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Any fellow Linux users on here?

musicallessness

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
You might also consider Linux Mint Xfce, their leanest version. Though I prefer their Cinnamon edition myself.
Yeah but even with the older laptops this have at least 4tb of ram so I could find a full run mint with all frills and thrills
 

Angular Chap

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Oh btw it's funny to boot a library system with a USB stick loaded with Linux. Haha shhh just do it quickly when no one is watching haha I'm bad.
Haha, careful now, you don't want people screaming "HACKER!!!!" and causing a scene!

Oh I'm a philanthropist tech support I don't advertise it though because well why should I give away free advice,..? Haha I don't mind but these normies are evil and only take advantage although times are changing
Yup, been there myself many times, and now it's too late to go back! I've been asked to fix TVs, radios, fake fitness monitors, the LEDs in a bathroom mirror, vacuum cleaners, washing machines, and even door hinges. Of course, I always did, otherwise some lovely old lady would end up paying money she could barely afford to some unscrupulous clowns.

You might also consider Linux Mint Xfce, their leanest version.
Thanks for setting a good, sensible example by recommending Mint to people! Thanks for counteracting my masochistic ways here!
 

musicallessness

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Haha, careful now, you don't want people screaming "HACKER!!!!" and causing a scene!


Yup, been there myself many times, and now it's too late to go back! I've been asked to fix TVs, radios, fake fitness monitors, the LEDs in a bathroom mirror, vacuum cleaners, washing machines, and even door hinges. Of course, I always did, otherwise some lovely old lady would end up paying money she could barely afford to some unscrupulous clowns.


Thanks for setting a good, sensible example by recommending Mint to people! Thanks for counteracting my masochistic ways here!
Ha thats a white hat hacker but we hats aren't really hackers.

Yw welcome masochist ha
 

tkcartoonist

Tunes and Toons
I've been running into some issues since some updates. I wonder if someone could help. Whenever I check for updates, I run into this:

Code:
W: Conflicting distribution: http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu jammy-security InRelease (expected jammy-security but got jammy)
E: Failed to fetch http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/jammy-security/multiverse/dep11/icons-48x48.tar  404  Not Found [IP: 185.125.190.36 80]
E: Some index files failed to download. They have been ignored, or old ones used instead.

From what I've looked up, the fix may involve changing a repository address, but let me know what I can try.
 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
Code:
W: Conflicting distribution: http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu jammy-security InRelease (expected jammy-security but got jammy)
E: Failed to fetch http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/jammy-security/multiverse/dep11/icons-48x48.tar  404  Not Found [IP: 185.125.190.36 80]
E: Some index files failed to download. They have been ignored, or old ones used instead.
Sounds like either wrong repository or too many repositories. Did you add more repositories? It appears that all you missed out on was a few icons though. A simple reset to defaults should fix the problem:

 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I finally updated this drive to Linux Mint 21.0 doing a full .iso installation from scratch. Aloha Mint 20.3.

Already tested the update to Linux Mint 21.1 on another drive and it went flawlessly, so I'll be updating this drive accordingly.

What's so good about Mint 21 versus 20.3? Improved, but most importantly it's a long-term support version. Meaning five years of support. In your face, Microsoft....:cool:
 

musicallessness

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I finally updated this drive to Linux Mint 21.0 doing a full .iso installation from scratch. Aloha Mint 20.3.

Already tested the update to Linux Mint 21.1 on another drive and it went flawlessly, so I'll be updating this drive accordingly.

What's so good about Mint 21 versus 20.3? Improved, but most importantly it's a long-term support version. Meaning five years of support. In your face, Microsoft....:cool:
Wait?! Did I miss something, when did micro$haft winblows ever offer support?
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
One thing that continues to irk me about Linux is how pedantic it can be in terms of logging unimportant happenings especially on bootup. Like the fact that Pulse Audio Volume Control cannot interact with Bluetooth. So it spits out a lengthy explanation in a log file, along with other non-critical concerns that in reality are not concerns at all. I eventually found a fix that eliminates the issue entirely. No harm, no foul given I don't use Bluetooth technology at all.

