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Fledglings

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Raggamuffin, Jun 1, 2021.

  1. Raggamuffin

    Raggamuffin Well-Known Member

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    Today, as I went to lunch I noticed 2 seagulls with 2 fledglings. It made me feel anxious as I had to take a fledgling that fell off the roof to a local vet.

    I'd hoped there wouldn't be any on the roof this year. I'm concerned this will play on my mind a lot. Admittedly, there's nothing I can do about it, other than hope that over the next few months they grow up and eventually take flight in late summer.

    This will be our last year at this building. A perfect send off would be to see these 2 fledglings grow up and survive their most vulnerable moments.

    It'll be several months before they attempt to fly. That's a long time to wait, and the possibility for anxious rumination is high. But it's just another example of fretting over a situation that I have no means of affecting.

    Seeing newly born birds should fill me with hope and happiness - not anxiety and terror.

    Since last year I look out the window a lot less. Although, the behaviour from several gulls last week had me thinking they were going to be nesting on the roof again.

    Hopefully all goes well.

    Ed
     
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  2. unperson

    unperson Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Put yourself first, not them.
     
  3. GadAbout

    GadAbout Well-Known Member

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    I like birds, too. At the farm supply store I looked at stock-tanks full of new hatchling chickens (under heat lamps). It would have been so fun to raise some! But I don't think I could take them in for slaughter. I used to keep zebra finches, but since my husband was allergic to birds, I had to give them up. So I content myself watching the birds who nest on or around our building.

    I may have missed the point of your thread. But I enjoyed talking about birds, all the same.
     
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  4. OkRad

    OkRad μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος οὐλομένην V.I.P Member

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    Relocating animals can be disastrous. It is best to let nature take its course. Relocation can place an animal into unfamiliar groups and science is showing it can be terrorizing.

    What you are describing is not relocation per se, but the recovered bird, if it is not accepted back into its group, will not know what to do. Once it flies away, the humans think, "Yay!" and have warm fuzzies and dopmaine surges, but the bird is in terror and cannot find their group (they need their group to survive) or food sources.

    It's especially bad for relocated squirrels who cannot find their food stash and will starve. All this to say, you really cannot worry about the situation because there is no really good solution.

    Even one specifically trained in rehabilitation of wildlife will stress the importance of return to the original family, but they may not accept the recovered animal and may not be found. It's a risk.

    A fallen bird has little chance and I say that as a bird lover.

    Here is just one link, but you can research. Rehabilitating wildlife is no easy task.

    Scrap the trap when evicting wildlife
     
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  5. ForestGumpett

    ForestGumpett Well-Known Member

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    What I’ve done that has worked is just to move the bird to a protected place like out of a parking lot and into the edge of a bush where the mother can get to it. From what I’ve seen, the mother will continue to feed it and most of the time it will learn to fly.

    Anytime I’ve taken the birds to help they have died.

    I love birds but do not put out a feeder for two reasons, one it usually becomes a feeder for the hawlks that eat smaller birds (bad and sad) and the big one, Lyme Disease. Birds carry ticks, most are full of them. Lyme Disease will kill you, and if not it will make you wish you were dead. BTDT.
     
  6. Yeshuasdaughter

    Yeshuasdaughter Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Then don't slaughter them. Have fresh eggs, and sell them too!
     
  7. GadAbout

    GadAbout Well-Known Member

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    Can't, deed restrictions and city laws, etc. I wish I could still live in the country, but I'm an old lady and need to live a simplified lifestyle.
     
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  8. Varzar

    Varzar Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I came here hoping for pictures of fledglings. :D
     
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