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Living with autism

Mia

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
This is a video about a boy with autism named Cory. It made me happy to see him interacting with others. And his interest in dogs and other things. His Mom is wonderful.

Living with autism-Cory's Story
 
This is a video about a boy with autism named Cory. It made me happy to see him interacting with others. And his interest in dogs and other things. His Mom is wonderful.

Living with autism-Cory's Story

I love it :)
Using his interest to interact with others who share a similar interest.
(Dogs, dog shows, a hall filled with dogs and knowledgable owners)

He can socialise; as best he can, within that group.
Discuss dogs at a level with those who specialise in and show a specific breed

I had to wear headphones and concentrate - watch only Cory, to be able to hear what was going on in that hall.

I admired how he simply plugged his ears with his fingers to block that out.
(A way to reduce, keep a handle on stress levels ?)

Great stuff.
Thanks @Mia
 
Good Video - it confirms for me that any kid on the spectrum needs to understand what his/her condition is all about. This kid, Cory, is aware that he is different because he is treated like a weird kid. We all know he's behaving in his "normal", following interests and reacting to others. That can't be changed, nor should it be, but it causes him a lot of grief. We always talk about fitting in with NTs, but we don't seem to have a repertoire for self protection. We are deficient in the skills that others have, so it might not be a good idea to pretend that our limitations don't exist. The big bad world will always be there, but why not put attention where it is the most fruitful. Cory needs to have channels that allow him to interact with the world, in friendship and companionship, on his terms. I don't want to see him getting rejected and excluded over and over again. He needs the company of others on the spectrum to establish a comforting social life. His special interest in dogs might be overbearing or dull to the other kids at school, but not to those who share his interests. Make sure he has access to a kennel club or dog show group where he can learn more with people who share his interests. They don't have to be kids. He seems to interact with adults quite well. That's advanced.

I agree, the mother is great. She is aware of his abilities and sorrows. He needs a carefully selected social world that offers more kindness than rejection. Cory has an open personality, and he speaks to people without looking them in the face. Classic. Becoming a veterinarian might be a good choice for him - more time with animals than people.
 
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