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How to get him to stop biting

Ame568

Well-Known Member
Hey all, sorry it's been a while. My nephew keeps on trying to bite everyday, there are days where he actually does bite us (me mostly) and no matter what we do (like time-out, telling him "no biting/you are not going to bite anyone/etc", removing myself or him from the situation and so on) he will not stop. Help please?
 
My sister dealt with something like that, she had something bitter, don't know what it was unfortunately, some kind of herb/condiment. She smeared that on things he tried to bite. So when he bit it, he got that in his mouth and he did not like that at all. So he quickly learned that it was stupid to bite his mom and other things.
 
Not much help I'm sorry, but my brother was a biter. That didn't stop until he was about 8, and I think only because every time he did it the other kids would gang up on him and give him a real hiding.
 
Can you say more about when he bites? Could you attach it to something like anger or frustration or anything else? There are different reasons for children to persist with biting and a little more information about under what circumstances he does it could be helpful.

Also, does he only bite others or does he bite himself as well?
 
My now 28yo, ASD3 daughter will still bite at this age, with some caveats.
She has a mental age of 1.5yo and will bite out of anger, anxiety or for sensory reasons. (You can't always see the last one coming.)

When she was about 12, she bit into my arm one day and would not release me. I slapped her thigh just enough to sting. When she cried, she released my arm. When she tried to continue biting me, I gave her a minimal slap to her lips and she backed down. Whenever she tried to bite me after that, I would just raise my hand and she would halt her attack. It was similar for pinching.

Unfortunately, she continued to bite & pinch her teachers (who rejected and were blocked from using such physical tactics) and fellow [special ed.] students. But her bus driver was not afraid to slap pinchy fingers. (We could tell that [the driver] was not being mean.)
 
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My sister dealt with something like that, she had something bitter, don't know what it was unfortunately, some kind of herb/condiment. She smeared that on things he tried to bite. So when he bit it, he got that in his mouth and he did not like that at all. So he quickly learned that it was stupid to bite his mom and other things.

I use the same type of thing to deter puppies from biting, and chewing on valuable items and furniture.

But, before resorting to a deterrent of any type, it’s best to figure out the cause of the behavior and what might be the most helpful solution for the child.
 
My now 28yo, ASD3 daughter will still bite at this age, with some caveats.
She has a mental age of 1.5yo and will bite out of anger, anxiety or for sensory reasons. (You can't always see the last one coming.)

When she was about 12, she bit into my arm one day and would not release me. I slapped her thigh just enough to sting. When she cried, she released my arm. When she tried to continue biting me, I gave her a minimal slap to her lips and she backed down. Whenever she tried to bite me after that, I would just raise my hand and she would halt her attack. It was similar for pinching.

Unfortunately, she continued to bite & pinch her teachers (who rejected and were blocked from using such physical tactics) and fellow [special ed.] students. But her bus driver was not afraid to slap pinchy fingers. (We could tell that [the driver] was not being mean.)
Mindful isn't just accommodating developmental milestones and age specific, refering not to mental age but developments in neuro-class.
Mindful is an approach. I watched videos of teens attacking their parents and thought oh, no. But my son isn't like this, he never bit others.
I've heard of kids who bite and complaints at school.

I'm discussing starting my nixmorf school, then we will have specialists who can assist parents with these issues.
To drop a hint, at a Montessori School we do not touch one another, how do we call another person or suggest we need to review a behaviour
 
You sound early intervention case, he is probably having sensory, maybe say he wants less people or wants quiet time. Quiet time is a reading corner on floor with pillows.
 
Mindful isn't just accommodating developmental milestones and age specific, refering not to mental age but developments in neuro-class.
Not meeting developmental milestones is how autism is diagnosed, and what autism is; a pervasive developmental disorder (as compared to NT developmental tendencies).
To drop a hint, at a Montessori School we do not touch one another, how do we call another person or suggest we need to review a behaviour
“Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.” --Mike Tyson

She will touch you and she will drink your coffee if you ever set it down next to her. If she is in a mood (which is not all of the time), she will bite whoever is handy, unless she perceives a tangible deterrent. She does not play by any rules. She has no concept of "rules."

An 18 month-old NT is not inclined to "review her behavior" nor is my daughter. And her teachers found that out the hard way.

There are autistics who have age-appropriate intellects, just lacking speech, but my daughter is not one of them. She is an actual preliterate, that is what her mental age means. These people know the difference between the two. Twelve years of school did not correct those basic behavioral problems.
 
