1. Welcome to Autism Forums, a friendly forum to discuss Aspergers Syndrome, Autism, High Functioning Autism and related conditions.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Private Member only forums for more serious discussions that you may wish to not have guests or search engines access to.
    • Your very own blog. Write about anything you like on your own individual blog.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon! Please also check us out @ https://www.twitter.com/aspiescentral

Rigidity and autism?

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by Myrtonos, Jan 17, 2021.

  1. Myrtonos

    Myrtonos Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    434
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2013
    Karma:
    +422
    So those on the spectrum often have their rigidities, rigid behaviour, rigid beliefs, etc. But even those without autism can have their rigidities too. In fact, it has been the case before that I might have a stance on something that neurotypicals might say is rigid and I might talk to a person that doesn't seem to be on the spectrum that has a different and opposing stance that might seem rigid.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  2. SusanLR

    SusanLR Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

    Messages:
    3,649
    Joined:
    May 22, 2017
    Karma:
    +6,676
    Everyone seems to have certain things they are very rigid about and even if proof points elsewise.

    I don't know if it is the ASD, but, I've always been told I am very stubborn.
    To me that means I hold firm to my beliefs and never want someone trying to change them.
    It can also apply to wanting something. I want what I want when I want it and will do most anything
    to get it. Not stealing, but, pursuing.

    My feeling on ASD and rigidity is routine is the most difficult.
    If my plans are changed to accomodate someone else or something keeps me from my routine,
    I feel zoned out in my brain. Thinking becomes foggy. And I feel "spaced out".
    A type of dissociative condition.
    That's one main reason I don't like living with someone.
    Especially someone who disrespects bounderies. Just interrupts or asks to stop what I'm doing
    and do what they want.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  3. Progster

    Progster Gone sideways to the sun V.I.P Member

    Messages:
    6,457
    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2014
    Karma:
    +14,187
    My experience with people is that when they accuse me of being rigid, it's because I disagree with them, I stick to my guns and won't concede or bend to their way of thinking. Having different opinions to others is not an issue; the issue only comes about when one person tries to force another person change their opinion to match theirs. Opinions need to be respected, including those that are different to your own.

    Other circumstances where I've been told that I'm rigid, is when, as @SusanLR also says above, I haven't wanted to change my routine or plans to fit in with other people's. This is sometimes necessary and one needs a degree of flexibility, but I often struggle with this - it can cause me a considerable amount of stress.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Aspychata

    Aspychata Serenity waves, beachy vibes

    Messages:
    5,081
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2019
    Karma:
    +9,581
    When people can't manipulate me then l am accused of being rigid. When l won't release my boundaries to follow your needs then l am inflexible. My employer does stick up for me when l am bullied. l am learning to get a tab better but l really need to work on this more. If being rigid means having boundaries then l am rigid. We are rigid to a degree and it can get us in trouble but l think we do try to listen and accept criticism.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  5. MyLifeAsAnAspie

    MyLifeAsAnAspie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    149
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2020
    Karma:
    +212
    I don't think rigid beliefs is strongly correlated with ASD. I realize there seems to be some connection. I would think that borderline delusional beliefs, like flat earth and creationism have no correlation with ASD. On the other hand, isn't our rigid thinking helpful when it comes to the breakthrough ideas that often come from ASD people. When we latch onto an obtuse idea, we are certainly less likely to be dissuaded from it than others. I would hope we are likely to listen to concrete arguments against the idea though. Like the overwhelming scientific evidence against the two beliefs I listed.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. Finder

    Finder Active Member

    Messages:
    170
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2020
    Karma:
    +285
    ASD is not a single trait. The fact the each trait can be found in others is not a surprise.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Neonatal RRT

    Neonatal RRT Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    221
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2020
    Karma:
    +568
    I am thinking I used to be more prone to these rigid thought patterns prior to my ASD diagnosis. A combination of my neurodivergent, "out-of-the-box" thinking, my intense need to go down "rabbit holes" in order to find meaning, and a narcissistic streak in me, often lead to me being someone that others really couldn't discuss things with. Once I settled on a position, that was it.

    After my ASD diagnosis, and a considerable amount of self-reflection and study,...I realize some of my positions on things were wrong as I was not considering,...and not studying other ways of interpreting what was before me. Mostly, it comes down to me,...now,...having others proof read and edit professional communications, lectures, etc. It means,...now,...discussing things with my up-line before opening my mouth to the staff. It means,...now,...learning to listen to other opinions and beliefs, as others will may approach things based upon a different life experience and area of study. All of this goes both ways, especially now that people that I work with know that I am on the spectrum,...I am given a bit of grace,...but they've known for years that I've special talents that they do not have. It's a bit strange now, for the both of us,...me asking them their thoughts on something. I now understand that sometimes two, very different ways of thinking can lead to much better decision making,...if both are willing to be open to that interaction.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. Kevin L.

    Kevin L. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    80
    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2017
    Karma:
    +111
    I'm accused of being rigid and inflexible, by both my co-workers and my family.

    Part of this comes from my sensory issues. When one lives in an unpredictable, miserable, and painful cacophony of sounds, lights, and unpleasant textures and tastes . . . I tend to try to control my environment so that I can avoid the misery as much as I can.
     
  9. Shillelagh

    Shillelagh Wait... What?

    Messages:
    19
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2021
    Karma:
    +17
    When it comes to beliefs, I'm pretty rigid, but not totally inflexible.

    When comes to routine, I seem to mostly be rigid when it comes to bad habits I'd like to brake lol.
     
  10. Myrtonos

    Myrtonos Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    434
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2013
    Karma:
    +422
    In my case, if someone without autism has a different, seemingly rigid stance, I might find it hard to believe they know better given my personal experience and having heard the neurotypicals are less clear thinkers and that the autistic community thinks better.
     
  11. HeroOfHyrule

    HeroOfHyrule Chicken Chaser

    Messages:
    622
    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2020
    Karma:
    +565
    I always thought "rigidity" was about routine and change. I am very "rigid" in the sense that I don't take changes to my routines well. I used to think I did, but I just thought the intense stress that I feel from it was normal. I learned most people don't freeze up and feel panicked when how they're expected to do something or go about their day changes.