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Featured Children with Autism vs Adults with Autism

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by Fade2black, Feb 24, 2020.

  1. Gracey

    Gracey Well-Known Member

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    perhaps if autistic children are recognised young enough,
    they can be helped learn some of the skills they're going to rely on in their adulthood?

    In some cases the help offered in the younger years may ease some of the difficulties they may have otherwise struggled with as adults?

    Resulting in most of the funding and a jolly big effort invested in the younger years?


    If you've made it this far,
    and are still relatively sane whilst keeping a roof over your head and food in your belly then my goodness,
    You need to be 'bigging up' yourself.

    Blowing one's own trumpet.

    Struttin' like John Travolta.

    Award yourself some kind of trophy for the intelligence a monstrous effort like that requires over a lifetime.

    I'm not saying it's easy,
    (that's where my admiration comes in :))

    Half of the time I do wonder if perhaps the local authorities are stretched for funding and so they have to prioritise?
    Direct funding to where it will have the greatest impact?
    (and they may not know what to do with middle aged/senior aspies?)
     
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  2. HidinginPlainSight

    HidinginPlainSight Well-Known Member

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    There is money in autistic children. Their parents buy books, lobby to fund the next "cure" and provide a sympathetic object to both of these.

    Autistic adults represent public funding for something all together less sympathetic.

    This isn't a hard one to figure out.
     
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  3. SDRSpark

    SDRSpark Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Nailed it.
     
  4. megacomic

    megacomic Just that awkward guy.

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    Because we are cute as kids but once we start growing facial hair our odd behaviors are creepy and weird and we should just be hidden away and invisible because we make people uncomfortable. At least that's how I interpret societies treatment of us.
     
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  5. Giraffes

    Giraffes Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Interesting topic, i have worked with children with Autism in education and in social care and have seen support for the triad of impairement have positive effect,however as a late diagnosed adult having declaired my own Autism whist working within those fields i have meet with ignorance, predudice and harsh treatment including a training course run by the 'National Autistic Society' i asked the trainer to limit their facial expressions and boby lauguage' and they did this for 5 minutes before returning to previous presentation causing my anxiety to increase!!!!!!!
     
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  6. Jamison

    Jamison New Member

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    This for me has always been my big pet peeve with how society handles autism, and it's really gotta change, and I really do believe that it will change. The thing about society is that its views and norms constantly change over time. What really matters is that we all do our part to help make that change. We can do that in so many ways which includes being open about autism to those we know, supporting groups and organizations with the same views and goals, and letting our voice be heard about the matter.

    But yeah, the fact that autistic adults end up being ignored is pretty irritating. I've been trying to do some research about my own ASD and all I get is stuff for parents with autistic children. It's really frustrating. I think that's what mostly drove me to this community because I can find answers from people with the same experiences as me.
     
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  7. Yeshuasdaughter

    Yeshuasdaughter Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    It's Rudy Huxtable syndrome.

    We grow older, aren't as cute, and are replaced by a new face.
     
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  8. dbalzate

    dbalzate New Member

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    I think it's more a PR stunt than actual care for autistic children. We, as adults, are facing real discrimination and we need to mask as much as possible to be viewed as persons. Sadly all is a PR stunt to be viewed as "caring organizations" and they aren't caring at all about autistic people.

    Sorry for my bad English
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2020
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  9. Giraffes

    Giraffes Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Debalzate I agree I had ‘Prospects’ the employment section of the ‘National Autistic Society’ ‘help’ me find a job, or they said that to boost their success ratio intact I found the job and their support made no difference to keeping the job
    Also I’ve had experience of staff ‘grilling’ me about how Autism affect my life, but refusing to reply when I asked how much they earned as I’ve found myself underemployed my whole life, but they’re the experts hilarious
     
  10. Rasputin

    Rasputin ASD / Aspie V.I.P Member

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    I posted about this separately in a new thread, but this is a useful guide intended to mentor younger people is navigating ASD issues.

    "Been There. Done That. Try This!: An Aspie's Guide to Life on Earth"https://www.amazon.com/dp/1849059640/ref=cm_sw_r_other_apa_i_tC0wEbZNR2AD5

    Now that I am coming to terms with my diagnosis, I am thinking about becoming acting in an adult ASD group as a potential mentor.
     
  11. Rasputin

    Rasputin ASD / Aspie V.I.P Member

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    I agree, and I was very good at masking until very recently. And most people, even neurotypicals, would consider me successful. People with ASD can enjoy full, productive lives.
     
  12. Rasputin

    Rasputin ASD / Aspie V.I.P Member

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    I am not convinced that the support given to children with autism helps them later in life. In fact, I wonder if this support doesn't weaken their resolve. I was 61 when I was diagnosed, and I did not receive any accommodations growing up or even during my career. More importantly, I had no one telling me I had limitations.

    Suddenly one month after being diagnosed I have experienced the prejudice. It's as if I am not the same person I was a month ago. I agree this has to change.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2020
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  13. Rasputin

    Rasputin ASD / Aspie V.I.P Member

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    I feel very fortunate in having not been diagnosed until I was 61. Had I received support and accommodations growing up for ASD, I might not have had a full normal life.

    I am considering being open in volunteering as a mentor to young adults. They need to hear the truth, and they need practical advice to help them succeed.
     
  14. Fade2black

    Fade2black Well-Known Member

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    I agree, multiple studies have shown when people are repeatedly told they are oppressed, they begin to believe they are oppressed and they create limitations that only exist in their own mind. I was officially diagnosed in my 50's. Although I always knew I was different while never knowing "why," I worked harder to overcome my shortcomings to fit in and move forward.

    Had I been told I'm Autistic early in my life, there is no doubt, I would have had a defeatist attitude and I would have never gone as far as I have. I'm 100% sure of this.
     
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  15. Rasputin

    Rasputin ASD / Aspie V.I.P Member

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    I think some of the older people with ASD would be good candidates to mentor younger adults with ASD. I am kicking this idea around, but I am not sure what opportunities exist in my area.
     
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