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Featured To mask or to embrace your autism...

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by Aspie_With_Attitude, Sep 12, 2019.

  1. Misery

    Misery Photo-Negative V.I.P Member

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    It's possible that they may tell you to put it in a ponytail if it's long enough. For whatever reason that is normal or acceptable or some nonsense. I dont claim to understand their excuse for logic.

    I have really long hair myself, it'd irritate the heck outta me to no end if I had to do that.
     
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  2. Progster

    Progster Gone sideways to the sun V.I.P Member

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    I have no choice. I'm a language teacher and I suspect that if my students/parents of students knew I was on the spectrum, or acted in a strange way, they would cancel their lessons. And I need to lessons to survive financially. So I have to tread carefully around the parents in particular. There's also a lot of ignorance, and people judge. So telling people is not an option. I can be a bit more 'natural' with the younger students, but never the parents. There are some jobs where it might be ok, and other jobs where it's not possible.
     
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  3. Rectify

    Rectify Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I think if you find the right opportunity @Joshua Aaron you will be fine. The employer will look at your skills and your fit for the job instead of the other stuff - hair or autism. I think what @Misery was talking about is that those kind of employers are not in the majority. Many autistics feel they do have to mask to get, and keep, a job. I hope you are one who finds the right position because as we've heard from many people - many of us aren't working, though we'd like to, and many of us are masking with difficult long term consequences.
     
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  4. Tony Ramirez

    Tony Ramirez Christian with Asperger's Syndrome

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    I mask when I am out socializing but at home I go all out hiding nothing.

    It does make me very tired masking though the worst small talk and many times I slip with Asperger's traits but the people I hang out with don't care much or said anything.
     
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  5. Aidan49

    Aidan49 Well-Known Member

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    I don't mask my autism, yet I don't embrace it. I'm not defined by it, yet I don't hide from it.

    I think the main thing that's prevented me from embracing my aspergers is that a feeling that if I do that than any chance of a meaningful relationship with a woman will be gone. Of course I'm probably wrong about this, but that's the way I feel.

    Like I'll be known not as a person, but as someone with aspergers. And that kind of person isn't seen as attractive, but rather someone to be pitied.

    Though as I wrote in another thread, I don't think I'll ever be ready for a relationship. So maybe I should fully embrace my disability.
     
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  6. Fade2black

    Fade2black Well-Known Member

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    I generally embrace my uniqueness but being in my 50's and highly educated, skilled and with high-level certifications, I can't seem to find a job for the reason, I haven't been able to change with the political madness of 'you can say that but you can't say that' and the tone in which things have to be said. Fake people everywhere, where did the real people go?
     
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  7. Aeolienne

    Aeolienne Well-Known Member

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    (Not written by me)

    ‘With Asperger’s you put on a mask to pretend you’re normal’: Daniel Lightwing on how the film of his life helps take the stigma out of autism

    Londoner Daniel Lightwing was an outsider at school but maths helped him find a job at Google — and love. He talks with Susannah Butter about the film of his life

    Susannah Butter 19 March 2015

    In any conversation about the modern workplace Google is held up as the ideal. But when Daniel Lightwing worked there as a web developer he was not happy. “I have a problem with office culture,” says the 26-year-old, who was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome — now simply known as an autistic spectrum disorder — marked by difficulties with social interaction and non-verbal communication. “I ate lunch by myself to avoid people talking about things that were not work-related. The more I did stuff like that the more people rejected me.” School was worse. “I didn’t go to lunch because I wouldn’t know where to sit or what to say, so I didn’t eat. I was really skinny and when my dad found out he was furious.”

    Lightwing’s feelings are expressed in the new film X+Y, which is based on his story. Director Morgan Matthews had the idea when he met Lightwing filming 2007 BBC documentary Beautiful Young Minds, about the International Maths Olympiad (IMO).

    X+Y’s protagonist, Nathan Ellis (Asa Butterfield), is lonely and bullied at school. His life changes when he is chosen to represent Great Britain at the IMO in China where he falls in love with a girl who helps him connect with society, and his mother.

    “I cried the first three times I watched it. It says things I was feeling but could not express,” says Lightwing. He speaks softly, making eye contact occasionally before looking back down at his bitten fingernails. His maths workings on a sheet of paper appear in the film. “My cameo,” he smiles.