The good news is that over time and updated versions of Linux Mint (20.3 to 21.0) I have been able to eliminate these messages one-by-one by posting them verbatim into search engines. With a little time and patience I've been able to find the right solution in terms of either making them invisible in the bootup process or even better, to stop them from being posted in the log file. All those pieces of text add up unless you routinely purge them using apps like "Stacer" to eliminate all that unnecessary recording of benign issues that the OS does automatically.

The only things now being logged are the last two mysteries to solve. Eventually I may find the right solution to make them go away, unless they involve BIOS settings I choose not to alter. From what I have googled, they appear to be "bios bugs". Non-critical, but annoying to see them systematically show up in log files. Yet given the age of my computer's motherboard, it's impractical to consider updating my BIOS. In any event I have made them invisible on bootup by simply adding "loglevel=3" in my GRUB file.

1) gkr-pam: unable to locate daemon control file

2) ACPI Error: Aborting method \ _SB.PCI0.SATO._GTF due to previous error (AE_NOT_FOUND) (20210730/psparse-529)

Presently I'm mulling over this link as a possible fix to stop item#2 from being perpetually logged. Which would be nice given this repeats itself no less than eight times in both bootup and in being recorded as an entry to the log file. Of course in adding "loglevel=3" to my GRUB file, at least it no longer shows on bootup. Making booting Linux Mint 21.0 no more than ten seconds after the BIOS information comes and goes onscreen.

Where I need to make yet another addition to the default command line of my GRUB file:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="libata.noacpi=1"

Providing of course that I found the right answer: ACPI BIOS ERROR (BUG): Could not resolve symbol [\_SB.PCIO.SATO.PRTO._GTF.DSSP] AE_NOT_FOUND (20190816/psargs-330)

Still, I'm thrilled that my perserverance has paid off over time. Having gotten these benign log entries down to a mere two items. The bad news? If you really want to tweak your Linux Distro to near-perfection, these are the sort of things you have to get your feet wet over. The good news? It's usually just a matter of using search engines to find the answers. That unlike Microsoft Windows, you really can have virtually everything your way if you really want it. Though the older your computer may be, the more likely you may have to deal with such things.

Do you absolutely have to do this sort of thing? LOL....hellno. But if you have OCD, expect yourself to do something about it until you have everything "just so". In essence, this is far more about ME than Linux. Still, for me the effort is worth it in making a ten-year old computer run like a fine, well-oiled machine. With Micro$oft completely out of the picture. ;)
 
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Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Where I need to make yet another addition to the default command line of my GRUB file:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet libata.noacpi=1 loglevel=3 splash"
It worked on both Mint 21.0 (Vanessa) and 21.1 (Vera). Leaving only a single entry on my log file to figure out how to purge: gkr-pam: unable to locate daemon control file

Hot damn...it's taken months to figure out how to eliminate this from my log file and system boot. :cool:
 
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tkcartoonist

Tunes and Toons
Just for fun, I found a program that runs Tetris in the terminal.

LinuxTetris.png
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
One thing I'm beginning to now ponder is to build a new computer after all. Not for Windows 11, but for a Linux Distro.

Mostly out of curiousity. It makes me think, "Wow if this how Linux Mint 21.0/21.1 runs on this ten-year old system, imagine how it must run on something built to current hardware specs? :cool:
 
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Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
The new 13th generation processors are out so you can get fairly good deals at the moment on 12th generation.

Choose a processor first, and check it's stats to see what speed of ram it requires, they must match. Then choose a motherboard that is compatible with both.

Also check the power requirements of the motherboard, most of them require 450 watts as a bare minimum, if you're going to throw in a couple of extra drives and use a lot of USBs I recommend at least 650 watts.

The newer NVMe solid state drives are really quick, boot up in less than 3 seconds.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
The new 13th generation processors are out so you can get fairly good deals at the moment on 12th generation.

