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Question for non-Christians...

Discussion in 'Religion' started by Greatshield17, May 3, 2021.

  1. Greatshield17

    Greatshield17 An Appeal to Heaven! V.I.P Member

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    Thanks, here’s the Mysteries of the Rosary as follows:

    The Joyful Mysteries:
    The Annunciation: Bible Gateway passage: Luke 1:26-38 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition
    The Visitation: Bible Gateway passage: Luke 1:39-56 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition
    The Nativity: Bible Gateway passage: Matthew 2:1-12 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition
    The Presentation in the Temple: Bible Gateway passage: Luke 2:21-40 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition
    The Finding of the Child Jesus in the Temple: Bible Gateway passage: Luke 2:41-52 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition

    The Sorrowful Mysteries:
    The Agony in the Garden: Bible Gateway passage: Luke 22:39-46 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition
    The Scourging at the Pillar: Bible Gateway passage: Luke 23:13-16 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition
    The Crowning with Thorns: Bible Gateway passage: Matthew 27:26-31 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition
    Christ carries His Cross: Bible Gateway passage: Luke 23:25-32 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition
    The Crucifixion and death of Christ: Bible Gateway passage: John 19:25-30 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition

    The Glorious Mysteries:
    The Resurrection of the Lord: Bible Gateway passage: John 20:1-17 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition
    The Ascension of the Lord:Bible Gateway passage: Acts 1:2-11 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition
    The Descent of the Holy Ghost on Pentecost: Bible Gateway passage: Acts 2:1-12 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition
    The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary into Heaven: Bible Gateway passage: Revelation 12:1 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition & Bible Gateway passage: Psalm 131:8 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition
    The Coronation of Our Lady Queen of Heaven and earth: Bible Gateway passage: Revelation 12:1 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition & Bible Gateway passage: 1 Kings 2:18-20 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition & Bible Gateway passage: Esther 5:3 - Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition

    The Rosary begins with the recitation of the Apostles Creed and ends with the Hail Holy Queen and then the following prayer:

    Let us pray:
    O God, Whose only begotten Son, by His life, death and resurrection, has purchased for us the rewards of Eternal Salvation; grant we beseech Thee, that meditating upon these mysteries of the Most Holy Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary, we may imitate what they contain and obtain what they promise, through the same Christ, Our Lord.
    Amen.​

    I’m not sure whether some of these were present in the Rosary around St. Dominic’s time, or were added later; how the Rosary was said sometimes varied among certain cultures, a lot of cultures add more prayers in between the decades of the Rosary and/or at the end of the Rosary, and some also add the Act of Contrition at the beginning of the Rosary.

    A century after St. Dominic preached the Rosary, the devotion started to fall out of fashion among the Catholic populace. (which is one of the reasons why issues with the Albigensians in Occitania grew much more violent) This lack of devotion to the Rosary persisted throughout the Middle Ages until a man known as Blessed Alan de la Roche, appeared on the scene; his life, and other interesting things about the Rosary are featured in the following video below:


    In the Fatima apparitions, Our Lady added the O My Jesus or Fatima Prayer, to be said at the end of each decade of the Rosary. When St. John Paul II became Pope he made an effort to restore Marian Devotions which had fallen out of favour among Catholics in the recent past; one of the things he did was add the new Luminous Mysteries to the Rosary which I’ll discuss sometime later.
     
  2. Trophonius

    Trophonius Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't think much of it. It can come of considerate and potentially non-harmful thing to do as much as being completely inconsiderate sometimes.
     
  3. Skittlebisquit

    Skittlebisquit "..experience moments of happiness."

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    That is most delightful. I read the new oxford annotated. I thought that your ppl still used the archaic texts. I have a catholic study bible, from 1963. Its got dif books than the new oxford. Its got color plates. Guilded edges, leather cover. 20210508_163855.jpg
     
  4. Skittlebisquit

    Skittlebisquit "..experience moments of happiness."

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    So that one is from like almost 60 yrs ago? Do the modern catholic use like not the king james , archaic lang with all the thees and thou and all that
     
  5. Skittlebisquit

    Skittlebisquit "..experience moments of happiness."

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    Sorry thats not clear.
     
  6. Skittlebisquit

    Skittlebisquit "..experience moments of happiness."

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    Does the extant scripture of the Bible in Catholic service use modern English?

