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Featured Autism Spectrum Neurotype

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by AuBurney Tuckerson, Dec 2, 2019 at 6:40 PM.

  1. "Autism Spectrum Neurotype"

    8 vote(s)
    25.8%
  2. "Autism Spectrum Disorder"

    12 vote(s)
    38.7%
  3. Just stay as "Autism Spectrum"

    9 vote(s)
    29.0%
  4. "Autism Spectrum Brain"

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. Other (Reply)

    2 vote(s)
    6.5%
  6. Any Name

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. "Autism Spectrum Condition"

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. AuBurney Tuckerson

    AuBurney Tuckerson ~GigglesTheAutisticHyena~

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    I think there should be a new name, so people wouldn't keep mistaking Autism as something bad or some kind of illness. I think it should be called something like Autism Spectrum Neurotype. Cause it IS a neurotype just like ADHD, Neurotypical, and Synaesthesia. I mean, these aren't diseases; these aren't health problems. They aren't even medical conditions. They're just different ways the brains developed. Some parts of it can be seen as a disability, but think about it: it's only seen as a disability because the world's built upon neurotypicals. If the world was built upon autistics, there would be no such thing as "too loud". Social skills of autistic people would be considered normal. Communication and develiental milestones of autistics would be considered normal. Neurotypicals would be viewed as the disabled ones or the "weird" ones. Possibly viewed as savants. But because the world's built upon the majority being neurotypical, they view us as disabled or our brains as a mental disorder. What do you think? Should Autism remain being called a "disorder"? Or should that part of the name be changed?
     
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  2. BrokenBoy

    BrokenBoy 戯言使い(Nonsense User)

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    It's totally a disorder. Just because you aren't that affected by it doesn't mean that people like us don't suffer heavily because of our condition. It's completely selfish to say it's not an disorder. Same goes for ADHD.
     
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  3. Fino

    Fino Alex V.I.P Member

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    ADHD includes mood swings, rage, etc. to the point that it's known for those with ADHD to be misdiagnosed with Bipolar. I've never heard of the argument that ADHD isn't a disorder. I've worked with kids with ADHD, and they struggle.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2019 at 12:48 AM
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  4. Crossbreed

    Crossbreed Neur-D Missionary ☝

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    To the OP, it's complicated. I believe that ASD1 fits your clever description of Autism Spectrum Neurotype, but ASD2/3s are ASD1s who have experienced (and not recovered from) a distinct trauma on top of their inherited ASD1. That trauma has been convoluted with autism, even though it is a separate event (that born ASD1s are particularly susceptible to).

    See Autlanders, Thriving Outside of the Box: Autism Subtypes...
     
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  5. Progster

    Progster Gone sideways to the sun V.I.P Member

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    While I don't particularly like the word 'disorder', it doesn't offend me that people use it.

    My suggestion would be 'autism spectrum condition' because 'condition' is a more neutral word that implies a state of being rather than a disorder.
     
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  6. leehart

    leehart Active Member

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    I voted for 1 but totally get why others would vote for disorder. For me neurotype reflects the spectrum element but I know some see Autism as a strength and for others it is debilitating. It is such a diverse neurology that it will be hard to get a name for it that reflects that.

    For instance I think I might be Autistic and I suffer a little now - it is hard and I am always anxious but I am generally safe. My child has Autism and is non-verbal and cant risk assess, they are always happy but not safe. Reflecting such diversity is a challenge.
     
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  7. asperagus

    asperagus A vegetable on the spectrum

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    I give little to no importance to the name, and more importance to it being taken seriously and further researched. I think even NT's have a little bit of ASD (like everyone has a bit of everything).

    I think we need more awareness, but research could help, too. We're getting there (now there are certain therapies out there to help those with AS), but still nothing fully effective across the board.
     
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  8. Streetwise

    Streetwise very cautious contributor V.I.P Member

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    Im a neurotype Im not !a psychiatric label ,brain damage isnt autism ,I suffer because of humans not my neurotype .
     
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  9. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    No question that the term "disorder" remains an unpleasant one to many of us.

    However there's no way to skirt around the likelihood of this as a disorder, particularly with reference to the different levels of ASD as outlined by the DSM-V.

