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Featured Psychiatric Medications Worsening Sensory Issues?

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by Butterfly88, May 23, 2020 at 3:48 AM.

  1. Butterfly88

    Butterfly88 Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Lately I've been wondering if perhaps my psychiatric medications could be making my sensory issues worse. They just seem too severe. Is this a thing? Anyone else have experience with this? If they were in fact making it worse would I likely be having over side effects too?
     
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  2. BrokenBoy

    BrokenBoy 戯言使い(Nonsense User)

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    What are you taking? You should talk to your psychiatrist about these problems.
     
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  3. Darwin

    Darwin Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    It depends on what exactly do you take.
    For me, sertraline does the exact opposite; it helps calm my senses down. That’s actually the only reason I am taking it.
     
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  4. FormerlyAutistic

    FormerlyAutistic Active Member

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    Researchers found a newer condition called mast cell activation syndrome that can make people sensitive to drugs and other chemicals. Researchers estimate as many as 1 in 10 people have it as well as 50% of those who are autistic. It's a likely cause of multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome. It's can also cause autism, eczema, food intolerance, histamine sensitivity, and digestive problems depending on which mast cells are affected.
     
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  5. Fino

    Fino Alex V.I.P Member

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    The most logical possibility that I can think of is that your medications are causing anxiety and the anxiety is making the sensory issues worse, as it does.
     
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  6. Rasputin

    Rasputin ASD / Aspie V.I.P Member

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    I have actually read about mast cell activation syndrome, because as a youth and during adolesence I had severe hives (urticaria) caused by food allergies, intolerance to milk/dairy, grains, and digestive issues. I had to take epinephrine injections every 8 hrs. for years to control the allergic reactions. I also have eczema, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis. This was before mast cell activation syndrome was discovered. I have not been tested for this, however nothing would surprise me at this point.
     
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  7. Ken S.

    Ken S. Dog Cookie King V.I.P Member

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    I can't take any type of anticonvulsant (which for some stupid reason they LOVE to prescribe for off label purposes) other than benzodiazepines. I can't take antidepressants either. They both make my sensory problems worse.
     
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  8. Butterfly88

    Butterfly88 Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Thank you everyone. I plan to talk to my doctor about this but can't see her right now with the pandemic. Currently I am taking Lamictal ER, Geodon, Xanax, and Inderal.
     
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  9. Ken S.

    Ken S. Dog Cookie King V.I.P Member

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    Lamictal is an anticonvulsant. Unfortunately what doctors don't tell people is that medications like Lamictal, Keppra, Dilantin, Oxcarbazepine, etc. cause toxic psychosis in one out of every five hundred people. A (to me) awful high number statistically for them to keep that information off the patients list of side effects. In fact it was learning this information that led me to SPD, ASD and finally getting diagnosed.
     
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  10. Butterfly88

    Butterfly88 Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Thank you for the information @Ken S..
     
  11. FormerlyAutistic

    FormerlyAutistic Active Member

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    Dr. Temple Grandin found some autistic people do better on much lower doses, sometimes less than the lowest dose available. Here's an article she wrote about it. "People with autism have very sensitive nervous systems. Some individuals may require much lower doses of medications than people with a normal nervous system." Evaluating the effects of medication on people with autism | Autism Support Network

    I recommend watching these videos. They really helped me greatly with my problems and may reduce your need to take all those drugs or allow you to use a lower dosage with your doctor's approval.

     
    Last edited: May 24, 2020 at 8:38 AM
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  12. Butterfly88

    Butterfly88 Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Thank you for the info. I've done CBT in the past but will check out the video anyway.
     
  13. FormerlyAutistic

    FormerlyAutistic Active Member

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    It's hard to diagnose because mast cells release many different kinds of mediators and commercial tests are only available for some of them. That means someone could still have it even if all the available tests are normal. It's also hard to treat. While antihistamines (like Claritin and Allegra) may help a little (blocking one of many mediators), the main treatment is avoiding triggers (such as high histamine foods, milk, gluten, pollen). Two big triggers to avoid are stress (CBT through videos or self-help books can help greatly) and high histamine foods. Here's a list of them: What to Eat (and NOT eat!) with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome - Going Beyond Low Histamine Lists
     
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  14. Rasputin

    Rasputin ASD / Aspie V.I.P Member

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    I already follow this diet which is a form of Paleo diet and have hyperuricosiuric autism, autism associated with primary hyperoxaluria and hypercalciurua. In addition I do not metabolize B9 and B12 in their common forms and have to take methylated forms due to certain homozygous gene mutations.bin addition, I take allopurinol and chlorthalidone daily to flush uric acid and calcium oxalate.
     
  15. FormerlyAutistic

    FormerlyAutistic Active Member

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    You're welcome. I think you'll find the videos helpful since they're geared to autism specific issues. If you're interested in whether mast cells play a roll, the triggers are different for everyone (and are identified through an elimination diet) although I think stress and high histamine foods (especially leftover meat) are a big problem for many people with it.
     
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  16. Els

    Els Member

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    I agree, I see those effect on myself. I cut any pill in 1/4 to check the effect before evaluating if it's worth taking all the pill or if it's already working. Half the lowest dosage of xanax relaxes me way enough, I'd cut even more if that was possible.
    I took antidepressants once, and at first I was taking half the lowest dosage... Way too high already - the 4th day I looked like a junkie, had dilated pupils, I had fever and was sweating, I vomited and fainted. It was a disaster and I started at half the lowest dose... Happy I didn't start at the dosage people told me to. I don't want to know what would've happened.
    I don't have an official ASD diagnosis through. But ASD or not, I definitely agree that some systems are sensitive and don't recquiere as much as other people. I've been told so many times it's in my mind that I can't actually believe it's been described by others & I'm not alone. Thanks for the link.
     
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  17. FormerlyAutistic

    FormerlyAutistic Active Member

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    Do foods and supplements make you more autistic? For me, they cause fatigue and "brain fog" which makes me more socially awkward and withdrawn.
     
  18. FormerlyAutistic

    FormerlyAutistic Active Member

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    I think the higher rates of sensitivity to medicines is because of MCAS. It's a newly discovered condition that hardly any doctors have ever heard of since there weren't any diagnostic criteria until 2010 and it's hard to diagnose. Some estimate that as many as 17% of the general population and 50% of those who are autistic have MCAS.

    "Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is a complex disorder hallmarked by chronic multisystem inflammatory, allergic and growth dystrophic phenomena caused by inappropriate mast cell activation. MCAS has been estimated to affect as many as 17% of the population with a severity ranging from mild to life-threatening. MCAS patients are more sensitive than the average person to chemicals in the environment, including the nondrug ("inactive") ingredients (excipients) in medications and supplements. Excipient reactivity may explain unusual side effects to medications health professionals often find puzzling, such as the patient who appears intolerant of prednisone, acetaminophen, levothyroxine, or a vitamin" Recognition and Management of Medication Excipient Reactivity in Patients With Mast Cell Activation Syndrome - PubMed
     
  19. Rasputin

    Rasputin ASD / Aspie V.I.P Member

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    If I do not follow a strict Paleo diet without red meat, I become ill. The supplements I take work for me, that is all I can say.
     
  20. Els

    Els Member

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    Yes this sounds like me. I have a long list of things I'm allergic to (mild to life threatening indeed). Thanks :)