• Welcome to Autism Forums, a friendly forum to discuss Aspergers Syndrome, Autism, High Functioning Autism and related conditions.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Private Member only forums for more serious discussions that you may wish to not have guests or search engines access to.
    • Your very own blog. Write about anything you like on your own individual blog.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon! Please also check us out @ https://www.twitter.com/aspiescentral

Singing issues

D'Andre

Well-Known Member
I have been singing my whole life. I record, write, sort of play....but I'm have an issue with my upper register. My question as a newly discovered person on the spectrum...can shutdowns and exposure to overly stimulating situations affect "vocal coordination"
A year ago, I experienced what I now believe was a shutdown to the point I couldn't move or speak. It was in public and a million things were suggested like a small stroke. A few days ago, it happened again and I have been sick on top of it. I'm well now, but my upper register feels uncoordinated, not painful, not strained, my vocal approach feels ineffective. The note is in my head but my body won't make the sound. My wonder if it's:
Swollen chords or larynx
Affect from shutdown
Medicine and low energy etc..
I'm considering seeing an ear, nose, mhroat Dr.
Anybody else relate? It's like I can't even scream
 
For me personally, overstimulation will affect speech and singing. Some days I can sing pretty well with little effort. Other days, it's a struggle to sing the same songs, because I'm just too weak and burned out. It's very frustrating, because singing relaxes me.
 
For me personally, overstimulation will affect speech and singing. Some days I can sing pretty well with little effort. Other days, it's a struggle to sing the same songs, because I'm just too weak and burned out. It's very frustrating, because singing relaxes me.
Yes. See I was wondering if there could be a connection.
 
It sounds like it would be a good idea to check out the medical side of things just in case, but it also makes sense what you described about a meltdown. This doesn’t happen to me, but I was just speaking with a friend with autism who does have the muscles related to speaking seize up in moments of anxiety. It is painful to push through it if they do. The feeling goes away when there is no pressure to speak and they are in a more relaxed situation.
 
Yes because singing uses muscles and muscle memory. If you feel off, you are likely to sound off. Everyone has different sinus cavities and mouth shapes, too, but more importantly, you could be having a bit of sinus stuffies going on that you don't even realize until you just can't hit notes you are used to hitting. This happens to me a lot. I live in an area notorious for bad sinuses in folks. That echinacea tea with honey or just hot coffee and water are my best friends besides those ricola drops. I absolutely have these kinds of days. Maybe even a month out of every year if I combined the amount of days together, I have this kind of goings on. You are not alone!
 
My singing voice is very soft. If I'm feeling nervous, it kind of goes flat, and it's hard to sing different notes. I do love singing though.
 
For me personally, overstimulation will affect speech and singing. Some days I can sing pretty well with little effort. Other days, it's a struggle to sing the same songs, because I'm just too weak and burned out. It's very frustrating, because singing relaxes me.
Same ^^ It also feels a little weirder because I have a much deeper voice but can still sing very high. I can do a lot of impressions and it might get better with age?
 
It sounds like it would be a good idea to check out the medical side of things just in case, but it also makes sense what you described about a meltdown. This doesn’t happen to me, but I was just speaking with a friend with autism who does have the muscles related to speaking seize up in moments of anxiety. It is painful to push through it if they do. The feeling goes away when there is no pressure to speak and they are in a more relaxed situation.
Agreed ^^ The closest thing I had to that was singing 80s songs I barely knew in front of an older audience , : D I think they liked it despite that though, they thought I was cute
 
As I have aged I found my voice to be losing its range and also not hitting the pitch.

I’m taking voice lessons now and my range and pitch control have much improved.

If it’s not a medical issue, you might want to try some voice lessons.
 
Same ^^ It also feels a little weirder because I have a much deeper voice but can still sing very high. I can do a lot of impressions and it might get better with age?
That's cool. In voice training, they say impressions are a great way to build your voice. And it sounds like you naturally wing with a lowered larynx witch allows depth and warmth even when you sing high nots. Classically trained singers usually lower their larynx
 
As I have aged I found my voice to be losing its range and also not hitting the pitch.

I’m taking voice lessons now and my range and pitch control have much improved.

If it’s not a medical issue, you might want to try some voice lessons.
I'm a brand new certified voice teacher. That's why I'm concerned. I believe its medical because I've always taken care of my voice. But I'm definitely making use of pitch and range exercises so thanks for that.
 
That's cool. In voice training, they say impressions are a great way to build your voice. And it sounds like you naturally wing with a lowered larynx witch allows depth and warmth even when you sing high nots. Classically trained singers usually lower their larynx
Woah that's interesting! I didn't know that before... I did notice that many good singers have a wide range and can do low and high, like Ashleigh Ball and Andrea Libman for example, two of my biggest inspirations.
 
I looked to Ashleigh Ball. Her larynx is actually raised. She's amazing. An example I'd use for a pop singer with low larynx (mostly) is Lara Fabian. And my all time favorite in her younger years, Mariah Carey. Listen to vanishing and her mouth placement is is worded with a lot of "ahh" usually resulting in low larynx and bigger sound.
 
Top Bottom