• Welcome to Autism Forums, a friendly forum to discuss Aspergers Syndrome, Autism, High Functioning Autism and related conditions.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Private Member only forums for more serious discussions that you may wish to not have guests or search engines access to.
    • Your very own blog. Write about anything you like on your own individual blog.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon! Please also check us out @ https://www.twitter.com/aspiescentral

Post something Weird or Random

WhitewaterWoman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
This story makes me happy. It's really upsetting for the tourism industry but I see them as being responsible for much of the destruction of native habitats in my country.

As a result of global warming salt water crocodiles are now able to range as far south as Brisbane. Who knows, maybe in another decade or so they could get as far south as Sydney. The wildlife is fighting back.


Crocs used to be rare here - just a few hanging out in the Everglades. But now they are found as far north as Tampa.
 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
Crocs used to be rare here - just a few hanging out in the Everglades. But now they are found as far north as Tampa.
I didn't know you had crocs there at all, I thought you only had alligators. You mentioned once before that you are also cursed with cane toads, check the size of this one:

 
Last edited:

Shevek

Well-Known Member
Pogo1.jpg
Pogo2.jpg
 

WhitewaterWoman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I didn't know you had crocs there at all, I thought you only had alligators. You mentioned once before that you are also cursed with cane toads, check the size of this one:


American crocodiles. Rare. Not aggressive like yours.

American Crocodile: Species Profile - Everglades National Park (U.S. National Park Service)

Wicked cane toad!
 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
One interesting thing bout gators is that they have tremendous pressure closing their mouths, but almost no ability to open their mouths against any resistance, hence…
Salties are the same. They remove 200 to 300 every year from the built up areas around Darwin Harbour, only the biggest ones, and a simple bit of duct tape holds their massive jaws shut and also keeps their legs pinned to their sides.
 

Owliet

The Hidden One.
V.I.P Member
Not sure if you're joking or not there. The world's largest living reptiles. Great for tourists, they swim in water, they walk on land, and if you don't climb a big enough tree they can also jump.

View attachment 94820

View attachment 94821
That boat one…all it would have taken the crocodile to get one of them is to come up at an a Different angle. And naturally people just film it.….
There's quite a few countries that have kyaking whale tours, Australia too, but I reckon getting too close to orcas might not be such a clever idea. A handy snack served on a bright yellow tray.

View attachment 94822
It’s actually really rare that orcas attack people. There’s no record of them eating or attacking a person in the wild — although I’d argue that the teenage male orcas “playing” with the boats off the coast of Portugal may be a specific attack. Only cases of people being attacked and killed by Orcas (Especially by the late Tillikum) is in Sea world. But then, I’d argue that it’s hardly surprising with these complex intelligent animals. But still, I would never go near an open water or continue heading towards a dangerous animal. Some people are just mad…then wonder why they get eaten.
Orca in some places have been known to attack boats, but I've never heard of them eating people. Even Great White Sharks just taste us and leave.
Before Whale Watching was a thing, some naturalists in British Columbia, Canada, wanted to protect a shallow, gravel-bottom bay that the Orca used each spring to rub their bellies on. A timber company wanted to fill the bay with log booms. Nobody was worried about the "big fish." Not knowing what else to try, the pro-whale folk invited the Cabinet out for a day on the water, hoping they would at least see some whales. They got lucky, and found a whole pod. Then, they saw a birth. THEN, the baby swam past the visitors, and the whole pod followed it, lined up two-by-two like a naval review. The bay was saved. That said, Orca are certainly nasty to other marine life. Some pods only eat fish, but others go after mammals, and may kill a lot and eat only a little.
That’s true — although there are some Great White cases where they have attacked and eaten a whole human before. The most recent one being in Australia last February with that poor man.

I have to admit, the one animal that I really wouldnt want to be around is the leopard seal.
Sweet baby Jesus that's a big one! Teaching the crocodiles to associate a boat full of people with dinner time... :) I don't see how that could go wrong.
I know! Why would you even risk it?!
 

Attachments

  • F5D1A10A-C47D-435E-AADA-3DF1F40C39C6.jpeg
    F5D1A10A-C47D-435E-AADA-3DF1F40C39C6.jpeg
    14.7 KB · Views: 6

Forest Cat

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I have to admit, the one animal that I really wouldnt want to be around is the leopard seal.

I had to read a little about leopard seals, it says they are 2.5-3.5 meters long and weighs 200-600 kilos! And they eat penquins and other seals, among other things. I didn't know they were so big and mean.
 

