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Post something Weird or Random

Nitro

Admin/Immoral Turpitude
Staff member
Admin
V.I.P Member
The original standard for the inch was alleged to have been three of the King's finest barley corns laid end to end.

"The dimension of the print calls out 47/64ths of three barley corns laid end to end plus or minus a half a barley corn" :p

Basically by using the decimal system for our machinework mensuration, we have eliminated the crude use of fractions in favor of a base ten system.
 

WhitewaterWoman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I love Australians’ attitude. Mum’s not worried about her daughter; she just in the bottom of an 8 meter deep well. :)

Back to units of measure; in the US we sell eggs and donuts by the dozen. When I asked for a dozen donut holes in Canada the bemused clerk told me they were only sold 10 to a box.

There is also a “baker’s dozen” which is 13.

We also sell hot dogs in packets of 10, but hot dog buns are sold in packets of 8.
 
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Forest Cat

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I have heard that ounces per cubic inch is a superior freedom unit. And that bald eagles per McDonalds is better than kilometers per hour. ;)


1669074831029.png
 

Metal316

Active Member
The original standard for the inch was alleged to have been three of the King's finest barley corns laid end to end.

"The dimension of the print calls out 47/64ths of three barley corns laid end to end plus or minus a half a barley corn" :p

Basically by using the decimal system for our machinework mensuration, we have eliminated the crude use of fractions in favor of a base ten system.
I thought it was the top of the thumb, maybe that goes back to old Egyptian times. No doubt you know much better.

There was some good about Britain although I don't think you'd concede. The EU, back when it was the EEC copied our British Standards, just changed the name.

You're very aggressive in your posts, you needn't worry.
There's not really a "British " for you to hate.

The union is going down the swanny so is the Commonwealth so it seems on the news lately.
I'm English btw.
 

VictorR

Random Member
V.I.P Member
I had to look up outdated's two penny coin. We only had a "two pence" coin in decimal, ie., after 1971.
Maybe we had them before I was born.

In the pre-decimal world, the 1797 copper coins - the monsterous 1d and 2d weighing 1 oz and 2 oz respectively, was the only time that the 2d made an appearance, aside from maundy money.

cartwheel-penny.jpg




On the topic of coins that double as units of weight, US nickels ($0.05) have always weighed 5.00 grams since their introduction shortly after the end of the Civil War in 1866, so $10 in nickels = 1 kilogram.
 

Outdated

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
was the only time that the 2d made an appearance, aside from maundy money.
I did a search myself and discovered the exact same thing. My grandmother showed me a two penny coin when I was a kid and I just thought it was money like all the rest. The old one pound note was a huge thing too.

[Edit] we changed to decimal in 1966
 

Nitro

Admin/Immoral Turpitude
Staff member
Admin
V.I.P Member
I thought it was the top of the thumb, maybe that goes back to old Egyptian times. No doubt you know much better.

There was some good about Britain although I don't think you'd concede. The EU, back when it was the EEC copied our British Standards, just changed the name.

You're very aggressive in your posts, you needn't worry.
There's not really a "British " for you to hate.

The union is going down the swanny so is the Commonwealth so it seems on the news lately.
I'm English btw.
I don't get the hatred part at all.

I am only stating how our failed system is approached here.
I am 100% behind the metric system, but most of my equipment I use isn't metric.
For instance, the leadscrew on my Logan 922 is 8 TPI (threads per inch), a pitch of 0.125". That's 3.175 mm, not a terribly convenient number from which to derive the standard metric pitches. The purpose of metric transposing gears is simply to scale that pitch into a more useful value that can be divided or multiplied, using common gear ratios, to get the standard metric pitches.

So no matter what system I use, in some manner I will always use what works the easiest for me, which is to translate all of the dimensioning to suit the equipment being used.
 

Forest Cat

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Inches in the Nordics:

In Norway an inch is called a "tomme".
Denmark, also a "tomme".
Sweden, "tum".
Finland, "tuuma".
Iceland, "þumlungur".

Things are pretty normal until you get to Iceland, then everything goes sideways, no one understands what they are doing there. :)
 

Outdated

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I love this. Thanks for sharing. It's a Pygmy Possum by the way.

It reminded me for some reason of being a little kid and other kids told me how to make a lizard let go if it bites you. The trick is to relax and make it think it killed you already, the more you struggle the harder they bite. I practised on a Blue Tongue that lived in our yard.

Blue Tongue Lizard.jpg
 

Magna

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I just ate a persimmon (fuyu type) for the first time in my life and I thought it sucked. Almost devoid of flavor. I composted the rest rather than finishing eating it.
 

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