    As in X+Y, he fell in love with a Chinese girl and married her. Yan Zhu has a stake in the film but they are no longer together. “She ran away back to China one day when I was working at Google and I never saw her again. I don’t have a positive impression of her now, what she did was cruel.” He stops. Talking about it hurts his current girlfriend’s feelings.

    “I live with my new girlfriend, which is why it is awkward.” She is also Chinese. They met “at a Chinese gathering” and live in Baker Street.

    He orders a hot chocolate, admitting: “I find drink orders awkward. In social situations I’m often thinking about what is going on in that person’s mind. It’s like my brain is overheating.”

    Lightwing was not diagnosed with Asperger’s until he was 16. He grew up in York, the oldest of six children. “I didn’t have a brilliant childhood. There was an emphasis on being social at school and my parents wanted me to be normal.”

    In X+Y, Nathan’s father dies when he is a child — Lightwing’s real-life father, who is very much alive, has taken it with good humour. “My Dad was frustrated with me when I was young because he is a GP and his job is about empathising with people. He said: ‘Even if you are not interested you should show that you are. That’s the most important skill in life’. For me that is like teaching university maths to a little child.”

    Today Lightwing can understand his father’s pain but says “as a child he would ask me to do something simple like buy something from the shop for him and I would panic. I know how to ask but if they say something I don’t expect, what do I say next?”

    His mother, a science teacher, began to research Asperger’s after reading The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time and took him to a specialist. “Being diagnosed meant I didn’t feel I had to try and change. You just have different strengths.”

    Competitive maths and a teacher spotting his potential also helped. “Everything got better after the competition. I felt more self-respect and part of a community — there were people like me I could relate to better than those in my school and family.”

    He read maths at Trinity College, Cambridge, which was “much easier than school, socially. I didn’t feel bullied and was free. One problem was that I lost interest in maths a bit.”

    After his degree he lived in China, where “they are more respectful to academically talented people”, and would have stayed had Google not offered him a job “building cool things to make people think Google is good” — such as developing the 3D museum viewer for company’s Art Project.

    Were there others at Google with Asperger’s? “Of course. Asperger’s is more common than you think. There are definitely politicians with it.”

    He describes his disorder as “an extremely different kind of personality. I wouldn’t call it a disability. When you have Asperger’s you are putting on a mask and trying to pretend you are normal but what you are thinking is not normal.

    “People with autism have polarised emotions. If it gets too much you withdraw from everything. It is called social hangover. There were times at school where I was overloaded. I’d try to run away. If I couldn’t escape I would explode.”

    His social struggle at Google and school did not come through a lack of willing. “Sometimes I do want to join in with other people but I’m too shy. Sometimes, though, I don’t know what to say when it is not work-related.” Google eventually “became boring”. Now he uses his programming skills in financial arbitrage and betting but becomes evasive when I ask him about it. Does he work to make it better? “It is less ethical than that. I am part of a betting syndicate. It’s secret.”

    This job suits him because, “In many companies the only way to make money is to rise in the management. I don’t have the ability to do that.”

    How should we treat those with Asperger’s? “There is too much emphasis on changing people or helping them fit in.” When he was younger, he admits he was violent, biting or kicking his peers and teachers. “That violence should not be punished because generally we are having strong emotions and there is nothing you can do about it. More should be done to avoid these situations. You can’t treat autistic children as though they’re doing something that’s unreasonable because to them it isn’t.”

    Medication isn’t a solution. “There was a phase where people thought Asperger’s needed to be cured but people with such a focus on systems and patterns probably came up with most inventions in history.”

    Alcohol helps: “I stop thinking and can say what I want.” When he wants to “act normal” he thinks about “if I have been in a similar situation before and know what to say or how I should act.”

    If he could wake up one morning and not have Asperger’s, would he want to? “No. I would feel really sad. I might not be good at what I enjoy.” When he is older he would like to have children. “If they had Asperger’s I’d know what to do. I don’t think I’d mind either way, it is just a different way of seeing the world, but I’d want to diagnose it early. It’s not nice going through 15 years of prison.”

    The maths competition crew still meet up to play poker. Lightwing is happiest doing “computer things and China things”. Going out is, “OK. I used to be afraid but now I have friends who are not Asperger’s and I’m able to.”

    X+Y is a milestone because, he says, “it is about how there are lots of different kinds of people, how they are valuable, can do great things and be part of society. It shows Asperger’s in a good light but there are comedy elements that make it a film for everyone to enjoy.”