Owliet

The Hidden One.
V.I.P Member
I had to read a little about leopard seals, it says they are 2.5-3.5 meters long and weighs 200-600 kilos! And they eat penquins and other seals, among other things. I didn't know they were so big and mean.
The way they eat penguins is horrible. I get thats why they Are designed to do so but man, would hate to be a penguin. They have a hard life. The only natural predator of the leopard seal is the orca and even then, they are rarely hunted. I did read that the leopard seal has some recorded attempted stalking of humans. With one potential fatality.
 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
It’s actually really rare that orcas attack people. There’s no record of them eating or attacking a person in the wild — although I’d argue that the teenage male orcas “playing” with the boats off the coast of Portugal may be a specific attack.
There's a large croc in the Darwin Museum that was accidentally drowned when they were trying to relocate him. The locals called him Sweetheart because he never attacked a human. He did however attack boats with outboard motors, and when they captured him they discovered why - he had huge scars on his back from where boats had run over the top of him. He never attacked the boat itself, he'd just rip the motors off the back of them.

 

Luca

charm & chaos
V.I.P Member
Definitely random, but I wanted to share this somewhat amusing (but hopefully inspiring) story.

Obviously, Enzo is a Pointer (an “English” Pointer or “Field” Pointer.)
My best friend (who is the one who rehomed Enzo with me after rescuing him from a neglectful owner) breeds these types of Pointers. He has Enzo’s father, half-brother, and a few cousins. Who are nothing like Enzo.

I have always loved Pointers but I never wanted one. I’m obviously more inclined towards extra-large, powerful, dominant working dogs.
I have a lot of experience with Pointers obviously, and I always thought they were “too docile,” “too scatterbrained,” “too effervescent,” and “too distractable.” I didn’t think a Pointer would be a good watchdog, a good house dog, or a good training partner. Obedience trials and service work seemed totally out of the question.

My experience has often been that Pointers have two types of personalities: there are show dogs, and there are hunting dogs.
Show Pointers are not very clever and kind of boring, and hunting line dogs are exuberant and driven, and don’t have an “off switch.”
My best friend’s Pointers are a combination of both lines, and they have great temperaments and are easygoing and friendly but they do have a lot of instinct and a lot of drive. But none of his dogs are as intelligent as Enzo and none of them are very inclined towards obedience or agility competitions. They have two modes; show, and hunt. And that’s perfectly fine, because that’s what they’re bred for and that’s what he wants them to do.
But I am way more of a performance breeder than a show breeder. Conformation is important to me as well but it’s secondary and I have had dogs that did not do well in the show ring at all, and I was fine with that because they excelled at many other things. When I select my dogs I am looking primarily for trainability, intelligence, eagerness to please, working drive, personality, and ability to connect with me as a partner/handler (and above all, health and temperament.)

Obviously, my primary breeds are Dogo Argentinos and Dobermans. I grew up on a farm with working Border Collies and while I will always love them and admire their intelligence and work ethic, I find a lot of them a bit neurotic and intense, and definitely not suited to my current lifestyle (living in a small house with multiple dogs in a semi-suburban neighborhood and working 6 days a week.)
They are also a bit too small for me at 25 to 40 pounds. I do have a small dog currently but she is a rescue (Puerto Rican stray dog found after a hurricane) and she’s an exception to my “no small dogs” rule because she is special and she really needed a home so I couldn’t pass up the opportunity. She is a great little dog and I love her dearly.
But I prefer extra large working dogs and especially “bully” dogs.

So I’ve shared Enzo’s story a few times on here but I’ll give a basic rundown.
I was originally only supposed to rehabilitate and foster him and send him on his way to a forever home. He came to me with a semi-recovered broken hip from falling from a truck bed and all kinds of temperament issues. He was very reactive and aggressive. For the first few days I couldn’t even touch him. He was completely traumatized by whatever happened before my friend rescued him. I really wasn’t optimistic.
But that was a year ago.

The amusing part of the story is how wrong he proved me about his breed and what they’re capable of. It’s a lesson in “any dog can excel at anything in the right hands.”
He’s admittedly a lot more intelligent than a lot of Pointers. But he has a great personality too.
I have accomplished more with him than I have with any dog in the past decade that I’ve been professionally training dogs. He excels at obedience trials and he has earned titles in numerous other sports as well.

So I’m glad I didn’t sell him short. A good example of not judging a book by its cover and letting a dog teach you instead of the other way around. Any dog can achieve any goal you set for them with dedication, passion, and a lot of patience.
Just thought that was a story worth sharing.

6B119C12-E63A-4D66-B357-4C18B7714D61.jpeg
3A4BA2E1-FC3F-4056-BAF1-68D0014EB1AE.jpeg
 

Luca

charm & chaos
V.I.P Member
I'm guessing you're not a yorkie person. :) ButI think they are good guard dogs, they jump up and ferociously nibble on your ankle if you mess with them. ;)
I don’t dislike small dogs at all, I think they’re cute! I’m just way more of a big dog person in terms of what I like to live with.
I do like Yorkies because they have a ton of attitude :)
 

New Threads

Top Bottom