• Welcome to Autism Forums, a friendly forum to discuss Aspergers Syndrome, Autism, High Functioning Autism and related conditions.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Private Member only forums for more serious discussions that you may wish to not have guests or search engines access to.
    • Your very own blog. Write about anything you like on your own individual blog.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon! Please also check us out @ https://www.twitter.com/aspiescentral

Greatshield17

An Appeal to Heaven!
V.I.P Member
Okay I’m finally going to discuss this thing I’ve been meaning to discuss on here, it’s about moving to a different country. Awhile ago, I talked to my dad about wanting to be a homesteader, and he mentioned that my family, still owns farmland down in Chile. At first both me and my dad felt that it would be better if were able to farm here, but the more I have thought about it, the more I’m wondering if maybe, it’s better if I claimed that land; there is of the practical reason that, here I’m having trouble finding employment and I’ll have to work hard and save up lots of money before I could buy farmland, all white living in an economy that’s very dysfunctional. But, I also feel a personal longing and almost, a responsibility to claim that land, as a member of the family; I’d feel better if that land stayed in our possession, rather than fall into the hands of some rich guy who would, turn it into a casino or something. The farm is in a town called Rere, in Chile’s Bíobío Region it’s currently being owned and operated by my aunt, I think.

So, I’m seriously going down there and claiming that farmland, and I want to know what all that entails, what is entailed in moving to a place like Chile? What am I allowed to take in regards to seeds and the like what is the process of immigration like if I were to become a full time citizen?
 

Suzette

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
In most countries you will not be allowed to bring seeds in, though as a farmer you might be permitted depending on local law. You will have to ask your aunt but Chile might operate as many things do here in Mexico, that is gratuities grease the wheels.
How to Move to Chile: the Complete Relocation Guide | InterNations

Since you want to operate a farm it would be best to consult with a Chilean lawyer to get details on how to go about it. Most countries take financial operations very seriously and there is usually some official documents that must be completed.
 

Gerontius

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
This is one of those things that's worth a trip to Chile first to go visit--not just something that a bunch of el gringos on the Internet can tell you about. (Sure we have people from all over the world, but there sure are a lot of Americans on this website.) Go see your family's bit of land, go see whatever else, go get a regular exploration done.

Seeds should be available locally. Get good at learning Chile's culture, agriculture styles, etc. Hang out with your aunt. See if the place is decent enough to live. Sounds like a regular trip and this might actually be the best idea I've seen from you in awhile--pretty neat. (Best idea because it offers you the ability to fulfill a ton of things you've wanted, all at once.)

For a bit extra income sign up for Spectroomz and see if you can land some mobile jobs, working online, and see if that helps. Then you'll have a chance at making all this work out.

I didn't expect you to take off and be a cornfield conquistador but hey it is a lot better idea than sitting around in the US/Canada area, if things aren't working out here. I've noticed a lot of people from other countries have zero problem with autistic folks, too. "Autism acceptance?" Well the Kenyans are trying to talk me into going to Africa.

Adventure and exploration are part of human nature; sounds like a plan. Look into this.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Yet another source of information:

https://www.expat.cl/guide-chile/living-chile/things-to-know-before-moving-to-chile/

Personally I wouldn't consider relocating to much of any country until the pandemic is fully resolved on a global level. Knowing that some countries like Vietnam forced nearly all foreigners working or tourists to leave the country given pandemic concerns. Seemed rather xenophobic, but they did it for real.

Sad, as I enjoyed the YouTube presentations of Chris Lewis, a young American living and working in Hanoi. He speaks fluent Vietnamese and constantly amazed the locals. I know he'll be back there when the pandemic finally ends. A great way to look in on the lives of an ex-patriot living well in a very different society.
 
Last edited:

Greatshield17

An Appeal to Heaven!
V.I.P Member
This is one of those things that's worth a trip to Chile first to go visit--not just something that a bunch of el gringos on the Internet can tell you about. (Sure we have people from all over the world, but there sure are a lot of Americans on this website.) Go see your family's bit of land, go see whatever else, go get a regular exploration done.

Seeds should be available locally. Get good at learning Chile's culture, agriculture styles, etc. Hang out with your aunt. See if the place is decent enough to live. Sounds like a regular trip and this might actually be the best idea I've seen from you in awhile--pretty neat. (Best idea because it offers you the ability to fulfill a ton of things you've wanted, all at once.)

For a bit extra income sign up for Spectroomz and see if you can land some mobile jobs, working online, and see if that helps. Then you'll have a chance at making all this work out.

I didn't expect you to take off and be a cornfield conquistador but hey it is a lot better idea than sitting around in the US/Canada area, if things aren't working out here. I've noticed a lot of people from other countries have zero problem with autistic folks, too. "Autism acceptance?" Well the Kenyans are trying to talk me into going to Africa.

Adventure and exploration are part of human nature; sounds like a plan. Look into this.
Thanks, I'll certainly keep this in mind.
 

Streetwise

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
The only news i saw was General Pinochets wife had died didnt seem to be very much about the pandemic
 

New Threads

Top Bottom