Choose a processor first, and check it's stats to see what speed of ram it requires, they must match. Then choose a motherboard that is compatible with both.

Also check the power requirements of the motherboard, most of them require 450 watts as a bare minimum, if you're going to throw in a couple of extra drives and use a lot of USBs I recommend at least 650 watts.

The newer NVMe solid state drives are really quick, boot up in less than 3 seconds.
I'd prefer a 13th gen Intel i5 CPU. A lot of good reviews about them. Though I wouldn't be much interested in an uber-powerful GPU either. The 4 series Nvidia cards are getting trashed in the media at the moment. I think a 3060Ti would be as far as I would consider along with a Gen 4 PCIe. But yeah, no way I'd seek a power supply less than 650 watts, which I run on this computer with only an Nvidia 1660Ti GPU. Lots of USB ports? Always.

Still a bit frustrated with the driver issue in using Nvidia GPUs. I tried the latest open source version on this system and it locked it up. Went back to using the oldest proprietary driver for stability.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I just successfully upgraded from Linux Mint 21.0 to 21.1 without any issues. Some nice new features. Seems all the reviews of this upgrade are quite positive. (My past experiences with Linux upgrades haven't been quite so smooth.)

Wine 7.0.1 has just been upgraded to Wine 8 if anyone is interested. (Wine Is Not an Emulator)

That seemed to go ok as well. That's one upgrade that always makes me nervous....thinking that at some point my ability to use a 32-bit 25-year old version of Photoshop or other Windows programs might some day come to an end. Though every time I use Photoshop in Linux I get a chuckle out of it, given that while it works in Windows 10, it's buggy to the point of sometimes crashing. Something that has never happened in Linux Mint.

I use winecfg executed in the terminal to make the executable of Photoshop correspond to Windows XP format.
 
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phantom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Though every time I use Photoshop in Linux I get a chuckle out of it, given that while it works in Windows 10, it's buggy to the point of sometimes crashing. Something that has never happened in Linux Mint.

I use winecfg executed in the terminal to make the executable of Photoshop correspond to Windows XP format.
It gets even funnier when you realize that linux with wine has better backwards compatibility with old windows binaries than linux has with its own binaries. The reason for this is that the linux has a rolling release ecosystem, binaries are written to be compatible with whatever happens to be the latest and most commonly present user land, and the user land is in constant gradual change. Since the user land doesn't have major versions its almost impossible to provide backwards compatibility.
 
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Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Major disappointment. Just had my first glitch happen with Photoshop 5.5 using Wine 8.0.

In applying the "fade" feature to a filter, when I used the slider rather than type in a percentage to lower the impact of a sharpening filter, it caused Photoshop to crash. Similar to how it can happen with Windows 10.

Not the end of the world, but it makes me sad. Still, at least it doesn't crash when I need to do elaborate marquees around objects that take up a lot of screen real estate. Something that made using Photoshop in Windows 7 & 10 a real pain in comparison. I'd hate to think that future revisions with Wine will eventually ruin my ability to use such an old but otherwise reliable program in a modern operating system.

At least I can still use the filter fade function, but I just have to remember to state a percentage of fade as a text integer rather than use that blasted slider control.

Using a current, full version of Photoshop is IMO now "highway robbery" by Adobe, who charges hundreds of dollars a year rather than a one-time sale of the software as they used to do. Not really an option for me on general priniciple. In the meantime I'm still struggling to learn a Linux version of Gimp 2.10. The most popular freeware substitute for Photoshop.
 
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Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
I'd hate to think that future revisions with Wine will eventually ruin my ability to use such an old but otherwise reliable program in a modern operating system.
I hope you get a few more years out of it yet but eventually all things succumb to evolution.

Have you had a play around with Gimp? That has changed over the last few years too and I wish we could still run the older versions, but such is life.

For quick easy editing designed specifically for editing photos for web use I really like Real Draw. That runs perfectly under wine.
 

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