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Missing The Sixties

The sixties reminded me of my grand mother talking about the roaring 1920's in Dutch years ago flappers, music.
Some eras are just special or just inflection points.
 
The sixties was not a pleasant time for me. 1964-1969 represented elementary school, which is where I experienced most of my being bullied and ridiculed. The 70s were much nicer. By then, I had learned to disregard other kids' opinions of me, and to keep to myself whenever possible.
Same here. I achieved a level of autonomy in the 70s which hadn't been possible in my early childhood.
 
Yeah, I was there. A distinctly non social guy, music was my touchstone. Great memories in some of the above links.

To me, that period was about the Sexual Revolution. Some girls were clearly not wearing bras, and rumors turned out true that many were taking contraceptive drugs so that they could, well, you know. I knew people whose understanding of the purpose of life was ‘sex and drugs and rock n’ roll’.

But guys were being ripped from tending their pot crops to go die in a jungle, few coming home were the people we waved goodbye to. The government shot and even killed students at Jackson and Kent State. Steve Miller sang the Jackson-Kent Blues and CS&N asked; how can you run when you know?

And yet, just last night, my son and his wife treated me to a nostalgic trip through some old Roger Miller favorites of the period; fun, mellow, humorous. Made me want to jump in a Tijuana Taxi and just drive on.
 
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Take the '60s, subtract the war on drugs, the Cold War with all its permutations, and the various kinds of bigotry that were common, and America would have been a utopia. If these things did not impact you, then for you, it really was a utopia. The decade had many, many good things going for it. Unfortunately, the age of Aquarius didn't materialize


First year in college, my drama class performed "Hair" on stage - including the nude scene - and I got to sing this as a part of the chorus. It was "theater in the round." We were surrounded by a huge translucent curtain that was slowly lowered to reveal everything. I made sure my parents never knew... 😉
 
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Yeah, I was there. A distinctly non social guy, music was my touchstone. Great memories in some of the above links.

To me, that period was about the Sexual Revolution. Some girls were clearly not wearing bras, and rumors turned out true that many were taking contraceptive drugs so that they could, well, you know. I knew people whose understanding of the purpose of life was ‘sex and drugs and rock n’ roll’.

But guys were being ripped from tending their pot crops to go die in a jungle, few coming home were the people we waved goodbye to. The government shot and even killed students at Jackson and Kent State. Steve Miller sang the Jackson-Kent Blues and CS&N asked; how can you run when you know?

And yet, just last night, my son and his wife treated me to a nostalgic trip through some old Roger Miller favorites of the period; fun, mellow, humorous. Made me want to jump in a Tijuana Taxi and just drive on.
Tin soldiers and Nixon's comin'...

I remember those days well - remember all the way back to the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Beatles invasion.

I fit in well with the hippie crowd. Unfortunately, there were no hippies in my school. It would not have been tolerated. I was dragged down to the principal's office and hit in the back of my head just for being a part of a "conspiracy" to start a student newspaper. We didn't have one in jr. high and thought we'd get creative. The only time anyone had ever asked for my help in anything. 😢

At least I got to listen to the music. It might have been worth all the pain.

 
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For the longest time, I thought "The Seekers" were Brits! :oops:
That happens with a lot of Aussie artists, some even advance their careers by letting everyone think they're British or American. Judith Durham was born in Australia but a surprisingly large number of our best musicians were born in the UK and migrated here as children. Just like @Ronald Zeeman mentioned with the Bee Gees, the Brothers Gibb, born on the Isle of Mann but grew up in Australia.
 
That happens with a lot of Aussie artists, some even advance their careers by letting everyone think they're British or American. Judith Durham was born in Australia but a surprisingly large number of our best musicians were born in the UK and migrated here as children. Just like @Ronald Zeeman mentioned with the Bee Gees, the Brothers Gibb, born on the Isle of Mann but grew up in Australia.
LOL....didn't realize the BeeGees were born in Britain!

But then there was a time when I thought Mel Gibson was a young Aussie....go figure.

I do know that Patrick McGoohan was born in New York City...lol.
 
But then there was a time when I thought Mel Gibson was a young Aussie....go figure.
He identified himself as Australian, it's where he spent most of his younger life. That's the case with many of us, you don't have to be born here to be an Aussie, it's more a way of life. :)

James Doohan - Scotty from Star Trek, fooled quite a few people in to thinking he was actually Scottish too. Canadian.
 
He identified himself as Australian, it's where he spent most of his younger life. That's the case with many of us, you don't have to be born here to be an Aussie, it's more a way of life. :)

James Doohan - Scotty from Star Trek, fooled quite a few people in to thinking he was actually Scottish too. Canadian.
Yeah, I saw way too many of his character actor roles to know Jimmy Doohan was Canadian long before Star Trek. Not to mention the fellow Canadians who shot off some of his fingers on D-Day.

