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New here and newly diagnosed son

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Ani Munoz, Jun 6, 2021.

  1. Ani Munoz

    Ani Munoz New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    My 22 month old was just diagnosed with mild-moderate ASD this past week. The news came as a total shock to us since I honestly didn’t think he had it and if he did he had a very mild case...

    My son Lucas had many of the typical red flags you look for in autism kids such as:

    1. Not pointing
    2. Speech delay and poor social communication
    3. Picky eater (is not good with new textures)

    Just to name a few. He says several words and has been improving over time but not yet using words in communication as much. He is incredibly loving, likes to meet other people and has great eye contact with others too.

    I’m mostly just looking for others in my same situation which I know I’m in the right place...

    I’d love to get tips on how to help him speak more (he is on speech therapy currently) but also on how to curve his hyperactivity. He is always on the go and always babbling lol

    Looking forward to meeting you all

    - Ani
     
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  2. Wolfsage

    Wolfsage In training to be Wolf King.

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    Just to say. Sounds like your already doing the right things.
     
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  3. LadyS

    LadyS Well-Known Member

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    Welcome, welcome. I have a recently diagnosed 3 year old with very similar characteristics when he was your son's age. A bit of a speech delay (he still babbles sometimes and looking to start speech therapy soon). But he absolutely loves people and great eye contact. Agree with above, speech therapy is the best way to improve communication skills. My son also attends a preschool and being around other people has helped in picking up language as well. I also help him at home with pronunciation by breaking down words, and repeating.

    He's super hyper too (most likely will get diagnosed with ADHD when he's old enough). The only way to keep him still is to find an activity that he's really into at that moment and have that as his 'quiet playtime'. Right now for him it's playing with play dough or kinetic sand which he can do for hours. Also playing outside is pretty much the best thing as he can let off some steam and pent up energy.
     
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  4. Ani Munoz

    Ani Munoz New Member

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    Ah thank you so much for replying! It’s so nice to finally meet someone in the same circumstance as us.

    Our son is soon to start ABA therapy but I’m also looking to find other options in case ABA doesn’t work out. Did your son start some sort of therapy already and if he has, which one? if you don’t mind me asking.
     
  5. tree

    tree Blue/Green Staff Member V.I.P Member

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    [​IMG]
     
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  6. Crossbreed

    Crossbreed Neur-D Missionary ☝️

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  7. VictorR

    VictorR Random Member V.I.P Member

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    Welcome!
     
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  8. PastelPetals

    PastelPetals Well-Known Member

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    Welcome! Your parenting journey will be a bit different but there are so many places (like this one) to help guide you. He might not be speaking much but in the time he is not try to look at how he is communicating. Behaviour is communication and if he seems loving and happy most of the time just try to pay attention to the things/people he might like in the environment. I also suggest trying to see what sensory things he likes as it will most likely be very regulating. The fact that you are reaching out is amazing and shows you care I wish you luck in finding what is best for your son!
     
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  9. Magna

    Magna Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Welcome. I recommend you connect with AANE.org (Aspergers/Autism Network). They're located on the East Coast of the U.S., but they provide services via zoom and telephone across the U.S. and they're a wealth of information. They provide a free 30 min consult with an autism specialist to talk about anything autism related (and they don't try to sell you anything before, during or after the call. I know because I utilized the service). They also have free regular zoom groups for parents of autistic children.

    I'm a parent myself (as well as being autistic) and I would recommend you do thorough independent research on ABA therapy. By independent, I mean not just getting information from ABA practitioners about ABA. Just so you know, in the autistic community there is a significant number of autistic people who have very negative views on ABA up to or including considering it harmful over the long term.

    You might even want to search for past threads on this forum assuming there are some that talk about ABA.

    In my opinion one of the best things you can do for your son is ensure that your home environment is his "safe space" to be himself. He'll need a refuge from the stresses of and confusion from the world. He'll need a place to decompress and recharge, especially when he gets to school age. Let him be Lucas at home. There will be enough people in the world that will try to change him or make him into something he's not.

    Again, welcome.
     
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  10. Amy Stone

    Amy Stone Seeing the World a Bit Differently V.I.P Member

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    Welcome and congrats on the early diagnosis! But most importantly, congrats on taking the steps to getting to know how to communicate with him!
     
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  11. clg114

    clg114 Still crazy, after all these years. Staff Member V.I.P Member

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    Welcome to Autism Forums!
     
  12. ZebraAspie

    ZebraAspie Well-Known Member

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  13. Varzar

    Varzar Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Hiya Ani! Welcome to the forums!
     
  14. Greatshield17

    Greatshield17 An Appeal to Heaven! V.I.P Member

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    @Ani Munoz welcome, nice to have you on here. :) If you don’t mind me asking, when you say on your profile that you’re “official diagnosed with Autism (classic)” are you referring to yourself or your son?
     
  15. Major Tom

    Major Tom Searching for ground control... V.I.P Member

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    I also have a son on the spectrum. Sounds like you are doing the right things, but I've heard some terrible stories about how ABA is traumatic for people on the spectrum. I've never done it, so it's only hearsay.

    As far as curbing the hyperactivity, I would be interested to find something that works for my boy too. It does seem as he ages it gets slightly better (he's 8 now). I'd really like to try out medicinal cannabis on him but it's highly illegal here, so that option is out. I'm also on the spectrum and it helped me a great deal. I've since learned to live without it.

