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Any teachers here?

Discussion in 'Education and Employment' started by BobbyTheEmperor, Feb 22, 2021.

  1. BobbyTheEmperor

    BobbyTheEmperor New Member

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    Hi! Any teachers here?

    If so, how do you function best as a teacher. Do you have any difficulties and if so, how do you cope with them?

    If I knew what I was getting myself into when I started my studies I might have chosen an other profession to be honest. As it is now, I have to deal with things.

    If there are any teachers here, do you get burnouts and have to call in "sick" because you simply can't take more things in?

    My thing is I work really well about two full weeks/month. Then the two others I work almost as good but finally I get a cold physically (and have to call in sick). So I have at least one cold/month now. And I think it is from stress.
    Anyone else experience the same thing?

    The spring is coming here in Sweden so I expect a turn in mood soon (for the better). As I am writing I hear birds and the sun is shining and I even saw flowers yesterday, it really cheered me up! And this weekend there were news of migrating birds coming back! :D Love the time of year which is about to begin!

    Anyway, back to the topic. How do you cope when things, when it gets too much? I don't have a formal diagnosis so can't say to my manager: "I suspect I might be on the spectrum and than makes work more difficult in some ways."

    Kind Regards P
     
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  2. paloftoon

    paloftoon Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I used to be a teacher, and thinking about going back, but to cyber school. If you work in something comparable to an urban school environment in the US, it's perfectly acceptable to take a day off once in awhile for emotional distress. Usually, just say you aren't feeling well. If you're asked by the school for proof, go to the doctor and be honest about your situation. Get a doctor's note and submit it to your school. If you're prescribed psychological medicine and you don't want to take it, then don't, because depending on your doctor, they might prescribe you something because they think you are slightly crazy but ultimately, you choose if you should take this or not.
    I had a doctor who did this to me one time- so that's why I mention it. I only took something unknowingly for a few days. Then I looked it up and stopped taking it.

    Of course, I'm not a doctor, nor can a person make professional medical advice on here- so, choose what you want to do at your own risk.

    Good luck in what you choose.
     
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  3. Neonatal RRT

    Neonatal RRT Well-Known Member

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    I am an adjunct instructor at a university. I love teaching. I would do it for free. However,...and a big however,...a single day, probably 5-6 hours of lecture and labs,...will trash my brain. If I am lucky enough to have the next day off,...I am a walking zombie,...2hr nap in the afternoon exhausted. For myself, as much of a positive experience I get out of teaching while doing it,...it has a price. I have the past few months started taking a regimen of antioxidants (NAC, SAM-e, CoQ10, Vitamin C) with my lunch to help my brain with the mental exhaustion, at it has noticeably helped, but not 100%.

    I also work full-time as a respiratory therapist at a busy metropolitan children's hospital neonatal unit. That will trash my brain, as well.

    I think, the biggest thing for me is managing my diet and supplement regimen to deal with my brain's physical health, as well as, making sure I get some serious good sleep. I am in bed by 9pm most days,...keep in mind, I am usually up by 4:30am to go to work. If I have a day off, still bed by 9pm and sleep until 7:30-8:00am.
     
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  4. BobbyTheEmperor

    BobbyTheEmperor New Member

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    What are these vitamins you are talking about? it sounds interesting! have to research this :)
     
  5. paloftoon

    paloftoon Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Exercise, quality sleep, staying hydrated, and good diet will help the most. Anything extra can help, but may be more temporary.
     
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  6. OkRad

    OkRad μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος οὐλομένην V.I.P Member

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    You have my respect. I would have loved to have been a teacher. I hope some here can give you tips
     
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  7. Neonatal RRT

    Neonatal RRT Well-Known Member

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    Do a Google Scholar or PubMed search on:

    N-acetyl cysteine, SAM-e, CoQ10, methyl-B12, methyl-folate, L-theanine, melatonin, probiotics,...and autism. Melatonin,...a hormone that, in part, helps with sleep, is often low in autistics. L-theonine,...an amino acid that only comes from supplements and dietary sources,...is an effective glutamine blocker,...decreases anxiety and repetitive behaviors. Often in autistics, there are areas of the brain that are in a state of "over excitement" because the GABA (inhibitory) - to - glutamine (excitatory) balance is shifted towards the excitatory side. Block the glutamine a bit,...may put some things in a better balance. Autistics often have a genetic condition that inhibits the proper methylation process to metabolize B vitamins (that in part, aid in energy metabolism). The "methyl" folate and B12s are already methylated,...and now the body can use them. Antioxidants are often helpful because of this state of "over excitement" in the brain,...reactions are occurring at a higher rate,...oxidative damage can occur, leading to mental exhaustion, cell damage and death, decreased immune function, etc. NAC and SAM-e contain sulfur and helps liver function as well as neurotransmitter production,...but are also very powerful antioxidants. Probiotics often help some autistics as many have "gut issues" due to their preferred, but somewhat restricted diet, leading to preferential overgrowth of a few bacteria in the GI tract. By supplementing "good bacteria" in the GI tract, enhancing the "mix", some issues with irritable bowel and reflux can be minimized,...not to mention, some neurotransmitters are created within the GI tract.

    It's about taking a multi-path approach towards maintaining neuronal health and neurotransmitter balance.
     
  8. BobbyTheEmperor

    BobbyTheEmperor New Member

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    Oh, wow. Thank you! I try but it is difficult. Maybe because I can’t do half good. It’s all or nothing so I go all in and then I get so tired I get sick (or have to call in sick to eat and sleep). After about 2-3 days I’m ok.

    Plus side of Covid and living in Sweden - in my region we have to have the parent, pupil development meetings by phone or Zoom. It is so nice doing things in an other way!

    Thank you! You’re all so kind in here! I was afraid when I became a member because maybe I’m not on the spectrum but wow. You’re all so kind!
     
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  9. BobbyTheEmperor

    BobbyTheEmperor New Member

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    Thank you! Is it ok If I copy paste your answer (without your Account name of course) and put it in my notes on my computer?
    This is really interesting.

    I have had problems with fatigue as long as I can remember and I tried to find out why when I was 21 but never got to an answer.

    I have tried melatonin before and it was good! I have problems falling asleep or staying sleeping which is a negative (because I need more sleep than the average person to function).

    I Will read more about this. If this is sth that might work and help...wow! :D
     
  10. Major Tom

    Major Tom Searching for ground control... V.I.P Member

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    I'm also a teacher. It can really burn a person out, yet also be very rewarding. I think the key is to look at the good things that are happening and try to not focus on the bad.

    Also, try and enjoy yourself, and if you can leave your work at work and try not to think of your job when you are back home.

    The other replies were also excellent suggestions.
     
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  11. Thinx

    Thinx Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I taught in Further education when I was your age, then later in Higher education. I was more affected by tiredness in my youth, I think that was partly due to all the rest of life that can seem stressful and hard to manage especially in 20s and 30s. Well, 40s too a bit...

    It could be easier now you suspect autism is part of the issue. You definitely need downtime, but hopefully you can manage things as best you can to rest and feel better outside work.

    You might consider working with adults, including taking a further qualification if needed, or related work like teacher training or tutoring? I trained as a counsellor, fab to do, and later trained counsellors. Or consider working for an exam board? What's your subject, or do you teach young ones?
     
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