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Nope, l refuse to engage in your childhood patterns.

Atrapa Almas

70% INTJ + 30% ASPIE = 100% HUMAN
V.I.P Member
I am not the only one who understands this concept of how emotions can alter logical thinking,...so I think this is less "my personal truth" and more of a "general truth", as this is demonstrated in the psychological literature. That said, I also believe you make some valid points, which the literature also suggests,...but again,...I am trying to keep things within the context and perspective of an "argument vs discussion",...and not something else that may confuse the issue.



https://www.humintell.com/2009/08/do-emotions-affect-critical-thinking/

Yes and no.

Yes, emotions do influence thinking and yes very strong emotions can alter thinking to the point of disabling it.

No, being emotionless does not mean to improve the thinking process. In fact people with brain damage who cant process emotions cant make even easy day to day deccissions or think properly.

By sharing evidence of the "bad influence of emotions into thinking" and not sharing evidence of the "bad influence of emotionless into thinking" we are directed into thinking that emotions are bad for thinking. And that is not true.

Im not so good with articles and citations, but this two should be enougth to direct you to the sources in case you did not know about this fact:


 

Aspychata

Serenity waves, beachy vibes
V.I.P Member
Perhaps its just as @Neonatal RRT says, working out not responding with emotion derailing logic. Maybe that's the autistic part of the equation. Like l need a drug to lower the emotions. Maybe everyone fights with their emotions so it's a problem in general. The staggering number of chemical abuse in the USA probably is a clear sign of a nation of struggle.
 

Neonatal RRT

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Yes and no.

Yes, emotions do influence thinking and yes very strong emotions can alter thinking to the point of disabling it.

No, being emotionless does not mean to improve the thinking process. In fact people with brain damage who cant process emotions cant make even easy day to day deccissions or think properly.

By sharing evidence of the "bad influence of emotions into thinking" and not sharing evidence of the "bad influence of emotionless into thinking" we are directed into thinking that emotions are bad for thinking. And that is not true.

Im not so good with articles and citations, but this two should be enougth to direct you to the sources in case you did not know about this fact:


Thanks for the articles,...in fact, I read a few more on the topic. I found some of them claiming "poor decision making" as a consequence of damage to the somatic centers of the brain,...but was unable to clarify what specifically the authors of several articles were referring to. I can only speculate that "paralyzation by analyzation",...too much cognitive thinking,...versus letting impatience, frustration, anxiety, anger, and fear, (these are all variations of fear), for example, pushing the decision-making process forward when things just need to be done,...right or wrong. Obviously, the "flight-or-fight" response is fear-based,...make a decision right now,...no time to pause and think,...DO. I do think emotions play a part in decision-making,...certainly it influences one's biases and personal truths. Interesting information none-the-less.

What I am speculating, and this goes back to some of the literature, and as pointed out,...some "old ideas",...and my own experience with, as you suggest,..."very strong emotions can alter thinking to the point of disabling it",...more my point about the thread context and perspective. We were specifically talking about verbal conflicts,...arguments,...which are often charged with very strong emotions,...and how often this is destructive on many levels,...and why a more "rational" mindset may be important within this context.

Good discussion. :)

I found, perhaps a good example of what you were talking about. There is a few scenes from the Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers. Pip and Merry were emotionally trying to convince the Ents to go to war,...and frustratingly, the Ents were trying to discuss things slowly and rationally,...and then decided not to go to war. The next scene is when Treebeard walks to an open area and sees an entire forest destroyed. Treebeard becomes quite sad and angry,...and in his grief and rage,...calls the Ents to war in dramatic fashion.
 
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