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Featured Ten positive traits of autism

Discussion in 'Friends, Family & Social Skills' started by Mia, May 14, 2019.

  1. Mia

    Mia Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    https://www.cbc.ca/parents/learning...-positive-traits-that-people-with-autism-have

    1. Autistic people are extremely passionate about what interests them.

    An attribute that translates to hyper focusing and researching those interests until they have a deep understanding of the subject matter. They also have a wide variety of interests.

    2. They are straightforward, direct and honest.
    They mean what they say and aren't afraid to tell you what they truly think.

    3. Autistic people perceive the world differently and process information in unique ways.
    As a result, they are independent and creative thinkers.

    4. They are detail-oriented and they pay attention to the finer details that others often miss.


    5. They love routines and will happily maintain those routines with great success.

    6. People with autism have a good memory and an amazing ability to recall facts.


    7. Autistic people also tend to be visual thinkers.
    As a result, they can visualize solutions to problems, as well as other things, better than most people can.

    8. They follow their own unique set of social rules, which means they often don't bully people, judge others or get easily swayed by peer pressure.

    They don't feel the pressure to fit in like most people do. I bet most people wished they had these attributes!

    9. Autistic people are smart.
    Many have above-average intelligence. Yes, even pre-verbal or non-verbal autistic people! This is where I insert my reminder about always presuming competence...

    10. Autistic people aren't afraid to be themselves.
    They're unique and quirky, and don't get bothered by what other people think of them. They just continue to be the unique individual they are by embracing and sharing their passions with the world.


    Note: This is written by a Mother, raising high functioning autistic children. It is general.

    Comments? Can you add any more positives?
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
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  2. Nervous Rex

    Nervous Rex High-functioning autistic V.I.P Member

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    That's a very complimentary list, but they're generalizations.

    #7 is definitely not true for me. I can't hold a picture in my head to save my life. My brain is hard-wired for text. I can see (in my mind's eye) passages of books I've read recently well enough to quote them verbatim. On a few occasions, I recalled code I was working on well enough to debug it while away from the computer. But not pictures. If I stare at a picture and then close my eyes and try to recall it, it's like it washes out and dissolves - the more I try to focus on it, the less detail I get.
     
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  3. Fridgemagnetman

    Fridgemagnetman I only have one V.I.P Member

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    I used to be a bit like that but it faded to just being shapes of the writing on the pages.

    About as useless for exams as nothing.
     
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  4. Mia

    Mia Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I'm the same, words are what I remember as well as numbers. Yet I can visualize, probably because I'm an artist how things appear in three-dimensions. Like a blueprint, and I wouldn't call them pictures more like outlines than photographs.
     
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  5. Nervous Rex

    Nervous Rex High-functioning autistic V.I.P Member

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    Me too. I'm good with spatial relations. I find it easiest to explain in computer graphics terms: I can do wire frames, but not textures.
     
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  6. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Hmmmmmmmm.

    Yes, by and large they are generalizations. I agree with some, and must qualify others to varying extents.

    1. "Check".
    2. Straight forward and direct, yes in most cases. Absolutely honest I think would be a stretch. We aren't Vulcans, and even Spock was more than capable of exaggerating when it suited him.
    3. Somewhat ambiguous, but in general I agree.
    4. "Check". Or at least it certainly resonates in my case.
    5. "Check".
    6. Whoa, Sparky. I suppose that depends on both their short and long term memory capabilities. And whether their recollection involves a "special interest" which certainly helps.
    7. Visual thinkers? I'd have to qualify this one too. In general it can apply to myself, but as I agreed with Rex in another post, when it comes to things like navigation instructions, I need them in text- not images.
    8. Another one to qualify, having made many personal observations here over how many of us often fret about not fitting in or judging others.
    9. Autistic people are smart. Perhaps the ultimate stereotype. When in reality some are, and some aren't. It also matters in terms of the context of what one considers to be "smart".
    10. Nope, nope, nope. If we were all so emboldened to be ourselves, none of us would be honing our skills at masking our autistic traits and behaviors.

    If anything I have to consider the context of the person who created this list. A parent, like most who may be apt to view their child in the best possible light.

    -Whether it's true or not.
     
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  7. Nervous Rex

    Nervous Rex High-functioning autistic V.I.P Member

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    Yup.
     
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  8. BraidedPony

    BraidedPony Just Enjoying Survival V.I.P Member

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    i have found that we are more apt to be passionate about animals and nature in general.
    just my observation, and certainly true of me.
     