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Not meeting developmental milestones is how autism is diagnosed, and what autism is; a pervasive developmental disorder (as compared to NT developmental tendencies).

“Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.” --Mike Tyson

She will touch you and she will drink your coffee if you ever set it down next to her. If she is in a mood (which is not all of the time), she will bite whoever is handy, unless she perceives a tangible deterrent. She does not play by any rules. She has no concept of "rules."

An 18 month-old NT is not inclined to "review her behavior" nor is my daughter. And her teachers found that out the hard way.

There are autistics who have age-appropriate intellects, just lacking speech, but my daughter is not one of them. She is an actual preliterate, that is what her mental age means. These people know the difference between the two. Twelve years of school did not correct those basic behavioral problems.
But a toddler we don't correct behaviour until they are ready to understand. So we break up 2 kids and time out, direct towards a better way.
I see you really like the coffee I make, the trick is not to add sugar last, then it's best coffee. don't worry, I'll make another.

My Mom was brilliant in some ways, owe and with toddlers she pretend to cry and nurse an invisible wound. Even if reaction isn't there...we planting seeds.
 
I'm a girl and no one ever believed in me...I failed IQ tests,
Took me many years to realise I'm actually super-intelligent and my emotional IQ was slow as a teen, I was a complex 500 piece Lego set. In my 30s I superseded most with mental and emotional IQ.
So let's not judge someone who has a bi-polar episode there could be a lot under the surface.
I'm looking at loans for business at bank, but not sure ....do you think I could start as a small group and parents will pay and I prove my school...I will get necessary funding. I wanted to start my school about 6 years ago but it didn't seem possible.
 
That coffee incident happened at her first psych eval as a toddler. The psychologist turned her back just to report to us her findings and my daughter drank her still-hot coffee right down. (Bad taste does not faze her at all.)
 
I'm a girl and no one ever believed in me...I failed IQ tests,
Took me many years to realise I'm actually super-intelligent and my emotional IQ was slow as a teen, I was a complex 500 piece Lego set. In my 30s I superseded most with mental and emotional IQ.
So let's not judge someone who has a bi-polar episode there could be a lot under the surface.
I'm looking at loans for business at bank, but not sure ....do you think I could start as a small group and parents will pay and I prove my school...I will get necessary funding. I wanted to start my school about 6 years ago but it didn't seem possible.
I don't doubt your competence, generally, but a priori rationales were not effective for my ASD2 & 3 children. Even a posteriori tactics had limited effectiveness for us and their teachers. We had to "wing" it.

My ASD2 son's special ed. kindergarten teacher was in her first year and she quit the field after a year with him. And your proposed tactics do seem to work for many kids.

(Also, few parents of autistics will trust you if all you have is Kanner, but not Wing and her successors.)
 
Animals develop quickly becoming independent to survive and leave the nest. Some animals develop social habits like wolves, others solitary.

They say humans are animals with intellect but I beg to differ....
Social brain in monkeys develops quickly with physical attributes to climb trees Nd be superior to humans in physical ability.
Human take longer to walk on two legs and whole brain thing is complex...but some people mimic animals and don't have human inventions.
Furthermore to be a genius you may not be a quarterback on sport team, you may be antisocial.
But some insist on bring gifted without disabilities and annoy me because most often can't prove how they got answer.

I'm not an autism puzzle, I'm a complex Lego set that takes time to assemble.
No, not all humans share intelligence some use monkey see, monkey do. Some make use of outside resources to pretend they are intelligent.
Some are genius
 

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I don't doubt your competence, generally, but a priori rationales were not effective for my ASD2 & 3 children. Even a posteriori tactics had limited effectiveness for us and their teachers. We had to "wing" it.

My ASD2 son's special ed. kindergarten teacher was in her first year and she quit the field after a year with him. And your proposed tactics do seem to work for many kids.

(Also, few parents of autistics will trust you if all you have is Kanner, but not Wing and her successors.)
I'm using building blocks of Maria Montessori who has more insight.
I said nothing about psychologists. Actually there was a time I nearly three my son's speech therapist out window because she was correcting overall communication Nd staring into my son's eyes. Not with muscle, but just felt like flipping her chair backwards and levering her out the window.
Then I discovered Carrie Clark and her method for consonant deletion and suddenly life was on track, my son didn't sound 'strange' when he tried to get sounds out....
 
But, before resorting to a deterrent of any type, it’s best to figure out the cause of the behavior and what might be the most helpful solution for the child.

