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Sanctimony, self-righteousness, and virtue signalling.

Darkkin

Lioness of Spoons
V.I.P Member
How do you view these qualities?

Red flag for potential problems (proceed with extreme caution and take any and all opinions from said source with a block of salt).

Basically keep contact to the absolute minimum and get away from them as quickly as humanly possible.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I'm a bad person and will often tear down a person who behaves these ways.
I think you are missing the point.
There is no defending sanctimony, self-righteousness and virtue-signalling. ;)

Presumably, you were being ironic?
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
sanctimony
/ˈsaŋ(k)tɪməni/

noun
  • 1. the action or practice of acting as if one were morally superior to other people: derogatory. Powered by Oxford Dictionaries.

  • Self-righteousness, also called sanctimoniousness, sententiousness and holier-than-thou attitudes is a feeling or display of (usually smug) moral superiority derived from a sense that one's beliefs, actions, or affiliations are of greater virtue than those of the average person.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-righteousness

 

Misery

Photo-Negative
V.I.P Member
I think you are missing the point.
There is no defending sanctimony, self-righteousness and virtue-signalling. ;)

Presumably, you were being ironic?

This depends on exactly how you look at it, though.

People often call out traits like this while not noticing how truly frequent and common they are. Even among members of this very forum, these traits present themselves fairly often. Whether or not others actually spot them when they appear, of course, is another matter.

Myself, for instance. I know I have some of the "view myself as having higher morals" sorts of traits. It's not even a question of "if"... that trait is there. However, this specifically was caused by too many years of being bullied and pushed around, and too many experiences of watching people act like total snotrags towards each other. It causes me to see the general public as... "slimy", at best. It's an automatic thing. And I usually dont try to hide it, either.

Yet, everyone on this forum, and generally most people wherever I go, seem to get along with me just fine.

These traits dont inherently make someone into some sort of mustache-twirling villain.

After all, EVERYONE has flaws, whether they want to admit it or not. The important part is this question: Do they make up for those flaws by having POSITIVE traits and performing positive actions? That's what matters.
 

Silhouette Mirage

Slimepunk's Not Dead!
V.I.P Member
Serious bullying (or attempting to harm others) aside,

I'll admit that I can come off as a bit narcissistic and self-righteous at times. When you're speaking from the heart, it's bound to happen occasionally. And therefore, I can't hold it against others for doing the same, or being flawed like I am. In fact, maybe it makes me respect and like them just a little more. Even if I don't personally agree or resonate with a single word they say.

When people get fired up and passionate about things, that's when we actually start talking about what matters.

With that said, using a derogatory term for something and vaguely asking for opinions on the matter makes this a semi-loaded question with questionable intent. You might as well ask, "What do you guys think about morons?" with literally zero context. But even then, I'd have to say that I've also been known to be a moron.
 
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Suzanne

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Very hard to deal with and always keep quiet, when someone is being like that, because I know only too well, that voicing my disgust will end badly for me.
 

Progster

Gone sideways to the sun
V.I.P Member
It can be annoying, but I feel that people are often not aware of how they are coming across when they do it and aren't doing it on purpose. It's part of human nature, really, and most people do it at some point.
 

Gerald Wilgus

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
There is a lot of virtue signaling in political discourse and propaganda. I especially dislike that, as it frequently substitutes for concrete material action. It lets people think that they are good without having to actually make themselves uncomfortable.
 

Tom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
It's like those holistic medicine practitioners with their 'wholier then thou' attitude.

;)
 

Swansong

New Member
Obnoxious and unbearable that's why I've been trying to move away from them as much as I can, even if inevitably they're a part of my personality.
 

maycontainthunder

May also contain missing cakes.
V.I.P Member
The former two are an issue and potentially undesirable/irritating. The latter... Virtue Signalling; where is the line drawn between jumping on a bandwagon because it is perceived as 'popular' and doing it because you believe in something?

I feel this aspect could be a little sticky. With so many suit-wearers doing it those who believe in something will get tarred with the same brush.

I feel there is 'unfair ground' here.
 

Neonatal RRT

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
How do you view these qualities?
To summarize I think the behavior can come off as rude, impolite, and generally unacceptable social behavior. The psychology of this behavior can vary, but typically, in my experience, it is someone trying to mask their insecurities about themselves.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
These traits dont inherently make someone into some sort of mustache-twirling villain.
I beg to differ.
The words I presented have negative connotations imbedded.
All three are deemed as being arrogant/supercilious.

For example: Sanctimonious

Rather than being "sanctimonious", one could be "virtuous".
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
When people get fired up and passionate about things, that's when we actually start talking about what matters.
What is your intention in situations such as theses?
Is it to humiliate another person by showing the "goodliness" <sic> in yourself?
If so, I think you may want to work on that.

If you are standing up for someone who is being oppressed, regardless of public acclamation, then I will stand by your side. :cool:

"Traditional" autistics were known to be protective, btw.
These days, anything goes, or so it sometimes seems.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
It can be annoying, but I feel that people are often not aware of how they are coming across when they do it and aren't doing it on purpose. It's part of human nature, really, and most people do it at some point.
Agreed. But that is where life experience and personal enlightenment come into play.
 

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