    Perhaps even more so, any consideration of so many comorbid conditions that are undeniably "disorders" themselves. Besides, medical protocols like the DSM and the ICD decide such decisions. Not us.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2019 at 10:29 AM
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  10. s704m

    s704m storm V.I.P Member

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    I love this!! Yes!!
    Also -- I do not believe we are disordered. Neurotypicals call us disordered and say we need a cure because they don't like how our brains work. Their problem - doesn't mean we're wrong, sick, or bad! I like The Aspergian -- we are a different neurotype and they can stick their ASD "cures" where the sun don't shine.
     
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  11. s704m

    s704m storm V.I.P Member

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    Yeah, it's complicated. I'm ASD1 with Trauma/C-PTSD. And I still feel I am autistic as a neurotype, not a disorder. However, years of trauma can go to hell, but I'm also autistic and I think my autistic mind is simply brilliant.
     
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  12. onlything

    onlything Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    This thread makes me wonder if it would be possible to have two official body languages in the future. There are already so many verbal languages from different continents and you have to say that 'our' body language (Aspergian? Autismian? Autish? Neurodiverse?) is quite a bit different than the general one (Common? Neurotypical?). Imagine there being schoolbooks for 'Common Body Language' or 'Autismian Body Language'.

    Sounds interesting, for me at least. Always something to ponder.
     
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  13. Autistamatic

    Autistamatic He's just this guy, you know? V.I.P Member

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    Using a different word such as Neurotype or Phenotype is not disrespectful to those who are autistic and suffer from poor quality of life as a direct result of their impairments. If we insist that those who do not feel they are sick or medically compromised being described as having a disorder because some others feel their autism is a significant hindrance to them we put us all at a disadvantage.

    Using language like "disorder" and even "condition" sets us up to fail in the eyes of those not on the spectrum. It puts us ALL at a disadvantage because those words suggest deficit - being less than the norm as opposed to a different version of "normal" . It leads to marginalisation, insult and poor treatment such as difficulty finding work, bullying, social exclusion and lower wages. Why are so few of us open about our autism? Why do we mask? Why do we advise newcomers to be careful who they tell? Because deficit language has conditioned society to believe we are less than normal, a risk factor, a millstone around their necks. Deficit terms hold every autistic back from achieving their potential and lead us to live in fear of being exposed.

    If neutral language were used that does not suggest us being lesser than other people, it would place no barriers before those who need higher levels of assistance. Support should always be determined by individual need, not by an arbitrary label. If we avoid deficit language we encourage the world to presume competence, but do not detract from the fact that some of us need significant support where that competence is compromised. That is true of everyone, autistic or not.
    When we add intellectual disabilities, PTSD and/or other complications into the mix, the sensitive autistic mind can find it even harder to cope than those not on the spectrum, however the problem is not our autism, it is the lack of available support for our individual needs. Again, that affects everyone, not just autistics. Whether it be government cuts, insurance red tape or simple lack of provision, support for those who need it, irrespective of neural structure, is severely lacking in most countries.

    As an unmasked autistic I have spent the last 2 years proving my competence to people I have known for over a decade - competence that was never questioned before my autism was revealed. I went from being an eccentric but respected expert, to a poor, disabled, feeble minded charity case in many of their minds, just because of the preconceptions inherent in the common view of my "disorder".
    I've had to fight against unnecessary support being forced on me because the deficit model suggested that people like me needed it. Support that amounted to little more than further segregation and infantilisation. All I require is some sensory accommodations, clear instructions and honesty from people, not hand holding, constant supervision, extra checks on my work and step by miniscule step guidance in everything I do.
    The presumptions that go along with the label of "disorder" harm each and every one of us, whether we need extensive support or can manage independently.

    Drop the deficit language, presume competence and deliver appropriate help & support where it's needed and only where it's wanted. Being autistic should neither be a barrier nor a golden ticket to obtaining support, just a fact of life.
     
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  14. leehart

    leehart Active Member

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    This is true only to a point and this is where the challenge is. Autism is diverse and the above description only recognises what would once have been termed high functioning. It completely fails to recognise that there are also people with Autism unable to dress themselves, cook, cross a road safely, not wonder into a river or sea and drown....and I know this because that is my child.