    Good luck!
     
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  16. Neonatal RRT

    Neonatal RRT Well-Known Member

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    Welcome! :)

    For frame of reference, I was not diagnosed until 52. I, fortunately, and unfortunately, have a bit of a photographic memory of my early childhood. I can remember toddling around in diapers, sitting in the high chair to eat, I can remember my first birthday party (toys, who was there, the TV shows that were on, etc.), and how I interacted with my world and with other small children, I can quote my parents (which can be quite disturbing to them). I can vividly remember all the events of the day my 7 week old brother died of SIDS, when I was 2 yrs old. It is one of the underlying motivations for me being a respiratory therapist in one of the largest neonatal centers in the world, and an educator at a local university instructing other new respiratory therapists.

    Now having said that, so-called "hyperactivity" is often misinterpreted and misdiagnosed in the autistic child, as there may be sensory issues and intellectual drive issues that result in certain behaviors. For example, is there an apparent lack of focus? Could it be environmental and internal sensory issues that make it uncomfortable to be in? Could it be that an intellectual interest is not being presented? Could it be a lack of sleep, as many of us do not produce and metabolize the hormone melatonin properly? Could it be that a limited diet also limits the microbial biome in the intestinal tract, which, in turn, could limit the amounts of certain neurotransmitters being produced or certain nutrients are lacking? Could it be that the glutamine (excitatory)-to-GABA (inhibitory) neurotransmitter ratio is unbalanced, with a bias towards glutamine? Could it be that he is having bouts of frustration with how he communicates vs. how others around him communicate? This a small list of questions to consider when dealing with so-called "behavior issues" in the autistic,...even into adulthood. It is important to understand that autism is a congenital condition, it has its own anatomy, physiology, and psychology. Trained neurologists can readily identify an autistic brain on MRI studies, and functional MRI studies are an important area for autism research. Basically, the autistic brain has physical characteristics that lead to different function. Another way to put it, is that the "hardware" is different, so, in some cases, no amount of "software" is going to change it. All we can do is manage symptoms and in some cases, learn how to mask our behavior in order to appear somewhat "normal".

    Personally, I have always had 5 distinct frequencies of ringing in my head, tinnitus, that has nothing to do with the functioning of my ears. The frequencies bounce and sing in my head, non-stop, even while sleeping. I have to have some sort of "white noise" in my environment all the time or else it can be quite distracting. Researchers believe it is a form of thalamo-cortico dysrhythmia due to how the neurons formed and migrated,...it is part of my autism. As a child, it played a part in my level of activity, basically trying to get away from it, and I couldn't stand to be in a quiet room to sleep,...which was also a challenge. I have what is known as "Visual Snow Syndrome",...a pixelated view of the world, and it has nothing to do with my eyes, but rather, it too, is a form of thalamo-cortico dysrhythmia due to my autism. I am photo sensitive. I don't sense pain like others and can, and have, injured myself,...as a child, it presented as unusually high physical strength and a high tolerance for pain. What it meant as child was not feeling pain when I was cut, bruised,...or spanked (that was a frequent thing in my house). I set 11 national records when I competed in weightlifting. What it meant for me was multiple torn muscles, ligaments, bone fractures,...surgeries,...and now,...severe arthritis now that I am older. Some things I do not smell,...skunk, for one,...which was quite disturbing to my wife when the dogs got sprayed and I just let them in the house like nothing happened.:D I also cannot pass a mandatory mask fitting at work because the smelly sprays they use to test a sealed mask,...I can't smell or taste. I am lacking in cognitive empathy, but quite high in emotional empathy. In other words, I wear my emotions on my sleeve and respond to others emotional state, if someone else is crying, I will cry with them,...but I do not have the ability to understand or predict what it could be like in another's shoes. Don't get angry with me about considering someone else's feelings,..."How do you think that makes me feel?",...is not a question I could answer. "How would you feel if I did that to you?"...is not a question I could answer. "How are you feeling right now?"...is not a question I could answer. How can I be married for 35 years to the same woman,...and have zero clue as to her thoughts? I never have. It is a mystery to me every time I interact with her. At some level I can say I know her from experience, but I can't look at her and have any idea what she is thinking,...I always have to ask. I don't pick up on hints or clues. I could go on and on here.

    Every autistic is different in how they perceive and interact with their world. As a parent, you must understand that in many ways we feel like a visiting extraterrestrial alien trapped here on Earth. Our sensory experience, our social experience, our communication experience, our intellectual experience, our emotional experience, can be quite altered from the so-called "norm". I once told my department manager, "If I could transfer to you my sensory experience,...you would probably call an ambulance." We are judged by others, by neurotypical norms,...and that just sets many of us up for failure on so many levels. Having said all of that,...I would be very careful interpreting and receiving diagnosis from professionals that do not fully understand autism,...as they may be diagnosing based upon neurotypical norms, not autistic norms. ;):)
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2021 at 3:13 PM
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  17. clg114

    clg114 Still crazy, after all these years. Staff Member V.I.P Member

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    Welcome to Autism Forums!
     
  18. OkRad

    OkRad μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος οὐλομένην V.I.P Member

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  19. Greatshield17

    Greatshield17 An Appeal to Heaven! V.I.P Member

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    Life as an Aspie is hard, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.
     
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  20. SusanLR

    SusanLR Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Welcome to the forums! :)