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Deathly job interviews

Aspychata

Serenity waves, beachy vibes
V.I.P Member
Why are job interviews so stressful? I have pretty great control over my mouth and imagined next possible foot in mouth scenario. But job interviews are hit or miss. Today, we were interviewing in the lobby. Not my piece of cake but that seems to be the standard in alot of places these days. I feel like day-old bread, like couldn't we sit in your office or a conference room? Like dude- l drove all the way here, used hair products, burned fuel to drive here with all the other nut cases on the road. What do other posters think?
What about the managers that won't hire you because you are older then them or don't speak the same language as they do?
Why can't they just say screw the we don't discriminate- don't bother applying because what's left of you is best left at home.
 
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I have to wonder if sometimes the stress aspect may be something they actually go for on purpose.

After all, if an employee cant work under stressful situations (like someone in retail dealing with holidays) then they might not be so good in said position.

I never personally had much issue with interviews. I simply told the interviewer exactly what they wanted to hear, and that was that.

As for the other bits:

If you're older than them, they might feel a bit intimidated. Managers want to feel superior.

And for language, that one, honestly I can understand. If you dont speak whatever language they do, that can make for very difficult communication. If the management cant get their messages across to you... you wont last long. Communication is critical in any job at all.
 
My problem with interviews is that I don't communicate very well verbally, especially when stressed. I can write well enough to be published in peer reviewed journals, but ask me about anything verbally and all my thoughts will get mixed up somewhere between my brain and my mouth, even if I am the leading expert in the subject. This obviously doesn't make a great impression in interviews! Also the whole point is to have a group of people judge you, and for someone who struggles with anxiety over being judged (me) that is hell.
 
I don't speak Spanish - at least enough of it.
My Spanish just barely got me through in Mexico for a 2 week stay.
 
My problem with interviews is that I don't communicate very well verbally, especially when stressed. I can write well enough to be published in peer reviewed journals, but ask me about anything verbally and all my thoughts will get mixed up somewhere between my brain and my mouth, even if I am the leading expert in the subject. This obviously doesn't make a great impression in interviews! Also the whole point is to have a group of people judge you, and for someone who struggles with anxiety over being judged (me) that is hell.

Exactly- for some unexplainable reason when we are put on the spot in interview land - we discombulate for some serious seconds. Like we literally draw a blank- and l can usually come back quickly if l had coffee or went in charged and read my interview book. But my brain gets into an argument and says- you are old- they aren't going hire you. Like why am trying?
My last job- my boss made me wait an hour-he finally interviewed me and hired me. Most people would not wait an hour. My boss before that, l had to complain because she wouldn't interview me, but the other manager called and said she needed to hire someone.
 
Interviews are meant to be purposed for the company. So, they need to see if you are okay under stress and confusion and expect you to ask the questions.

Many companies don't try to purposely stress you out (I hate the ones I hear that do) or purposely leave things unclear, but many companies do want to see how you interact in such environments. Don't go in expecting accommodations. Try your best to work with each situation as it is. If you really need accommodations badly and you think this would help you more than hurt you with job prospects, then look for something comparable to OVR (Office of Vocational Rehabilitation) in PA if you're in a state other than PA.
 
I immediately blamed myself- that the manager didn't want to hire me- l didn't think it was a test. It could be the person was busy too.
 
The only person I know that actually enjoys interviews was my gay, con artist ex. (descriptive purposes only) I think he just liked conning people, and was very likeable with anyone he's ever met. He always knew what to say, how to say it and even could (and did) fool polygraphs.
Me on a polygraph, they'd probably say I was lying when I gave them my name. lol
I think most places realize that the person being interviewed is going to be nervous, and if not, I've always let them know first thing that I was very nervous and I actually think that helped every time.
 
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Is there anything quite so frustrating as a job hunting? Probably, but it still sucks. Most of the jobs I've had have been with companies that were truly desperate, or in industries that would hire pretty much anyone. I can't tell you how many times I've sat across a desk from someone, filling out questionnaires so blatant that I wondered "Do they want me to give the 'good' answer, or to tell the truth? They'll know I'm lying, but is that what they're looking for?".

I think a big portion of the autistic social experience is repressing the urge to shake people by the shoulders while shouting "Say what you mean!".
 
Is there anything quite so frustrating as a job hunting? Probably, but it still sucks. Most of the jobs I've had have been with companies that were truly
desperate, or in industries that would hire pretty much anyone. I can't tell you how many times I've sat across a desk from someone, filling out questionnaires so blatant that I wondered "Do they want me to give the 'good' answer, or to tell the truth? They'll know I'm lying, but is that what they're looking for?".