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  9. clg114

    clg114 Still crazy, after all these years. Staff Member V.I.P Member

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    While this list may be a generalization, it pretty much describes me. Except for #6. My long term memory is just fine. I can remember things that happened 65+ years ago with out a problem. However, remembering what I did yesterday requires some extra thought and it is getting worse. I believe that this has more to do with age than autism. Getting old isn't for sissies.
     
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  10. Mia

    Mia Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    True of me as well.
     
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  11. Mia

    Mia Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Highly likely that she's also considering her children before they make their way in the world. These qualities are advantageous under ideal conditions, and hopefully they retain many of them throughout. Yet our existence in the world does enact something of a toll on our interests and abilities.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
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  12. Tom

    Tom Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    One thing that came to mind was that I am very good at finding things. I remember the last place I saw anything (up to several years) and if someone else misplaced something can mentally remember their actions and recreate the movements they made to locate things, or come up with likely predictions. Its funny because my NT wife and daughter are simply terrible at it. Sometimes they literally can not find something even when looking right at it.

    An aspect of visual thinking? Deetails?
     
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  13. Kevin1968

    Kevin1968 Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Whatever about the stereotypical nature of the above list, perhaps a longer list of positive traits could be useful for those who are newly diagnosed etc.,

    We often only see negative things in our lives and having the positives highlighted can be uplifting.
     
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  14. Mia

    Mia Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I'm really good at that as well, yet my husband has difficulty finding things. Conversation four weeks ago: "Remember when we moved (over fifteen years ago) and you packed the computer room? There was a piece for my guitar, a red plastic capo, have you seen it since?"

    Recall packing that room, it's a bit like a film with blurry images. Visualize my hands, placing items in boxes. Taping and writing on the boxes. Unpacking the boxes, remember placing guitar related items in a wooden box and putting them on a shelf.

    Tell him where it might be, he goes to look and finds it. Yet I can't remember phone numbers, addresses, or peoples names, He can. I guess we both have our abilities.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
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  15. Tom

    Tom Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Same with me exactly. I have trouble remembering my own phone number.
     
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  16. Nervous Rex

    Nervous Rex High-functioning autistic V.I.P Member

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    I suck at that. When I'm doing work around the house, I can lose a tool in about 0.7734 seconds.

    Question: Where did I put the wrench I was just using to tighten up the chair legs?
    Answer: On top of the fridge.
    Explanation: I have none.

    Also, my wife and I joke that the best place to hide something from me is in plain sight. It's guaranteed I'll never find it there.
     
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  17. Peter Morrison

    Peter Morrison Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I like this post because I like being reminded that our quirks have a special value. I also think these same qualities are responsible for us getting into trouble with conventional systems, methods, and cooperative efforts. We don't act, think, or do like others, making us weird and peculiar in the minds of the NT world. We can accomplish goals and make contributions by going our own way, but it makes people nervous when they don't understand our methods. There are many places in our world where our extreme behaviors produce superior results. This added value is usually only appreciated by people who know us well because they have seen us in action and trust us. To the rest of the world, we're just weird.
     
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  18. Gracey

    Gracey Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Mobile phones and landlines (UK) have 11 digits.

    Break it down into two strings of information.

    Five numbers, then six numbers.
    (rather than 11 all at once)

    If you can 'see' any patterns, shapes or repetition of number on recall, so much the better.
    Might make it easier to remember.

    How many times do you dial your own number to talk to yourself? :)
    Easy to understand how one might not remember their own phone number.
     
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  19. tlc

    tlc The Mackinac Bridge and U.P. is my happy place.

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    Autistic people often have overactive senses. While it is often a curse, it can be of help at times. For example when it was quiet, going by hearing and feel I could tell when a car was coming up the road from a mile away. Such a trait might be useful for a watchguard, or maybe a hunter. Or even one who diagnoses and fixes things.
     
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  20. Tony Ramirez

    Tony Ramirez Christian with Asperger's Syndrome

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    Number 9 is a load of crock. I had a C- average in junior and high school and a D F average college dropout. Matter of fact I ruled out Asperger back then because of that stereotype.

    As for the other ones I agree but many are not positives really what is so great when you have too socializing with dumb small talk.

    Thrn the overactive senses are annoying. I don't mind the enhanced smelling but the hearing is annoying. I wear Shune earbuds and medium volume yet I can still hear the loud cars and crowds.
     
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