    For me, likely Autistic, the above description works, but only to a point for it fails to recognise the needs of other Autistic people. Here in is the challenge of it all.

    Ps this is in reference only to how the world is set up and if it was set up ND all needs would be met. I'm utterly opposed to any cure ideology and agree entirely with your sentiments there :)
     
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  15. Streetwise

    Streetwise very cautious contributor V.I.P Member

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    but again you are confusing autism with :anxiety other health problems! autism isnt to other nt people the alarming health problems! like anxiety disorders ,thats the where we look so diffferent as nts presume nds love their everything and we can only !!! agree! with their !conclusion !as we !are not! threatening !enough !nts dont like mental illness or a mixture of illness ,oh the horror of not being neurotypical.

    how many people lets say reproduce !!!!!to purposefully have a child !!,not !just!to destress !.
     
  16. leehart

    leehart Active Member

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    I am not sure what you mean? I have not mentioned anxiety but vulnerabilities and how they are part of some peoples experience of Autism and this needs to be recognised and part of the narrative of defining Autistic experience.
     
  17. Sarah S

    Sarah S Well-Known Member

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    Whether we like it or not the pure simple fact is ASD /ADHD etc.... is infact and clearly stated by the medical faculty to be within the Neuropsycological diagnosis and as shuch also going under the term Disorders

    The biggest mistake many of us today or those generations prior to us was and still is trying to mask and hide our diagnosis and diffent problems.

    As then we are perceived as idiots or simply those with even worse diagnosis or severety levels. If we instead dared to actually stand up and accept and be open about them & acknowledge our diffent diagnosis people around you will possibly be more able and willing to accept youre diffent difficulties & even able to better understand us better.

    In my case despite what many in here always advice i have been 101 % open about ALL my diagnosis (incl Co morbid ) to ALL around me family /friends /aothorities/ medical faculty etc.... & i havent nor will i ever feel ashamed of any of them . And what it has given me in return is understanding ,acceptance & respect of all my flaws and how i funktion and how i dont etc...

    Shore ive been viewed as an idiot and so on by many in the past but as i grew older i said NO more. So i dont take any unjustifible crap from anyone any more and if someone feels im an idiot due to my diagnosis then thats their problems not mien an we just dont have any more contact any more
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2019 at 7:55 AM
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  18. Autistamatic

    Autistamatic He's just this guy, you know? V.I.P Member

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    It's not so long ago that homosexuality was listed in the manuals as a psychological disorder too, but we now know how barbaric and wrong it was to do so.

    Times move on, knowledge expands and things are reclassified as civilisation evolves towards greater understanding.
     
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  19. Sarah S

    Sarah S Well-Known Member

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    True that but as you also know its recently that they changed Autism and all the rest of the previos separate diagnosis to ASD. Same with re evaluating what ADHD is actually and prior to this as i have stated before Minimal brain damage got revaluated and rediagnoced to whats today is ADHD back in the end of the 70 ´s

    BUT the simple fact is it dont matter what we choose to call our diagnosis as we DO have them & our diffent tics & or co morbid diagnosis and until the medical faculty find out otherwise we will still be viewed as said current stated diagnose. Right or wrong whether it be old fashion believes or based on the laitest Discoverys within this field. In the eyes and opinions of the non diagnosed. & they will go from what they have learnt about what to expect from someone with this diagnose. The name dont mean anything in this matter.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2019 at 8:08 AM
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  20. Autistamatic

    Autistamatic He's just this guy, you know? V.I.P Member

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    @Sarah S
    You've just summed up very well why thousands of us all over the world are putting in the hours to educate, to conduct our own research and to change the minds of those who stand in judgement of us.

    The name means everything. Anything with "disorder" in the name creates the impression of fault and deficit. That's why many horrible words to describe tangible impairments have been retired and are now regarded as hate speech. We've a long way to go yet, but changing the language used will be a significant step.

    The current understanding of autism is highly flawed. When we were separated it was easy to dictate to us and be cast aside as dysfunctional, but then came the Internet and we started to talk. We realised we weren't the damaged freaks we'd been led to believe, we had plenty of things in common. Plenty of those commonalities aren't in the diagnostic manuals, and many of the things that are included are not well understood by those who don't experience them first hand.
    Time and perseverance will change the way we are seen.
     
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