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Nerds or Geeks...?

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
But it has lost those meanings and now is used mainly to describe any kind of enthusiast. There are car geeks, computer geeks, train geeks, math geeks etc.

Yes, lots of meanings to lots of people. Though on occasion I still hear them used in a disparaging way. Though even then they can have different meanings in that context as well.

I suspect such terms will remain somewhat fluid in society...and may continue to morph. Maybe into something completely different in time. Though on occasion it can be amusing to hear someone say something terribly disparaging without really knowing it.

Sometimes what should become "lost" manages to linger. :oops:

Reminds me that I haven't heard of anyone hijacking the term "dweeb" to mean something more positive.
 
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Crossbreed

Neur-D Missionary ☝️
V.I.P Member
Seriously I think we weren't and aren't "a subculture". I don't know about you, but we are plenty individual thank you.
When I was socially snubbed in elementary school, I sought out friends among the other "outcasts."

There is a reason why we connect here so well. And it isn't at the expense of our individuality.
 

Crossbreed

Neur-D Missionary ☝️
V.I.P Member
Reminds me that I haven't heard of anyone hijacking the term "dweeb" to mean something more positive.
full

Nerd-Venn Diagram
 
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Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Nerd-Venn Diagram
full

That's just a graphic. It doesn't validate anything but your point of view in your own mind.

In the practical world I live in terms like geek, nerd, dweeb and dork are all more often used in a disparaging way than a virtuous one.
 
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Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
You have never heard of "geek chic" or "adorkable?"

Should I? :confused:

I accept being in a social and neurological minority. However I just don't feel compelled to enhance our image however it's perceived with various unnecessary adjectives.

I suppose our NT counterparts could make the same assertion if they wanted to. Yet we all are who and what we are. Regardless of semantics designed to promote or disparage who we appear to be by others.

I'd rather be called by my name- and not any label.
 
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Tom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I first heard it (Geeks) being used in a new way in the late 70's. Surfers used it to describe beginners/people who got in the way, etc.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Surfers used it to describe beginners/people who got in the way, etc.

LOL, yeah my cousins in Southern California used to use that term. Haven't heard it used that way in years though. Probably something Bruce Brown would have said long before that. Not a term of endearment. :cool:

220px-The_Endless_Summer_%281966_Cinema_V_poster%29.jpg
 
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Wolfgangus Faldestolius

Little notes from an armchair
When I was socially snubbed in elementary school, I sought out friends among the other "outcasts."

There is a reason why we connect here so well. And it isn't at the expense of our individuality.

Actually there is a lot more than one reason. And we are not "a subculture".

And I sought out friends of rather varied types if I had the idea or opportunity, and varied types sought my friendship. I was moderately often a bit ignored in between times and that was just a neutral enough fact. Whilst there would temporarily be a football mad bunch or a rock concert bunch or a bunch of hooligans, and I might be frightened of "them", they all seemed individuals within each bunch.

The only harmful dynamic in a relationship with me below about 17 and a half came from me, once.

You might see yourself as "a subculture" and you have no place to gratuitously include us in "it".

Yes there's a lecture circuit, books by autistic authors about their experiences. Those are ad hoc interests. ("Odd hack". ;) )

If we want to reminisce about our schooling difficulties and living solutions, we do so.

If we are interested in words and other hobbies, or neurology, we do so.

This was a superb forum precisely because it wasn't cliquey. We include you because you are a member of it like we are.
 

Rasputin

ASD / Aspie
V.I.P Member
I use
"Savant" is already used colloquially.
"Knowing" old men? I'm not sure how age figures into it, unless it is to emphasize experience.
  • A "polymath?"
  • A "Renaissance man?"
  • A jack-of-all-trades?
  • A "MacGyver...?"

What do you call ASD-1 w/giftedness?
 

Crossbreed

Neur-D Missionary ☝️
V.I.P Member
...and you have no place to gratuitously include us in "it".
Fair enough.
What do you call ASD-1 w/giftedness?
"Tweek" < "twice-exceptional geek," though "dweeb" [< duo] is very close to working, linguistically speaking...
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Since neurd/neur-D covers all neuro-diversity, they work, too.

