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Dementia as an alternative "neurotype"

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by GadAbout, Dec 4, 2019.

  1. Streetwise

    Streetwise Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I agree wholeheartedly if you seen somebody with Lou Gehrig’s disease you are in no doubt that is a neurotype my mother spent the first four or five months after diagnosis refusing to communicate with anyone I presume because she feared that she would be looked at negatively it was bad enough that she lost her speech and she was watching her muscles die without somebody inferring that she didn’t belong to a group because she wasn’t autistic schizophrenic or had bipolar disorder or the disorders grouped under autism.
    imagine being paralysed and being one of the most !!independent people you could possibly imagine and somebody who you almost detest !!!!who has come to care for you ,even though nobody !wanted !you to indicating !!!!that you were lazy! because you couldn’t get up from a wheelchair and then somebody saying you’re not a neurotype ,imagine what she would be thinking !,try to imagine every single muscle and nerve in your body dying ,I mean every single one !for instance her lips collapsed !inwards !because the muscles died in her lips ,her eyelids started to collapse because the muscles died ,neck collapsed because the muscles died ,hands and fingers curled inwards because the muscles died ,legs twisted inwards for some reason, she weighed 3 1/2 stones when she died ,then you have Alzheimer’s disease where not only do you lose your memory! but you forget how to eat !and drink !so you starve to death !which means your heart !shrinks! all your organs shrink !that would be agony, make all those people’s lives one jot harder by saying they don’t belong.
     
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  2. nowwhat

    nowwhat Well-Known Member

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    No need for sematic sleight of hand or nonsensical and confusion redefinition of already useful, settled and agreed upon language. Why not go with regular old love, patience and inderstanding? Isnt that what we are talking about here?
     
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  3. Bolletje

    Bolletje Overly complicated potato V.I.P Member

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    I’ve worked on a ward with people with non-congenital brain damage. This included people who had been in accidents, people with Korsakoff and Huntington’s, to mention a few. While I wouldn’t call them neurotypical, I wouldn’t call it a different type of neurodiversity. I see it more as an altered state because of permanent damage to the brain. I’d classify the several types of dementia in the same group, although the mechanisms are vastly different.
     
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  4. Autistamatic

    Autistamatic He's just this guy, you know? V.I.P Member

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    There are no "types" of Neurodiversity. It is a singular concept applied to the entire population.
     
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  5. GadAbout

    GadAbout Well-Known Member

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    I didn't think this question would be so controversial. Personally, I will continue to hold my concept of dementia as an instance of neurodiversity because it is fruitful, even if it isn't theoretically sound. It reminds me that my husband's state is different but valid and valued. I have to catch myself over and over, starting to view him as annoyingly stupid and remembering instead that he makes the most of what he has.

    Not to start any further controversy, but I also view psychiatric illnesses the same way - OCD, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, etc. I view them that way because it informs my response to people with these problems. I even think you can fruitfully extend the principle to people in an altered state due to drugs.

    I never meant to suggest that autism is a disease.
     
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  6. Fino

    Fino Alex V.I.P Member

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    So you find it easier to be compassionate within a particular paradigm. If you can convince yourself to view all people in this way, you'll be a saint!
     
  7. GadAbout

    GadAbout Well-Known Member

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    I can't view my narcissistic sister in this way, because I was victimized by her way too much and too often. Sorry! No saint here.
     
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  8. AuBurney Tuckerson

    AuBurney Tuckerson ~GigglesTheAutisticHyena~

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    You're victimized by your sister??? Reminds me of Frostee's situation.
     
  9. GadAbout

    GadAbout Well-Known Member

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    Nothing of the sort, but I'm not going to bore everyone with the details.
     
  10. AuBurney Tuckerson

    AuBurney Tuckerson ~GigglesTheAutisticHyena~

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    Ok