I think a big portion of the autistic social experience is repressing the urge to shake people by the shoulders while shouting "Say what you mean!".

Good points, say what you mean, are you really hiring, do you hire anybody that is over 25, do you hire people who only speak English, do you only hire only people who can talk about football with you, are you only hiring me because of a get chance-shot-lucky at sex , (yes, at this ripe old old age it can happen, at a store l won't go back because the guy made it clear what he wants). Is this a fake interview? Are you hiring me because you can get away with being a asswipe, but you know woman need jobs? Check any of the boxes that apply.
 
Good luck, you'll get something I m sure. I don't shine at interview unless it's very much in the area I am well qualified in. Usually I have got jobs by being the best qualified and knowing how to do the job. But that only works for me in specialist niche areas where the jobs are hard to fill. However, it's always made work interesting and rewarding to have such skills. Have you thought of specialising in something you would enjoy?
 
Don't lose heart and hold your nerve.
Easier said than done, I know.

I'd sit in that interview hot seat and try to be all the job spec' required.
A convincing act. Particularly when younger.

The easiest panel interview I remember was for the position of traffic clerk with a major logistics company.
Only because I knew precisely what I was talking about.
I could handle most areas of the job with my eyes closed and one hand tied behind my back, so to speak.

I didn't have to act to fit the job spec'.
I was comfortable because I had the experience and knowledge.

It was like having a discussion with people who have the same interest :)

I've had less success with interviews as I've gotten older.
Part of me thinks I'm less of a people pleaser now.
Not so much acting involved.
 
I’ve had some trouble with job interviews where they wanted to test how well I do with unexpected problems. I once had an interview that went quite well, up to the point where they asked me how many seats are on a Boeing 747. I told them I didn’t know and they repeatedly told me to think about it or otherwise make a guess. I told them again that I didn’t know and I don’t like guessing if I don’t have the faintest idea. I was caught off guard so much that I was really nervous during the rest of the interview.
 
Why are job interviews so stressful? I have pretty great control over my mouth and imagined next possible foot in mouth scenario. But job interviews are hit or miss. Today, we were interviewing in the lobby. Not my piece of cake but that seems to be the standard in alot of places these days. I feel like day-old bread, like couldn't we sit in your office or a conference room? Like dude- l drove all the way here, used hair products, burned fuel to drive here with all the other nut cases on the road. What do other posters think?
What about the managers that won't hire you because you are older then them or don't speak the same language as they do?
Why can't they just say screw the we don't discriminate- don't bother applying because what's left of you is best left at home.

Before I accepted my current job seven years ago, I interviewed for another higher paying position that I was well qualified for. I had to sit through three interviews in succession. One technical interview with several people, one interview with HR, and one psychological interview with the hiring manager. I heard I did not get the position because I appeared nervous or stressed to the hiring manager. I was later offered a lower paying position which I accepted.

There is no possibility for promotion from my current position, but it's probably the best that I can do given the ASD. Appearances and stress during the interview will kill your chances for getting hired.
 
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I once had an interview that went quite well, up to the point where they asked me how many seats are on a Boeing 747.
According to Google/Wikipedia,

"The 747-400 can carry 416 passengers in a typical three-class layout, 524 passengers in a typical two-class layout, or 660 passengers in a high–density one-class configuration."

That question reminds me of this scene,
Monty Python and the Holy Grail: The Bridge of Death (1975)
 
According to Google/Wikipedia,

"The 747-400 can carry 416 passengers in a typical three-class layout, 524 passengers in a typical two-class layout, or 660 passengers in a high–density one-class configuration."
Yeah, I googled it afterwards, but I still don’t have a clue why it was deemed a relevant question for my job interview.
 
I’ve had some trouble with job interviews where they wanted to test how well I do with unexpected problems. I once had an interview that went quite well, up to the point where they asked me how many seats are on a Boeing 747. I told them I didn’t know and they repeatedly told me to think about it or otherwise make a guess. I told them again that I didn’t know and I don’t like guessing if I don’t have the faintest idea. I was caught off guard so much that I was really nervous during the rest of the interview.

At least they didn't aggressively ask you if you had "picked your toes in Poughkeepsie". :rolleyes:

Indeed, maybe catching you off guard was their whole point. But damn, that kind of drama I don't need in any job interview. :eek:
 
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