(Linguistic FYI: originally, "Christian" was used as a derogatory term for the believers in Antioch. It was intended to mean "Christ's-slaves," with "slaves" being regarded as the lowest class of citizens. Said believers decided "Yes, we like it," and adopted it amongst themselves. I see the same dynamic happening with nerd, geek, dork, etc. being embraced in a positive fashion.)
 
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Rasputin

ASD / Aspie
V.I.P Member
Fair enough.

"Tweek" < "twice-exceptional geek," though "dweeb" [< duo] is very close to working, linguistically speaking...
full


Since neurd/neur-D covers all neuro-diversity, they work, too.

I was not familiar with the term "twice exceptional", but after googleing and reading the description it seems appropriate for me.
 

Rasputin

ASD / Aspie
V.I.P Member
Fair enough.

"Tweek" < "twice-exceptional geek," though "dweeb" [< duo] is very close to working, linguistically speaking...
full


Since neurd/neur-D covers all neuro-diversity, they work, too.

(Linguistic FYI: originally, "Christian" was used as a derogatory term for the believers in Antioch. It was intended to mean "Christ's-slaves," with "slaves" being regarded as the lowest class of citizens. Said believers decided "Yes, we like it," and adopted it amongst themselves. I see the same dynamic happening with nerd, geek, dork, etc. being embraced in a positive fashion.)

If I have to have a label, "tweek' is not bad.
 

Thinx

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Personally, I like Dweeb :rolleyes:

Reclaiming labels that were used derogatively is part of a process of self empowerment in cultural dynamics.

However, the nature of who we are implies we may not (all) embrace such an idea.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Reclaiming labels that were used derogatively is part of a process of self empowerment in cultural dynamics.

I'm inclined to view such a perspective as being precarious at best. Where the most likely possibility of that happening successfully is when such a term is limited to use only within a specific group of people.

Here in this community I can call myself a "geek" without any concerns of prejudice. Yet if I use such terms outside of my own group, something is likely to be "lost in translation". Where I risk being persecuted socially, without any consideration to my technical prowess with computers. Where there are no guarantees that those outside your social, cultural or neurological group will even want to understand, let alone relate to.

Case and point: Two black men recognize each other and cordially use a word they'd never normally use outside of their own race and culture. A white person who knows both of them, decides to use the same word to innocently acknowledge both of them. Trouble ensues.
 
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Thinx

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I'm inclined to view such a perspective as being precarious at best. Where the most likely possibility of that happening successfully is when such a term is limited to use only within a specific group of people.

Here in this community I can call myself a "geek" without any concerns of prejudice. Yet if I use such terms outside of my own group, something is likely to be "lost in translation". Where I risk being persecuted socially, without any consideration to my technical prowess with computers. Where there are no guarantees that those outside your social, cultural or neurological group will even want to understand, let alone relate to.

Case and point: Two black men recognize each other and cordially use a word they'd never normally use outside of their own race and culture. A white person who knows both of them, decides to use the same word to innocently acknowledge both of them. Trouble ensues.

Yes indeed, it's about a group taking back power by reclaiming the language used by oppressors, so someone from outside the group can't use the words in the same way, without risking being seen as echoing the oppressor. That doesn't mean it's not an effective form of self empowerment for the group. But I meant it as an observation, not a recommendation. Each to their own.
 

Nervous Rex

High-functioning autistic
V.I.P Member
When I do really dumb stuff for fun, I call myself a dork. I'll often say to my wife, "You know you're married to a total dork, right?"

Example dorkiness:
We finished a jigsaw puzzle and I wanted to see how much you'd have to solve working from the edges inward to get exactly half the puzzle. Here's what I got:
Puzzle.jpg
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Yes indeed, it's about a group taking back power by reclaiming the language used by oppressors, so someone from outside the group can't use the words in the same way, without risking being seen as echoing the oppressor. That doesn't mean it's not an effective form of self empowerment for the group. But I meant it as an observation, not a recommendation. Each to their own.

When I venture beyond the confines of my front door, I'm basically in the NT world whether I like it or not. How I interpret or use such terms is of no consequence to a vast social majority for which I am not part of.

I just don't find such a social dynamic to be "empowering" at all. Similar to why I make a concerted effort not to tell anyone and everyone that I'm on the spectrum of autism. Where more than likely it involves consequences rather than any sense of empowerment. "Need-to-know only".

I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree. "Each to their own" as you say.
 
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