    Source: Evening Standard
     
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  8. tree

    tree Blue/Green Staff Member V.I.P Member

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    Actually, I get really tired of hearing about masks being unique to ASD.
    Surely other neurologies attempt inauthentic behavior for the sake of
    not standing out as different.
     
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  9. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Good point. There are likely many circumstances and reasons for people masking their behavior given the variety of oppression society may have in store for much of anyone who "stands out in the crowd".

    Speaks poorly for us as a species, but there you have it. :oops:
     
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  10. Aspychata

    Aspychata My Art Work

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    Identified with the polarized emotions and if overwhelmed, you withdraw from everything. I pushed people away when l was completely bombbarded. Now, I have worked on that part and l choose not to withdraw. Thank you for posting this article.
     
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  11. Pats

    Pats Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I don't agree with this part of the article. Maybe the child shouldn't be punished in the typical way, but they can't be permitted to continue hurting others physically just because it's reasonable to them. Even some child molesters don't see what they do as wrong, but it has to be stopped. I don't think any label, including autism, should be an excuse for the mistreatment of others. Everyone needs to be taught respect toward others.
     
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  12. Fino

    Fino Alex V.I.P Member

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    I agree very much. What a ridiculous and dangerous idea. The child should be taught that violence is not an appropriate or acceptable outlet for his "strong emotions." Otherwise the same could be said for any child experiencing extreme emotions. :eek:
     
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  13. Autistamatic

    Autistamatic He's just this guy, you know? V.I.P Member

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    Quite. Masking is talked about frequently in ADHD circles in particular. Dyslexic, dyspraxic and discalculaic people have often sophisticated strategies for disguising their limitations.

    Whilst it's fair to say that a mask is very different and far more draining than the various faces people wear in everyday life, to suggest that masking is unique to autistic people is naïve at the least.
     
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  14. Autistamatic

    Autistamatic He's just this guy, you know? V.I.P Member

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    I've read through this twice now and it's uncomfortable reading. It comes across (to me at least) as one person's perception and assumptions about their own experience of autism being generalised as the experience of us all. Whilst there are definitely elements I recognise in there, there are others which I do not and which would raise the hackles of a great deal of the autistic people I am in regular contact with.

    I can only hope that the filmmaker has done far more research in order to provide a more representative view of autism in general.
     
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  15. Kalinychta

    Kalinychta Well-Known Member

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    The U.S. title is A Brilliant Young Mind.
     
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  16. WildCat

    WildCat and his scatterbrain V.I.P Member

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    As do plenty of other people. It's not hard to figure out once you've paid enough attention.
     
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  17. Aspychata

    Aspychata My Art Work

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    Believe this to be a very sensitive subject to our community, and any documentary will never truly please any of us completely due to who we are, and the topic. It's a no win win.

    Our ability to step outside of ourselves to see a different perspective is actually a major stumbling block for at least 50 percent of us, and l am aiming low. I have absorbed this tibit from the backstories l repeatly read here everyday.
     
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  18. Trophonius

    Trophonius Active Member

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    Not necessarily neurologies.

    I think is something to be found in everyone. Social behavior often implies to make changes in the individual expression in order to avoid conflicts.

    This "mask" is in fact, a full collection of mask which need to be changed according to the situation the individual is in. And people do this frequently, and often mindlessly.

    I think the characteristic of ASD is not to be found as much in having to "put on a mask" as in not being able to capture enough information to determine which is the appropriate mask to wear in each situation. Also, people who are not in the spectrum may feel less stressed or overwhelmed about having to "wear" and "change masks" during the day.
     
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  19. Aspychata

    Aspychata My Art Work

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    So the recent posts have brought me back to the thought provoking loop of the subject of masking.

    I remember telling someone, l would never say that because when l am out, l have my public persona (mask) and l am very appro. Until l came to this site, l wasn't aware of that not being normal. I assume automatically that everyone masks to some extent, even NT's mask.

    Don't NT's mask slightly? Who is really *on* 100% of the time? Does being on the spectrum mean it's more of a effort to mask? Masking to me means not saying totally Beavis & Butt head comments, masking means having a pc filter. But this has taken some work.

    What is your mask? Your persona? What do you overcome?
     
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  20. SusanLR

    SusanLR Well-Known Member

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    Main mask is to smile and respond in a friendly manner when someone in public talks to me.
    Second most important mask is to not let anxiety show even if I'm having an internal panic attack.
     
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