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Current book(s) you're reading?

Mr. Stevens

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Alice Munro. An excellent writer.
Yes, so far I'm very impressed. She has a patience, power, and sense of observation I see in writers like William Maxwell, David Malouf, or even Jeanette Winterson and Julian Barnes. Maybe even Jane Gardam. I tried Philip Roth recently and it was so showy and hollow. The opposite.
 

WhitewaterWoman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I don’t think much of Roth either. I don’t know the other authors, or at least don’t remember the names. Not an infrequent occurrence I’m afraid.
Will put them on my list to try.
 

Mr. Stevens

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
View with a Grain of Sand: Selected Poems
 

Jeff T

Well-Known Member
A repeat- The Brave Cowboy by Edward Abbey
---A horseman not willing to be a part of 1950's progress.

A movie closely following the book's plot was produced starring Kirk Douglas.
The movie is unusual in that most of the dialog is between the protagonist
and his steed-in-training, rather than just being a typical western movie prop.
Douglas has said it was his favorite movie to star in. It was not distributed much.
Full version:
 
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Aeolienne

Well-Known Member
The Good Ancestor: How to think long term in a short-term world by Roman Krznaric
I Belong Here: A journey along the backbone of Britain by Anita Sethi
 
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WhitewaterWoman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I’m reading Morning Star: A Novel by Karl Ove Knausgard.

He has an incredible ability to eek out the essence of each moment from a wide variety of personalities.

I am bogged down by one chapter in which the narrator is so creepy it makes my skin crawl.
 

Owliet

The Hidden One.
V.I.P Member
I have quite a few at the moment —but my dad gave me some Terry Pratchett books to read yesterday, so I hav e started on the Color of Magic. =)
 

Forest Cat

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I’m reading Morning Star: A Novel by Karl Ove Knausgard.

He has an incredible ability to eek out the essence of each moment from a wide variety of personalities.

I am bogged down by one chapter in which the narrator is so creepy it makes my skin crawl.

He has a real talent for getting all the details in there. :) Did you read "My Struggle"? That was looong.
 

WhitewaterWoman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
He has a real talent for getting all the details in there. :) Did you read "My Struggle"? That was looong.
A radio program reviewed My Struggle which is how I heard of him. So when a book of his popped up on Amazon specials list, I bought Morning Star for kindle for 1.99.

I read a lot and can’t afford to purchase books at the regular price and don’t have easy access to a library.

The translation seems to be excellent. The English grammar is better than most native English writers.
 

Forest Cat

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
A radio program reviewed My Struggle which is how I heard of him. So when a book of his popped up on Amazon specials list, I bought Morning Star for kindle for 1.99.

I read a lot and can’t afford to purchase books at the regular price and don’t have easy access to a library.

The translation seems to be excellent. The English grammar is better than most native English writers.

When that guy writes about something mundane like making breakfast one morning, it turns into a series of at least 3 books. :) The thing about "My Struggle" is that he wrote about his personal life, wife, friends, people he had met and it was often a bit personal, so he upset some people. He wrote about such personal things and shared so many details from his life. And he was so absorbed with the writing that his wife went through a depression and was hospitalized for a while, it turned into a big thing.
 
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WhitewaterWoman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
When that guy writes about something mundane like making breakfast one morning, it turns into a series of at least 3 books. :) The thing about "My Struggle" is that he wrote about his personal life, wife, friends, people he had met and it was often a bit personal, so he upset some people. He wrote about such personal things and shared so many details from his life. And he was so absorbed with the writing that his wife went through a depression and was hospitalized for a while, it turned into at big thing.
I could see going into a big depression over having my personal habits described in the excruciating detail his writing achieves. Poor lady.

I do find the style oddly attractive. Maybe because he spells out the things that are a mystery to me In terms of how others see themselves and others. At least in Morning Star.
 

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