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The Complete Guide to Asperger's Syndrome 2014-02-10

Asperger's Syndrome

  1. Vanilla

    Vanilla Your friendly neighbourhood hedgehog V.I.P Member

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    Vanilla submitted a new resource:

    The Complete Guide to Asperger's Syndrome, by Tony Attwood - Asperger's Syndrome

    Read more about this resource...
     
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  2. icesyckel

    icesyckel Well-Known Member

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    Just FYI, I have the Kindle version, and it is very useful to have it in that format due to the highlighting options and features allowing you to see where others have highlighted/quoted him.
     
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  3. Cerulean

    Cerulean Well-Known Member

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    I have and would recommend this book, although as a woman I found Aspergirls to be almost equally useful, and waaaaay shorter.
     
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  4. icesyckel

    icesyckel Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, Attwood's book is quite long. He writes well, but I suppose you could skim the sections that apply less to your situation since he uses good headers to separate sections.

    Still, it is good that there is a shorter alternative out there for women.
     
  5. James K Trefethen

    James K Trefethen Active Member

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    I read this book. Then I decided that I probably had autism. And (of course) I do.
     
  6. psychotopsy

    psychotopsy Active Member

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    I have pretty much read the parts that I was interested in(so almost all of the book) and I must say, it was extremely useful. It really helped me figure myself out. I would recommend it. Even though it is not exactly short, it's easy to read and well-written.
     
  7. ifiwerewrongidknowit

    ifiwerewrongidknowit Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Excellent book!
    In fact it was the first book I have ever read about Asperger's Syndrome.
    It's not a short book, but I didn't mind. I enjoyed every word of it.
    It's also very easy to understand, even for someone like me, who is not a brain-surgeon. :D
    Although it was scary sometimes, because I felt he wrote the book about me. Especially when he described the adolescent years...
     
  8. Silverwhistle

    Silverwhistle Member

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    Yes: this book was a catalyst for me. I chanced upon a copy in a charity shop while I was staying with my Dad in 2013, and started glancing through it. I'd already taken the ASQ test, and was curious to learn more/pursue diagnosis. It appeared at the right time in my life. On the bus back to Hull from Beverley, I was reading bits, then pointing to them and passing it over to my Dad. He also read the book. So much fell into place... We were just sorry that it was just a few months after my mother's death: it would have made sense of so many of the problems in my relationship with her (I couldn't play the kind of daughter role she expected), and the fact her brother, too, was patently an (undiagnosed) autist...

    I then decided to go ahead with getting a formal diagnosis.