Funny that his son continues the role of Montgomery Scott, and he does a Scotsman just as well. Even if he is Canadian...

 
Funny that his son continues the role of Montgomery Scott, and he does a Scotsman just as well.
As the surname Doohan implies, they do have Scottish relatives. The character name Montgomery Scott is actually James Doohan's grandfather's name.
 
As the surname Doohan implies, they do have Scottish relatives. The character name Montgomery Scott is actually James Doohan's grandfather's name.

I remember Doohan in shows like "The Outer Limits" and "The Fugitive".


The Fugitive always cracks me up recalling a very dour cop played by Barry Morse. Never gave him much thought until I saw him in "Space 1999" and thought his English accent was a bit over the top. LOL.....wasn't until years later I discovered he was a Brit. Played a brilliant American though. Great actor.

Reminds me of seeing Shatner and Nimoy in the same episode of "Man From Uncle" too. With Colonel Klink as well...lol. Nimoy should have put "the squeeze" on Klink:

 
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Tin soldiers and Nixon's comin'...

I remember those days well - remember all the way back to the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Beatles invasion.

I fit in well with the hippie crowd. Unfortunately, there were no hippies in my school. It would not have been tolerated. I was dragged down to the principal's office and hit in the back of my head just for being a part of a "conspiracy" to start a student newspaper. We didn't have one in jr. high and thought we'd get creative. The only time anyone had ever asked for my help in anything. 😢

At least I got to listen to the music. It might have been worth all the pain.

Kansas City Star really takes me back to huge grocery store parking lots where you could ride clunky mechanical rides and maybe see your favorite local kiddie show hero. I twice saw the Oscar Meyer Weinermobile, touched it, once saw Sheriff John. But it was at Knott’s Berry Farm that I stood right in front of Big Frank in a gift shop; he was like 7’12” tall, and you knew him from the commercials. Hot dogs were blossoming into a huge industry, I guess. Living equidistant between Knott’s and Disneyland, we attracted a lot of these Superstars.

Guess I never grew up. Decades later, I walked the flight line at Pt. Mugu’s Pacific Missile Test Center, physically touched the fuselages of three of the visiting Blue Angels before being chased off. (While never personally confronted, a Command memo was circulated around the base that, if you weren’t flight line staff, you didn’t belong on the flight line. Who knew?) Yup; I’ve touched the Blue Angels AND the Oscar Meyer Weinermobile. It was a golden era.

But I never tried anything as subversive as a student newspaper.
 
REMINDER



See Post #1.

Further replies to this thread need to adhere to the guideline, which is
that political discussion is to be autism related.


"Politics is the way that people living in groups make planned decisions. Politics is about making agreements between people so that they can live together in groups such as tribes, cities, or countries."

"In everyday life, the term "politics" refers to the way that countries are governed, and to the ways that governments make rules and laws to manage the human society properly."

Laws can be defined as agreements between people.
Legislation/laws is a governmental type function.
"A government is the system or group of people governing an organized community..."
 
1963, l was tiny. My mom was driving a Studebaker. The car radio broadcast that someone had died. She was crying. It was JFK.
 
If you remember the sixties, you weren't there.

Since I was a small tyke then, I didn't have much of a grasp of what was going on.
On my AM radio I heard about gorillas in Ethiopia attacking small towns. MUCH later realized it was guerillas.
And in my family, my much older sister and brother arguing with Mom and Dad over the Vietnam War.
My sister giving me her "pie" album- actually The Who's Tommy album (reminded me of a cherry pie crust).
Riding my single-speed bicycle to elementary school, and zooming on the trails at the creek.
At 10, puberty and an associated decline in health that still dogs me.
 
I was born nearly two decades after the 60s, but for a long time I have been in love with 60s music (along with 70s music, and now some 50s). A big factor for my love of music is instrumentation, and I feel like the 60s (and 70s, 50s) did it right, for me. I don't much care for flashy synths, drum machines, autotune. I like woodwinds, brass, orchestral strings, harpsichord, hammond organ in addition to the standard guitar, drums, bass setup.

I'm not one to put on rose-tinted glasses, though. I'd rather have been born when I was for many reasons. I have access to a much larger amount of music from the era than my parents did back then, anyway, thanks to the wonders of the internet!
 
I was born in 1964 and have vague memories of the moon landing. Anything before that is pretty much a blank.
 
I was born in 1964 and have vague memories of the moon landing.
I'm a 65 model. I don't remember the actual days of the moon landing, but when I started Grade 1 in 1970 they showed us a video of it and that started my fascination with technology and with science fiction.

Prior to 1970 we lived in Berri which was a pretty remote little town back then, we rarely got to watch TV because reception was so bad, and that was with a 60 foot aerial tower in the back yard. I used to get yelled at a lot for climbing the tower.
 

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