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Equal Opportunities in the UK!

Mr Allen

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Topic.

IMO it means nothing, they just trot out the "We are an equal opportunities employer" line because they legally have to, they don't actually adhere to it.

Like I applied to Argos last week, and didn't get the job, probably because I declared that I'm Aspie and have other disabilities.

Legally they can't and shouldn't do this IMO, is there a loophole in the law they're using to get away with it?

I have that interview on Monday anyway.
 
There's no legal loophole, because they don't need one. They can just give any other reason for not employing someone.

That's not to say that every time someone with a disability doesn't get a job, that the reason was their disability.

Even before I was diagnosed with anything, I applied for many jobs and was turned down or didn't hear back for most of them. Ultimately, there are a lot of people applying for each job (especially at this time of year as most places are taking on Christmas temps) and the employer is always looking for the best candidate from the pool of applicants.

Maybe don't dwell on the one's you were unsuccessful with and look towards the interview you have coming up, and other opportunities that may come along in the future.
 
Like I applied to Argos last week, and didn't get the job, probably because I declared that I'm Aspie and have other disabilities. Legally they can't and shouldn't do this IMO, is there a loophole in the law they're using to get away with it?

Don't you think it's about time you altered the equation? Use your deductive reasoning and leave out your neurodiversity. See if it makes a difference. Work the problem, Rich. And consider other jobs which may be outside your comfort zone. It's unrealistic to seriously rely on the strength of civil laws allegedly designed to protect certain groups of people.

Prospective employers don't need a legal loophole to deny you employment. It's just a matter of them being sufficiently clever enough in how they turn you down. Not to mention the obvious. Civil laws only have a "bite" if one chooses to litigate an alleged civil wrong. Most unemployed people earnestly looking for work simply do not have the time or money to sidetrack themselves over a lawsuit. Even if you secure pro-bono legal support.

Yes- "equal opportunities" means nothing in the big picture. Ok- now you know. So it's up to you to become equally clever to get around such barriers rather than depend on a legal system that only protects you in name only.
 
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I suspect, if you applied for the "front line" post, that they are worried that you will cause customers to stop buying! It is all about money making and although I did say that corportations are less likely to be prejudice, that does not take into account greedy ones, who have a definite idea of who they want to work for them, especially if in the public secter.

I applied once for a job at Marks and Spencers. It was actually a position to advise people on the best cut of clothing for them etc, but as soon as I was handed a sheet to do mathmatics, I knew I would not get the job.

In fact, I was told that it was an absolute shame that I am so bad at maths, because they would snap me up, but they could not risk it, as I would be required to go on the tills, which is all very well, but what if the tills stopped working and I have a line of people in front, can I do it by hand? Nope, so therefore, they could not hire me.
 
Topic.

IMO it means nothing, they just trot out the "We are an equal opportunities employer" line because they legally have to, they don't actually adhere to it.

Like I applied to Argos last week, and didn't get the job, probably because I declared that I'm Aspie and have other disabilities.

Legally they can't and shouldn't do this IMO, is there a loophole in the law they're using to get away with it?

I have that interview on Monday anyway.

I can understand your frustrations Rich,
But do you have solid evidence the above is what actually happened?

Is there an opportunity in which to email the company and ask for feedback?
I'm not sure it's usual to get feedback from just the application process, I think the feedback is given after the unsuccessful interview but what can it hurt?

You may waste 30 minutes of your life composing a polite email asking for feedback on how best to present your c.v as a disabled candidate on the spectrum in order to be considered for a role within the company and hear nothing from them?
What have you lost ? (other than 30 minutes)
 
I'm not sure it's very productive to just assume that they're not considering you due to disability. I think the UK average is around 25 jobs applied for for each interview you get. I agree with Gracey that you should ask for feedback, and in future try not disclosing during the application process. When I was looking for a job I disclosed or didn't disclose on application forms at random at saw no pattern in which ones I got interviews for, so not everyone just discriminates.
 
I agree that just because you didn't make the cut doesn't mean you were discriminated against.
There were likely a large number of candidates and you weren't in the final round.

Equal Opportunities means they won't refuse to even consider you if you are in some way disabled. It means you will be considered alongside everyone else, not that you will somehow get more consideration as that would be discrimination against non disabled peeps.

Sorry :(
 
Equal Opportunities means they won't refuse to even consider you if you are in some way disabled. It means you will be considered alongside everyone else, not that you will somehow get more consideration as that would be discrimination against non disabled peeps.

Exactly. It's why IMO one must sell themselves rather than their disabilities to any prospective employer. Otherwise I'd suspect that most private-sector employers would take offense of anyone who might project any perceived sense of entitlement in a job interview.
 
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