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Do you want to be immortal?

Do you want to be immortal?


  • Total voters
    26

330

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Their must be a logical explanation bottom line, science, God or maybe even Aliens, death will give the answer. Either way being agnostic works for me.
I agree I am the same . It just have much anxiety knowing I will finally know the answer when I die. But won’t be alive to explain it to people.

Agnostic is the only logical choice for me as well
 

Ronald Zeeman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Thanks I am starting to dabble in physics . It has always intrigued me.You seem very knowledgeable about it.
I've seen lots of theories come and go steady state to big bang. Really gets my mind going. My dream when I was younger was to become a theoretical physicist. just was not bright enough.
 

Ronald Zeeman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I agree I am the same . It just have muca week beh anxiety knowing I will finally know the answer when I die. But won’t be alive to explain it to people.

Agnostic is the only logical choice for me as well
that's what my buddy and I discussed, a week before he died, he would be unable.to inform me whether I was on the right track.
 

mysterionz

oh hamburgers!
V.I.P Member
D1A707DA-57A2-4E4D-AFEC-36C533DA6BAF.jpeg


he is the true immortal. Cannot die at all.
 

Ronald Zeeman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Thirty years ago, I made a new friend.at a new job he was bright did not know any physics until he discovered Bell's theorem drove him nuts, he was in good company Einstein was not thrilled, either. What bothered me was length could not be absolute and why did no one else notice this. Hawking hinted at this but did not follow through.
 

330

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
@Ronald Zeeman

Interesting, I don’t know if it being bright or is to look at the world in a very unconventional way the details we all miss is what makes a great physicist. I have been wondering about this .

Also your friend is right
 

Ronald Zeeman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
@Ronald Zeeman

Interesting, I don’t know if it being bright or is to look at the world in a very unconventional way the details we all miss is what makes a great physicist. I have been wondering about this .

Also your friend is right
If you follow my physics thread, you will notice the pros us mathematics I just use what I can see in my head what amazes me we are converging.
 

330

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
If you follow my physics thread, you will notice the pros us mathematics I just use what I can see in my head what amazes me we are converging.
I have been following that thread . Some of the math language seems so confusing to me that you guys use . But I am determined to work harder at it someday
 

Ronald Zeeman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
My math background is high school math grade thirteen. Technically one year of university. IF you have an aptitude for mathematics should be easy to learn. I just quoted some mathematical techniques in my threadlike set theory pretty simple stuff once you learn it. each time in the past when a breakthrough happened in physics. they used obscure at the time mathematics. Heisenberg used matrices. just a fancy way of solving multiple. equations concurrently. Glen-Mann used group theory. Something that was not taught in high school 50 years ago probably is now for an undergraduate in mathematics. Einstein used non-Euclidean geometry.
 

The Pandector

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I have to envy anyone who has a life they never want to end. I fear I offend the Lord on this one; I appreciate the opportunity to join him forever, but struggle trying to be grateful for the gift of life. I’ve rarely had a happy hour; never had a happy day. My significant accomplishments in life were in spite of the life I’ve lived.

My parents made no bones that they didn’t want me, and that set the tone for a long and difficult haul. Most people prefer not to have me around and I don’t blame them.

I don’t try to work with people because I know a better way and don’t care to explain it. When I joke just for levity, someone will be offended. When I have a better idea, nobody understands it until I implement it. I’m fine with numbers, but hate paying bills so badly that I sometimes get late. People sometimes dislike me at a glance, while others learn it over time. I’m a weird person.

My ears are so weird that I have a hard time with a cell phone. My eyes pick up things I wish they wouldn’t. My mind constantly identifies and resolves problems that are not my place to solve. I am lonely.

