as you can be because people can see right through. It's not meant to be easy. My best wishes for you.
 

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