The women in my family tend to put their foot down. :) If a kid bites them, they will stop it. I think they see it as the most helpful solution for everyone.
 
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The women in my family tend to put their foot down. :) If a kid bites them, they will stop it. I think they see it as the most helpful solution for everyone.
Oh, I wasn't saying "Don't do it" at all. I was more just trying to get clarification as to what was causing the behavior, in case there's a different way to solve it.
Different things work for different kids, and not others. That would've really freaked me out as a child lol and I definitely would've stopped after that, but some kids might have a different reaction.

I definitely wouldn't put using a deterrent like bitter apple spray on your hand or on an object to prevent biting, in the same category as like, putting a bar of soap or a dirty sock in a kid's mouth (both happened to me as a kid, as an abuse tactic no less, and are now classified as child abuse and are against the law in a lot of places.)

Edited to add that I would also never do something to a puppy that isn't safe or humane to do to a human toddler.
 
Too much emphasise on professionals who can't give answers....

Parent's cursing doctors who keep changing meds they can't even explain how it works.
Heavy focus on types of diagnosis and other specifics...

I had interest in socialising but for various reasons didn't find it was working,
Narrow minded or shallow
Misinterpreting what I meant with limited perspective of your opinions

I think many parents just wanting ways to make life better, for parent and child...are keen to find out about progress.

Maybe I won't just facilitate my school, I'm going to ask parents permission to personally reach the low functioning class. It's just the way I am, give me a challenge and I will show you.
 
My now 28yo, ASD3 daughter will still bite at this age, with some caveats.
She has a mental age of 1.5yo and will bite out of anger, anxiety or for sensory reasons. (You can't always see the last one coming.)

When she was about 12, she bit into my arm one day and would not release me. I slapped her thigh just enough to sting. When she cried, she released my arm. When she tried to continue biting me, I gave her a minimal slap to her lips and she backed down. Whenever she tried to bite me after that, I would just raise my hand and she would halt her attack. It was similar for pinching.

Unfortunately, she continued to bite & pinch her teachers (who rejected and were blocked from using such physical tactics) and fellow [special ed.] students. But her bus driver was not afraid to slap pinchy fingers. (We could tell that [the driver] was not being mean.)
This is an ABA resource, I don't agree with ABA however I do agree the condition could change, but would be better to tackle your daughter's issues at age 13
How??? Not with ABA

Individuals who display severe signs of autism (level 3) and are thus, labeled “low-functioning” need significant help in their daily routine. They will have significantly limited abilities to communicate and display frequent aggression, elopement, and/or self-injurious behavior. They are incredibly resistant to changes in daily routines and may display extreme sensitivity to sensory input. Individuals who have level 3 autism need 24/7 care and likely have a lower IQ and/or learning disability. As we have stressed, the earlier the intervention, the better chance of success the individual has in their future.

Just because a person has severe autism does not mean symptoms will remain at that level. ABA therapy continues to prove its effectiveness at skill acquisition, language and communication development, and behavior interventions for children with any level of autism symptoms. Don’t wait to explore your therapy options!
 
My now 28yo, ASD3 daughter will still bite at this age, with some caveats.
She has a mental age of 1.5yo and will bite out of anger, anxiety or for sensory reasons. (You can't always see the last one coming.)

When she was about 12, she bit into my arm one day and would not release me. I slapped her thigh just enough to sting. When she cried, she released my arm. When she tried to continue biting me, I gave her a minimal slap to her lips and she backed down. Whenever she tried to bite me after that, I would just raise my hand and she would halt her attack. It was similar for pinching.

Unfortunately, she continued to bite & pinch her teachers (who rejected and were blocked from using such physical tactics) and fellow [special ed.] students. But her bus driver was not afraid to slap pinchy fingers. (We could tell that [the driver] was not being mean.)
Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder experience deficits and delays in varying areas, or on a spectrum. This means while a child could be entirely nonverbal and need help socially, they could also excel academically. This type of child is likely to be labeled “low-functioning”, when in reality, their high academics demonstrate anything but “low functioning”.

In contrast, a child could be labeled “high-functioning” due to their ability to speak verbally and make friends but lack academic skills that lead them to struggles in the classroom. As you can see, the terms simply don’t make sense. What one child lacks, the other might excel in, and yet both have a diagnosis of autism.

Despite the ever-changing vocabulary in the world of ABA and Autism, most can agree that specific symptoms are typically seen as either high or-low functioning. A typical ASD individual displaying low-functioning, or “Level 3”
 
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