• Welcome to Autism Forums, a friendly forum to discuss Aspergers Syndrome, Autism, High Functioning Autism and related conditions.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Private Member only forums for more serious discussions that you may wish to not have guests or search engines access to.
    • Your very own blog. Write about anything you like on your own individual blog.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon! Please also check us out @ https://www.twitter.com/aspiescentral

Chemotherapy may make cancer worse

Nitro

Admin/Immoral Turpitude
Staff member
Admin
V.I.P Member
When my Mom had cancer and got her chemo treatments, I began to grow my hair long in order to allow her to wear a wig fashioned out of one of her offspring's hair to give her back some dignity.

I failed to deliver because she lost her battle before my crop was ready.

I have since continued on that path and donate it to a just cause.
That is why I wear my hair so long.
 

Streetwise

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
When my Mom had cancer and got her chemo treatments, I began to grow my hair long in order to allow her to wear a wig fashioned out of one of her offspring's hair to give her back some dignity.

I failed to deliver because she lost her battle before my crop was ready.

I have since continued on that path and donate it to a just cause.
That is why I wear my hair so long.
Wish I had the hair I had before my staph infection ,it would have helped a woman, I'd never heard of donating hair before my infection
 

Magna

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I'm more or less cancer ignorant. The only thing I have to go on is having a sister-in-law and my mom die of it (brain cancer and lymphoma respectively).

Chemo seemed to be what killed my sister-in-law. She was physically ok before starting the chemo but after starting chemo she went downhill very rapidly, cracked her head on the edge of a bathroom sink after passing out and ultimately not having any more quality time to "get her house in order", spend quality time with family, etc before she died. It seemed to me, again ignorant on these matters, that chemo robbed her of the little time she had left.

After she died I read about people who refuse chemo and choose to live out their lives without it. I read about an old woman (in her 80s or 90s if I recall) who refused chemo and instead went on a cross country road trip with one of her adult children and their spouse.

I do hope there's a better cure for cancer sooner than later.
 

Owliet

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I lost my grandmother to throat cancer when I was 11. I still remember feeling confused by how one minute she seemed to be okay and then the next she went rapidly down in health. We were on holiday at the time, her last words to me were a few days before she went to hospital from a haemorrhage and died. It was the first time I had experienced a loss of a relative.
I support it. Screw Cancer, and Screw Chemo too.

100%!

I lost my pink warrior Mom to breast cancer, so I can only hope to understand @Yeshuasdaughter 's frustration.

I am so sorry about your mom.

I failed to deliver because she lost her battle before my crop was ready.

I have since continued on that path and donate it to a just cause.
But you haven't failed her, you still fight the battle in remembrance for her by doing what you are doing now.
The only thing I have to go on is having a sister-in-law and my mom die of it (brain cancer and lymphoma respectively).

I am sorry for your losses.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
My dearest cousin lost her battle with breast cancer in 1997. First the ravages of lengthy chemotherapy followed by her last days in a hospice. That's no way for anyone to go, IMO. :(

I just wish science came up with better alternatives.
 

SusanLR

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I've experienced cancer first hand.
A rare form of liver cancer and had half of my liver removed 12 yrs. ago.
Here are the stats I was given:

30% chance of surviving the surgery.
2 years survival rate if surgery was successful.
No chemo was known to be given for this particular type.
My Oncologist said I could try it if I wanted, but, it had not been known to help.

I told him NO. I didn't want to try chemo. I would rely on my immune system to keep it from returning.
My Mom was also struggling with a different type of liver cancer at the time and multiple myeloma.
I wanted to remain able to be her caregiver.

She didn't survive. Died 3 years later.
Hers was inoperable and taking chemo.

Now when I tell doctors, nurses and anyone in general that I am a 12 year survivor
they say things like, "Wow. I've never known anyone to survive that long with what I went through."
Thanks, but, it brings my attention to it and I believe that was part of why I made it.
I went about my life as if it never happened.
I've known several people who think they were cured from chemo. Then it came back and
chemo did nothing the second time around.
 

phantom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
My mom has had breastcancer for a little longer than 2 years now, it sucks ass, not sure what else to say about.
 

Streetwise

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
It makes me rethink my attitude to the free vet hospital re not giving chemo to the dog jay(heart cancer no therapy for that cancer) and cat socks(mouth cancer) they never offer chemo
 

Neonatal RRT

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
1. Not all cancers are the same.
2. Not all chemotherapy agents are the same.

However, more to the point here is that with regards to cancer cells, there are "mother cells",...the original cancer cells, and there are "daughter cells",...mutated cells that tend to be more aggressive and cause metastasis. Cells that are second, third, fourth generation, and so on are often mutated, as well. Even after genetic studies are performed on tumors to select the "perfect" chemotherapy, cells can mutate once exposed to the agent, and then you have a "different" cancer cell line to deal with. If the chemotherapeutic agents are killing daughter cells, but then they mutate,...more metastasis. If the mother cells are not killed,...more mutation and metastasis. It's a sick and cruel game of "Whack-a-Mole" that can go on for years. Tumors often shrink to the point where they appear to go away,..."you beat cancer",....only to show up months or years later again.

I think as of late, the latest and more successful regimens are now involving immunotherapies to use your own immune cells to target and kill the cancers.

I've recently lost a brother and a sister-in-law to cancer after having the "best doctors" in the nation do all sorts of regimens, genetic testing, etc. Even a recent survey of oncologists were asked if they would treat themselves with their own regimens,...over 90% said NO. However, this is within the context that the "standards of care" are there from a medical-legal perspective and although there may be "alternative medicine" out there that may or may not be efficacious,...it hasn't been put through rigorous testing,...so at this point, it's all anecdotal. It's very frustrating.
 

New Threads

Top Bottom