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Any fellow Linux users on here?

Shevek

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Maybe they've changed the links around or something, here is another, click the green button "Download Latest Version MX-21.3_February_x64.iso (2.0 GB)"

MX-Linux - Browse /Final at SourceForge.net

For USB installers, it looks like Etcher is the gold standard right now on all platforms:

balenaEtcher - Flash OS images to SD cards & USB drives

When I first switched to Linux from Windows, I used YUMI on Windows, but I've only ever used dd on Linux since.
I'm in the middle of that 2 GB download, which seems more promising than the 150 KB torrent. Thanks.
 

Gerontius

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I had to start figuring out how to do the command line stuff on Linux. It is pretty fun but I think I'd have to keep a notebook of codes & stuff instead of trusting to remember it. Feels very hacker-ish and cool, and the text-only interface is genuinely fun to watch at work.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I had to start figuring out how to do the command line stuff on Linux. It is pretty fun but I think I'd have to keep a notebook of codes & stuff instead of trusting to remember it. Feels very hacker-ish and cool, and the text-only interface is genuinely fun to watch at work.
Using the terminal does come in handy on occasion. Super-User Do! :cool:
 

Gerontius

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Using the terminal does come in handy on occasion. :cool:
I ran a sort of anti-virus thing trying to see how that worked, and I don't think I got it to work correctly but it was genuinely fun trying it out and watching it all come up in print. I forget the name of it.
Feels like trying to run an '80s computer or something, instead of what I have (a 2016 Chromebook that a hacker turned into a pure Ubuntu machine. I think he pulled the limit screw out of the mother board or something; best cheap computer I've ever used. Beats the homemade laptop I did out of a really old iPad.)

I really love this new-fashioned Linux stuff because it's so much more fun than Windows and so much less of a proprietary crap festival than Mac.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I ran a sort of anti-virus thing trying to see how that worked, and I don't think I got it to work correctly but it was genuinely fun trying it out and watching it all come up in print. I forget the name of it.
Feels like trying to run an '80s computer or something, instead of what I have (a 2016 Chromebook that a hacker turned into a pure Ubuntu machine. I think he pulled the limit screw out of the mother board or something; best cheap computer I've ever used. Beats the homemade laptop I did out of a really old iPad.)

I really love this new-fashioned Linux stuff because it's so much more fun than Windows and so much less of a proprietary crap festival than Mac.
You mean Clam AV ? The trick is to first download Clam-Tk, which is basically a GUI for the rest of it. You definitely want to uncheck the box "Scan for PUAs" in the settings, otherwise it works in a too pedantic manner.

Beyond that you just scan all files in the the home directory. It does take a while to scan all those files, but unlike windows it doesn't take up much in the way of system resources.
 

Gerontius

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
You mean Clam AV ? The trick is to first download Clam-Tk, which is basically a GUI for the rest of it. You definitely want to uncheck the box "Scan for PUAs" in the settings, otherwise it works in a too pedantic manner.

Beyond that you just scan all files in the the home directory. It does take a while to scan all those files, but unlike windows it doesn't take up much in the way of system resources.
Awesome. And here I was thinking it was called something like <clamav> and wondering what's a Clamav. Reminded me of a root-word in Latin.
Sounds like a plan.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Awesome. And here I was thinking it was called something like <clamav> and wondering what's a Clamav. Reminded me of a root-word in Latin.
Sounds like a plan.
I think I should give you all the particulars. It involves a suite of programs and not any single program. Whether you download each component from either the terminal or your Linux repository probably doesn't matter.

Though all of this is pertinent to Ubuntu Linux Distros. I can't vouch for non-Ubuntu versions running clamav properly. It may simply come down to needing to find clamav instructions to whatever Linux OS you actually have.


Specific components to download:

clamav
clamav-base
clamav-daemon
clamav-docs
clamav-freshclam
clamdscan

And most of all, "clamtk". It organizes all the above components into a single graphic user interface named "Virus Scanner" which you will need to configure before launching.

Without using the clamtk GUI I could never get the actual clamav to run inside the terminal. My bad! Once all the programs are loaded, you should find clamtk in your menu and then just click the icon to configure it all.
 
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Gerontius

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I think I should give you all the particulars. It involves a suite of programs and not any single program. Whether you download each component from either the terminal or your Linux repository probably doesn't matter.

Specific components to download:

clamav
clamav-base
clamav-daemon
clamav-docs
clamav-freshclam
clamdscan

And most of all, "clamtk". It organizes all the above components into a single graphic user interface named "Virus Scanner" which you will need to configure before launching.
My goodness that is pretty cool.

I think my favorite part of the command line is being able to type a filename in and boom, there it is.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
My goodness that is pretty cool.

I think my favorite part of the command line is being able to type a filename in and boom, there it is.
I like having installed "neofetch", so now each time at the prompt when I type the name alone it brings up a synopsis of operating system and hardware particulars. Another fun toy for the command prompt.

 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I verified all the clamav components I have installed using the "Synaptic Package Manager". Another GUI-based program that shows every actual program that is formally installed on whatever version of Linux you're using. Makes it easy to verify whether you have all the components needed of something, or when you want to purge a program and eliminate all the components as opposed to just some of them.

You may already have it installed on your Linux OS if you're not already aware of it. Of course I have to warn people in that it is as powerful as the Windows Registry Editor. You remove or alter the wrong thing and you may bring it all down.

LOL...thank goodness for "Post-It Notes". I have most of my Linux "hacks" written down on them. Just some of the most critical ones I converted to actual text files for easy reference. I probably should convert them all. And with all those "sudo" commands, it's great to have so many documented, even if only on a Post-It Note.
 