    Not quite

    Is the version of the Bible in use by Catholics, as thier Scripture, written in Archaic or Contemporary Language? 20210508_163915.jpg
     
  7. Greatshield17

    Greatshield17 An Appeal to Heaven! V.I.P Member

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    There does exist Catholic Bibles with non-archaic translations, the best ones being the RSV-CE and the Knox Version. The thing about Catholic translations of the Bible, is that the Church has ruled that the Latin Vulgate, translated by St. Jerome is the best Latin translation of Scripture from which, all vernacular versions of the Bible should be translated. Today however, that ruling has often been ignored and thus we have a lot Catholic Bibles that use other manuscripts; not that modern translations of the Bible like the RSV-CE, are bad, but there many advantages to the Vulgate like the fact that St. Jerome was able to use old manuscripts from the Old Testament that are now lost. The two English translations of the Bible that use the Latin Vulgate are the Douay-Rheims Bible, which I used in the links above; and the Knox Version, which is only available from Baronius Press: KNOX BIBLE - Literary and reverent translation in timeless English
     
  8. Skittlebisquit

    Skittlebisquit "..experience moments of happiness."

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    Its specifically not the king james [that catholics use] right as that one is basically... Anglican? Like church of England? The KJV is the one the fundamentalists use. The NKJV is like similar but modern parsing(?) no archaic pronouns. There is another one thats modern english that is pop with pentacostal, some of the various branches take the version of scripture as an issue of ___. I dont know how to say. They have a mission statement, which usually endorses a particular translation. In the western US the KJV is i think considered the most traditional or conservative or something. Ive not read much of the latin vulgate at all. Raised using KJV then NIV was used in pentacostal churches, the more progressive ones, that was in my teens. NIV new international version is kinda like new oxford annotated but i like new oxford much better. I think NOA is older, and NIV came to be in the 80's not sure.
     
  9. Greatshield17

    Greatshield17 An Appeal to Heaven! V.I.P Member

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    No, but the Douay-Rheims does have a lot of archaic English like the KJV. You. Can’t really read the Latin Vulgate unless you know Latin, I do have one Bible that parallels both the Douay-Rheims in English and the Vulgate in Latin, side-by-side.
     
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  10. Alexej

    Alexej Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Regarding older forms of language there is the New Jerusalem Version which is a "catholic" version. THis one uses more contemporary forms of the english language
     
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  11. Gift2humanity

    Gift2humanity Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I am non Christian and have had Christians offer to pray for me.

    I have appreciated it as, to me, praying is energetically sending a request for good energy to me, from the source, the Divine Creator.
    I'm not religious, there is a source, a Divine Creator, because there would be nothing, nothing would exist if there wasn't.

    So, yes, any Christians who want to pray to the Divine Creator for me, I am grateful for.
     
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  12. Skittlebisquit

    Skittlebisquit "..experience moments of happiness."

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    I think my catholic bible is Douay, but it says confraternity Douay.
    This is from my favorite book Ecclessiastes, for comparison. The first is ecc 2:13 from new catholic edition,1963 catholic book publishing co, ny.
    20210510_151950.jpg

    The new oxford annotated is from oxford university press, 1973, ny..
    Same chapter and verse
    20210510_152211.jpg i often look at 1 Cor ch13 for comparisons. The modern text uses"love", the catholic uses "charity", as does KJV, i think. I believe this is related to the four words for love in ancient greek
     
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  13. Greatshield17

    Greatshield17 An Appeal to Heaven! V.I.P Member

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    Interesting, I think that may be the Douay-Challoner Confraternity Bible, I’ve heard people talk about it in the past; it’s basically a Douay-Rheims Bible, with the English in it being a bit less archaic and thus, easier to understand; it’s apparently quite rare.

    I actually don’t know anything about the Oxford Bible actually.


    The difference actually comes from Latin; there are two words for love in Latin, amore and caritas, from which we get the English word “charity.” Amore, refers to a kind of emotional fondness and attraction, caritas by contrast, refers to willing the good of another, it’s an act of the will; this actually may be where we get the heart as a symbol for love, in Catholic philosophy, the human person made up of three components, the intellect, the will, and the body with its emotions, (emotions are actually considered part of the body) in the Bible, these three aspects are symbolized by the head, the heart, and the bowels respectively. Thus, love, being understood as an act of the will, is associated with the heart, the symbol for the will.