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Sanctimony, self-righteousness, and virtue signalling.

jogupo

Member
I think virtue signaling is likely to be repugnant to most people on the spectrum regardless of their ideology because it involves a thought process that is almost the opposite of ours. We rarely "jump on the bandwagon" if we feel something makes no logical sense. When I was a student senator in college for instance, I had no problem being the only Yes or No vote even if I knew in advance that would be the case. This is why many of us question (not fail to understand) rituals like weddings or funerals because they make no sense from a purely analytical standpoint.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I think virtue signaling is likely to be repugnant to most people on the spectrum regardless of their ideology because it involves a thought process that is almost the opposite of ours. We rarely "jump on the bandwagon" if we feel something makes no logical sense. When I was a student senator in college for instance, I had no problem being the only Yes or No vote even if I knew in advance that would be the case. This is why many of us question (not fail to understand) rituals like weddings or funerals because they make no sense from a purely analytical standpoint.
This is the traditional way of autistic thinking (analytical analysis).
However, I have encountered quite a few autistic people who defy their individualist nature and do jump on "the bandwagon" (groupthink).
Their reasoning power is usually poor, and their emotional needs are great, however, and that may explain some of this non-autistic behaviour.
 
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All-Rounder

uwu owo uwu
V.I.P Member
For example:
Some people choose not to make their charitable donations public. Others shout out their virtuousness and demand respect for their actions.
There is among psychologists a debate that true altruism does actually exist. Since no matter what you do, there is some gain, if you aim to be altruistic the aim itself is actually gonna define that you're pursuing that personal aim which has the purpose to improve you in some way and thus offer you gain.

You can be more or less selfish but you'll be selfish in some way anyway.
 

All-Rounder

uwu owo uwu
V.I.P Member
What freemasonry does for eg. is have rules that don't actually approach more a selfless thing, much like Autism Speaks, the fact that the money goes into the leadership instead of majoritary towards the causes and facilitating people getting personally involved with the cause. Like other cults it seems to me it's a way to gain from it, financially.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
There is among psychologists a debate that true altruism does actually exist. Since no matter what you do, there is some gain,
I reasoned this out in my 20's.
Altruists simply are satisfying their own emotional needs.
But as I have said before, I'd rather have a world full of altruists than psychopaths.
 

All-Rounder

uwu owo uwu
V.I.P Member
I think virtue signaling is likely to be repugnant to most people on the spectrum regardless of their ideology because it involves a thought process that is almost the opposite of ours. We rarely "jump on the bandwagon" if we feel something makes no logical sense. When I was a student senator in college for instance, I had no problem being the only Yes or No vote even if I knew in advance that would be the case. This is why many of us question (not fail to understand) rituals like weddings or funerals because they make no sense from a purely analytical standpoint.
There are quite a few of people on the spectrum, depending on the community the numbers might vary, but they are nonetheless emotional in thinking. I also think that humans usually have times when all have emotional thinking, spectrum or not.

I think for many weddings and funerals are mostly uncomfortable for being a social thing rather than logically sound. But not everyone tries to make sense of it in some way.

For eg. I still am minoritary in being a skeptic towards religion, I still am minoritary in being childfree by choice, I still am minoritary in not wanting to get married, I often see the opposite, incels trying hard to get married or get sexual experience. When they find out that sex is not a miracle cure to their emotional troubles but that it adds to them maybe they'll consider other things. But people are often blind or emotional and make a mistake over and over again. Maybe spectrum people are meant to be gullible by an increased percentage.

A lot of spectrum people get banned and that means that the variety of mischief and troubled human does not stop before the spectrum.
 
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tree

Blue/Green
Staff member
V.I.P Member


"Virtue signalling", according to the Cambridge Dictionary, is "an attempt to show other people that you are a good person, for example by expressing opinions that will be acceptable to them, especially on social media". The expression is often used to imply that the virtue being signalled is exaggerated or insincere.
 

nukefusion

Member


"Virtue signalling", according to the Cambridge Dictionary, is "an attempt to show other people that you are a good person, for example by expressing opinions that will be acceptable to them, especially on social media". The expression is often used to imply that the virtue being signalled is exaggerated or insincere.
Indeed and I think what I cannot stand about it is the insincerity. You can be sanctimonious and self-righteous but there's a possibilty that you might just be deluded. Virtue signalling implies some sort of calculated deception and for somebody that values honesty and straight-forwardness that really grates.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
"Virtue signalling", according to the Cambridge Dictionary, is "an attempt to show other people that you are a good person, for example by expressing opinions that will be acceptable to them, especially on social media". The expression is often used to imply that the virtue being signalled is exaggerated or insincere.
This indicates to me that a person's "locus of identity" is external rather than internal.