Let’s see… just getting started, but you get the idea. My faith overcomes the fear of death, mostly, so I don’t have that influence. If the Lord has work for me, I’m fine to stick around. Otherwise…
 

Ronald Zeeman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
The strangest thing about my stroke was I no longer worry about death, brain damage who knows, was the message delivered, who knows Was this the purpose of my life who knows. my main concern is the effect on family if something happened to me I saw the look in my siblings faces while in the hospital as they had just lost their oldest brother a few months prior.
 
Last edited:

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
It's My Birthday!
The strangest thing about my stroke was I no longer worry about death....
When I was 27 years old I found out that I had a nasty allergy, the only way you find out about this allergy is when a doctor gives you a needle and you die. In my case it was a free dentist attached to the side of a large modern hospital, lucky really.

According to the dentist I was clinically dead for 00:01:17, or 77 seconds, he had been giving me CPR and counting. By the time orderlies and a gurney arrived to take me in to the hospital proper I was coming back to myself again.

During that time I Did Not Exist. There was no me. I was gone. The only white light I saw was the flouros on the ceiling as I came around.

I was never religiously minded to start with, now that I know what happens when you die I feel more content about that.
 

Vindiesel

Well-Known Member
Immortal (if my aging process stopped now at 36)....I feel I have enough emotional disconnect that I could build relationships, enjoy people for who they are and celebrate their deaths with no catatrophic trauma or long grieving. Plus I want to know what happens to this planet and all the chaos that will ensue.
 

Dagan

Well-Known Member
Immortal (if my aging process stopped now at 36)....I feel I have enough emotional disconnect that I could build relationships, enjoy people for who they are and celebrate their deaths with no catatrophic trauma or long grieving. Plus I want to know what happens to this planet and all the chaos that will ensue.

This is a very solid point. I can handle death better than anyone I know, really. I've discussed it in therapy, and yes, it's supposedly another indicator or aspect to being autistic. It's common she said. It's not a bad thing at all. I just process it rationally first or only, and most everyone else is emotional first or only and for possibly long periods of time. Anyway, this is a solid reason why so many or all of us could handle being immortal. For the same reason, I think I / we would be candidates for traveling to and living on Mars, if that ever happens.
 

Ed#

Weird NT
I'd like to be immortal in the spiritual sense, but not the physically embodied-here-on-Earth sense. The latter would surely get boring after a few hundred years. However, I very much like the idea of my soul living other lifetimes, including other lifeforms and on other planets. I'd be up for that.
 

MildredHubble

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Quantum Immortality! If that theory is true, then we are all going to live forever. Sadly no one else will. That may seem nonsensical but it would be true.

If the Many Worlds interpretation of Quantum Physics is true then it would be possible that you could live forever. If you die, then there would be a version of you that didn't in an alternate universe.

So you can take that to it's logical conclusion and realise, a dead "you" has no consciousness, only an alive "you" would. So in every scenario there would be a "you" that survived whatever threat you faced. The "you" that survives is you!
 

The Pandector

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I was raised to believe that Christian faith was an intellectual failure. The only Christian in two generations of that family, I couldn’t understand why the obvious is so hard to accept. Those were frequently my thoughts in my youth, and I was judged badly for my faith.

When my mom’s husband grew close to death, the entire family had a mind boggling paradigm shift. Suddenly, he was going to be sitting on a hillside with their dead dog, waiting for Mom to join them. Within months, they developed a shared vision of an idyllic eternity together. His only message to me was, ‘I’ll see you later,’ great emphasis on ‘later.’

I don’t gamble, but I think this is what you call covering your bets. You’re so very certain, until you see your kids’ lunch money circling the drain, and you draw back and place a different sort of wager.

You’re welcome to think otherwise, but I don’t believe the afterlife is simply a projection of what we want it to be. This world certainly isn’t what I would want it to be; can’t imagine the next one is. Whatever it is, it is, regardless of what we think is fair or comforting.

This universe is so much more than we can comprehend. Hard for me to swallow that reality is just an affirmation of what we’re willing to believe. If there is life after death, we don’t get to imagine it into existence. It is what it is.
 

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