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Shevek

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Maybe they've changed the links around or something, here is another, click the green button "Download Latest Version MX-21.3_February_x64.iso (2.0 GB)"

MX-Linux - Browse /Final at SourceForge.net

For USB installers, it looks like Etcher is the gold standard right now on all platforms:

balenaEtcher - Flash OS images to SD cards & USB drives

When I first switched to Linux from Windows, I used YUMI on Windows, but I've only ever used dd on Linux since.
OK, the .iso file looks available, and /home/bob/Downloads/balenaEtcher-1.7.9-ia32.AppImage is in too, but it does not open. looking around for something to open it, Gdebi package installer finally got some action, but only to select a drive and stop. I'm running Mint 17, but I have a Win 10 box available. The target machine is a barebone, brand new.
Hmm - maybe my mouse slipped. Now I'll try /home/bob/Downloads/balenaEtcher-1.18.4-x64.AppImage
 
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Angular Chap

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
OK, the .iso file looks available, and /home/bob/Downloads/balenaEtcher-1.7.9-ia32.AppImage is in too, but it does not open. looking around for something to open it, Gdebi package installer finally got some action, but only to select a drive and stop. I'm running Mint 17, but I have a Win 10 box available. The target machine is a barebone, brand new.
Hmm - maybe my mouse slipped. Now I'll try /home/bob/Downloads/balenaEtcher-1.18.4-x64.AppImage
Alright, if you have a Windows 10 box available, you could try Etcher on that if running it on Linux Mint 17 just won't work.
 

Jordy

Well-Known Member
I ran a sort of anti-virus thing trying to see how that worked, and I don't think I got it to work correctly but it was genuinely fun trying it out and watching it all come up in print. I forget the name of it.
Feels like trying to run an '80s computer or something, instead of what I have (a 2016 Chromebook that a hacker turned into a pure Ubuntu machine. I think he pulled the limit screw out of the mother board or something; best cheap computer I've ever used. Beats the homemade laptop I did out of a really old iPad.)

I really love this new-fashioned Linux stuff because it's so much more fun than Windows and so much less of a proprietary crap festival than Mac.
 

Angular Chap

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Well, I've just found my new favourite toy...

cowsaythanks.png
 

Gerontius

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
That's weird but cool, in the best possible ways.
I bet you that one of those cheap old televisions, the little 5" black-and-white jobs that they used to sell for about $40 brand new, would be a viable way to build a miniature CRT monitor. Put an amber gel or something over the screen, or paint it with a translucent green paint perhaps--and see what happens. It'd be pretty interesting as well to put it into a 3d-printed case that doesn't look like a television.

They were pretty lousy but one of these was also the first, last, and only TV that I actually owned. Used it for the weather forecasts when I was a kid. Weather is fun.

It was also the source of a hilariously weird childhood memory when I walked into the other room at night and found my dad sitting up, wide awake, watching Dora the Explorer on it. We made eye contact for an uneasy moment and I turned around and went back to bed.

 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
That's weird but cool, in the best possible ways.
I bet you that one of those cheap old televisions, the little 5" black-and-white jobs that they used to sell for about $40 brand new, would be a viable way to build a miniature CRT monitor. Put an amber gel or something over the screen, or paint it with a translucent green paint perhaps--and see what happens. It'd be pretty interesting as well to put it into a 3d-printed case that doesn't look like a television.

They were pretty lousy but one of these was also the first, last, and only TV that I actually owned. Used it for the weather forecasts when I was a kid. Weather is fun.

It was also the source of a hilariously weird childhood memory when I walked into the other room at night and found my dad sitting up, wide awake, watching Dora the Explorer on it. We made eye contact for an uneasy moment and I turned around and went back to bed.

I still have a nine-inch Sony color tv. Never thought about using it as a monitor though...lol. Then again those early Macs had a tiny screen too.

I still recall how I loved my cousin's family's five inch Sony b/w tv. I'd put it on the bed sideways and lie down to watch "Lost In Space". Corny, but nice memory. ;)
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
cool-retro-term lives up to its name. If you set the profile to "Futuristic", it even goes translucent.
LOL. Reminds me of the black light I used to have. Finally tossed it out before moving to Nevada.

How's that for "retro" ? :D
 

Shevek

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Alright, if you have a Windows 10 box available, you could try Etcher on that if running it on Linux Mint 17 just won't work.
On Mint 17, the 64 bit version just closed the whole file viewer opened one way, and went back to selecting a drive and nothing else when opened the other way. Maybe I just don't know what command I'm looking for, but I sure don't see anything about "bootable." On Win 10, it just offers to look for something in the MS store that might open it. Does "appimage" mean it is still compressed?
It is taking a long time for my gumption tank to re-fill on this job.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
On Mint 17, the 64 bit version just closed the whole file viewer opened one way, and went back to selecting a drive and nothing else when opened the other way. Maybe I just don't know what command I'm looking for, but I sure don't see anything about "bootable." On Win 10, it just offers to look for something in the MS store that might open it. Does "appimage" mean it is still compressed?
It is taking a long time for my gumption tank to re-fill on this job.
If you're looking for Balena-Etcher for Windows, don't bother with Microsoft's "store". Assuming of course you have another computer or drive running the Windows OS. While you make the bootable .iso drive in Windows using Balena-Etcher, you don't use Windows to actually install a Linux distro.

Download the executable from here: Download balenaEtcher - MajorGeeks


Too bad you don't have a more current version of Mint. It's "USB Image Writer" is much easier IMO than using Balena Etcher to make a bootable .iso flash drive. Built into the OS by default.
 
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