• Welcome to Autism Forums, a friendly forum to discuss Aspergers Syndrome, Autism, High Functioning Autism and related conditions.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Private Member only forums for more serious discussions that you may wish to not have guests or search engines access to.
    • Your very own blog. Write about anything you like on your own individual blog.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon! Please also check us out @ https://www.twitter.com/aspiescentral

Just To Start Things Off (calling all girls)

Pieceofmind

Active Member
From what I've seen and read it is often less physically pronounced because of how the male and female brain tend to be wired neurologically and a lot more goes on internally with females, even my girlfriend says the same thing but there will always be a lot of exceptions. Because of this I think many females just tend to get diagnosed later and it provides the perception on the surface that there are far less of them out there. I can't think of why there would be less. No one is the same and there's always going to be a lot of variation too.
 

smilie

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
hello everyone
i think it was a good idea willow and females are different to males on the spectrum
and females tend to hide it well more than males thats why i think its not only hard for females but for also males on the spectrum
 

Running Girl

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I think there may be a need for a females only forum just cause we present differently and are so often misdiagnosed, even by our selves! A psychiatrist proposed I was aspergers a good 10 years before I accepted that I even might be ( which actually made me correctly diagnosed but the different look that female asd have threw me off) .
So I'm in a misunderstood misdiagnosed minority WITHIN a misunderstood misdiagnosed minority! Yeah, I know, "poor me". But for those women who arent sure about the diagnosis, could be very helpful.
 

watersprite

inadvertent vagabond
V.I.P Member
I was diagnosed quite a while ago.
Always knew I wss different, but my family of origin just kept trying to make me conform, & telling me I was, “a failure at everything.” That wasn’t helpful.

I learned to hide and mask as much of myself as possible. Being creative and sort of intelligent and notoriously err, feisty, I managed to get through university and into loads of trouble over the years. Among other things being a single mama to 2 children who’re now grown up, wonderful people.
 

watersprite

inadvertent vagabond
V.I.P Member
This (pic below) is just one of the situations which was utterly untenable to me as child. The pic isn’t of my school, it’s just an example. Crowds, close contact, overly bright, over-bearing authority figures, and the girls have to wear dresses.
o_O :fearful::tongueclosed::triumph::confused::eek:

12BBE221-615E-4B27-B052-8E6FAD621964.jpeg

credit to abc news au
 
Last edited:

kingscross

New Member
I was diagnosed with autism spectrum at 25. The psychologist who did my evaluation recommended I find a support group for women on the spectrum. So far I've had zero luck finding one in person.
 

Suzanne

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
When I first read about aspergers, it was actually a female and because it resonated with me, things described, it got me exploring more and was so suprised to find that rarely are females diagnosed. The "mental health" department actually believe it to be just males.

We can mask. Males find it hard to mask.

Many say that on first meeting me, they do not detect any difference with me. But, the more relaxed I feel in that person's company, they say that they notice traits coming out. I guess it is because I do clap my hands in glee and act particularly like an excited child, rather than an adult.

I am a girly girl, with a twist lol
 

Suzanne

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I was diagnosed with autism spectrum at 25. The psychologist who did my evaluation recommended I find a support group for women on the spectrum. So far I've had zero luck finding one in person.

I was told, after diagnosis: I wish you the best: it is going to be hard for you and since then, no support.
 

Suzanne

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I like that there's a girls forum. :) My mom didn't believe me for the longest time when I told her I thought I had ASP because I was so good at mimicking people. I was doubting myself too... until I found out that this is typical for ASP girls... not so much for ASP guys though...

So! Summing it up... It's nice to be able to talk to girls that I can relate to. :) Woot for ASP girls! :p
Me too, good at mimicking people and my husband recently said I should be careful, because it could come across as though I am mocking someone! The thing is, it is so natural to do, when I like a character.
 

Owliet

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Me too, good at mimicking people and my husband recently said I should be careful, because it could come across as though I am mocking someone! The thing is, it is so natural to do, when I like a character.
Agreed. I’ve also had this pointed out to me too and warned to be careful because I may be offending someone if I copy them outright. But it’s really useful to be able to observe how someone acts and try to adapt it in similar situation.
 

EvaL

New Member
Yo!

I'm really glad there's a section for girls here because I actually don't know a single other girl with Aspergers and it does make me feel a tad lonely and isolated sometimes :/

Hmm, I don't really know what else to say... :D
I feel the same as , we seem to be very rare ... I find it almost impossible to keep friendships with girls who aren't on the spectrum.. it would be nicer if there were some more girls around who understood us more . . It is very isolating feeling lonely
 

Suzanne

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Agreed. I’ve also had this pointed out to me too and warned to be careful because I may be offending someone if I copy them outright. But it’s really useful to be able to observe how someone acts and try to adapt it in similar situation.
I guess this shouldn't be a surprise, since we are mostly all on the spectrum, but yep, I like to observe as well, so that I can learn social behaviour and it is a real big annoyance to me, when I can't and thus, feel that I am blind to what goes on with "normal" people.

I tend to mimic ones I really like.
 

Owliet

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I feel the same as , we seem to be very rare ... I find it almost impossible to keep friendships with girls who aren't on the spectrum.. it would be nicer if there were some more girls around who understood us more . . It is very isolating feeling lonely
There seems to be a preoccupation that ASD is still only affects men and so any woman who may be on the spectrum is not obvious and can often miss out on diagnosis. I was diagnosed as a teenager and only met guys in the special support group. It was very isolating, and it Wasn’t until I went to uni that this changed. I met 3! Feeling understood, no longer as alone or the only one is so important. it was nice!
 

New Threads

Top Bottom