Ok. But external locus of identity ?​

It’s a concept of human behaviour where one’s actions and identity are shaped up by external factors. The person’s identity being controlled by others.

The person constantly looking for something to give shape to his ideas, in order to match others expectations and views.

So, essentially, people are trying to impress others and will do whatever it takes, often by misrepresenting others, and at the expense of their integrity and personal growth.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Virtue signalling implies some sort of calculated deception and for somebody that values honesty and straight-forwardness that really grates.
The problem with virtue-signalling is that it is usually found to be hypocritical.
Examples of "Do as I say but not as I do" is often the case with very little investigative effort.
There are numerous examples of this in regard to mask-wearing, as an example.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
There are quite a few of people on the spectrum, depending on the community the numbers might vary, but they are nonetheless emotional in thinking.
Studies have indicated that, overwhelmingly, most people (presumably, both ND & NT) make decisions based on emotional rather than rational needs. (Type 1 thinking).

However, decades ago, there were studies suggesting those on the spectrum tended to be more rational in their thinking than similar NT groups.
After all, at one time, we were described as "Little Professors" or "Vulcans".
Those descriptions fit me well, btw.
 

nukefusion

Member
If you have been victimised through sanctimony, you might find it more than "irritating".
Yes absolutely agree, I am lucky in that I have little time for people like that so I'm not exposed to them for long. It's tough if the people in question are family members.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Yes absolutely agree, I am lucky in that I have little time for people like that so I'm not exposed to them for long. It's tough if the people in question are family members.
Being on the spectrum, it was not surprising I was a very damaged individual throughout most of my life, being easy pickings for psychopaths, sociopaths, and simple garden variety sanctimonious narcissists.
It wasn't until relatively recently that I gained the ability to be more proactive than reactive.

Choosing to walk away from toxic people sounds simple, but it is often not the case for those who have been brainwashed into being social "punching bags" for the amusement of the "audience".

"I am Tosk" no longer.
I am no longer an unwilling member of "The Children of the Damned" community.
"Russian warship, The Truman Show audience, go 'F' yourself..."

As Nietzche said so concisely: "What does not kill me, makes me stronger."
While this may not be the case in all situations involving psychological abuse, it is applicable to many in most situations.
 

All-Rounder

uwu owo uwu
V.I.P Member
Studies have indicated that, overwhelmingly, most people (presumably, both ND & NT) make decisions based on emotional rather than rational needs. (Type 1 thinking).

However, decades ago, there were studies suggesting those on the spectrum tended to be more rational in their thinking than similar NT groups.
After all, at one time, we were described as "Little Professors" or "Vulcans".
Those descriptions fit me well, btw.
What are "Vulcans?"

"The god of volcanoes and fire

Proper noun. Vulcan. (Roman mythology) The god of volcanoes and fire, especially the forge, also the patron of all craftsmen, principally blacksmiths."


[Vulcan history is incredibly detailed. Following a long history of violence and war that nearly devastated their species, the Vulcans chose to follow the philosopher, Surak, by suppressing all emotion and embracing logic. The followers of Surak engaged in countless rituals and meditations to completely purge themselves of all emotion, as they saw it as the only way to prevent the extinction of the Vulcan race. Some Vulcans rejected Surak's teachings, though most of these detractors eventually left the planet Vulcan and became the Romulan Star Empire.

However, Vulcans are not only renowned for their strict adherence to logic, but also for their many almost supernatural abilities.
Vulcans don't fear death, they accept it as the logical and inevitable conclusion of life, but sometimes, before a Vulcan dies, they use a mind meld to transfer their life-essence into someone else's brain.] I want a dress like Surak.
hqdefault.jpg

Perhaps not Star Trek Vulcans xD [presumably elf emote]:smilingimp:
 
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Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
[Vulcan history is incredibly detailed. Following a long history of violence and war that nearly devastated their species, the Vulcans chose to follow the philosopher, Surak, by suppressing all emotion and embracing logic.
I was not influenced by Star Trek Vulcans in this. You have probably seen over the years my emphasis on emotional stability.
Valuing reason/logic has always been part of my psychological makeup, which isn't a surprise since I am on the spectrum, after all.
 

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