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Autism IS a Disability

phantom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Well... you don't have a choice in whether you accept it. The choice is in how you cope with it.

There is something to be said for communicating with other people in the same boat as you are. It eases the sense of being too unique.

Sometimes I just use an online group as a substitute for socializing. Sometimes I post to codify and clarify my thoughts and look for feedback. Sometimes I give advice that I'm pretty sure will be ignored. Not much of one for complaining for its own sake but sometimes a good rant can make one feel better.
Well you can always chose to not accept it and just take the easy way out, by ending your life. The void honestly sounds better to to me life as an autistic person. To me suicide seems like the most logical and obvious cure to my autism, a lot of my research on aspergers that i have done is about whether or not its easier and makes more sense to just be dead.
 

Crossbreed

Neur-D Missionary ☝️
V.I.P Member
Well you can always chose to not accept it and just take the easy way out, by ending your life.
That is if you are correct about what happens next.
That is a terrible gamble.

OTOH, I have learned to rock my neuro-diversity from the age of 5 or 6 as, it seems, both of my parents did.
Your autism should afford you more creativity beyond just the "nuclear" option. (I would start with treating the depression, first.)
 

Au Naturel

Au Naturel
Well you can always chose to not accept it and just take the easy way out, by ending your life. The void honestly sounds better to to me life as an autistic person. To me suicide seems like the most logical and obvious cure to my autism, a lot of my research on aspergers that i have done is about whether or not its easier and makes more sense to just be dead.
You've done theoretical research but that isn't terribly useful when it comes to actual human behavior. Theories are a dime a dozen. How have you modified your desires? Do you seek out satisfaction in your special interests? I don't hear any mention of antidepressant medications. No mention of having explored philosophical approaches of Zen or Stoicism or Radical Acceptance.

If your therapist doesn't think you have Asperger's, what do they think you have? Obviously, you're not happy. Try whatever course they are suggesting for a while. You may have misdiagnosed yourself. OTOH, you may just have a bad therapist. People often have to shop around a bit before they find one that actually helps. Maybe not a therapist. Maybe a real psychologist or a psychiatrist, preferably a specialist.

It sounds like the depression is going to need to be resolved first, then you can try to get your head around whatever other issues you have.
 

Running Girl

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
My EFD ( executive function deficit) is severe, and i think it negates the usual positives that people on the spectrum have ( being highly organized, having a good memory, keeping the environment neat/ free of clutter). I have none of that. The autism all by itself has caused massive social faupas and led to massive social anxiety, and rejection leading to low self esteem. However, now that I know its all a spectrum thing, i allow myself the alone time i need and stop putting so much energy into finding and maintaining social connections/friendships. I dont try to be like neurotypicals anymore. But its still a disability, the social deficits i have, because there is the expectation everywhere I go that I demonstrate these exhausting social norms. I can " act as if " for a little while but I'de just as soon stay home !
 

phantom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
If your therapist doesn't think you have Asperger's, what do they think you have?
I have pddnos. I dont have depression and i am not mentally ill, the only comorbidity i have is social anxiety. And even if i would have depression i would call it rational depression. if i leave college without having made any meaningfull connections like friendships or a relationship with a girl im just going to blow my brains out.

Im simply just a mistake of nature, back in the day i would have already died by now. I honestly think that telling me to stick around and that i should just change my mindset is cruel.

Also i perfer the see things the way they are, i dont need some philosophical band aid or brain washing therapy. Feel good life philosophies are also a dime a dozen.
 

Crossbreed

Neur-D Missionary ☝️
V.I.P Member
I have pddnos. I dont have depression...
Suicidal ideation is a marker for depression, not PDD-NOS. If you are going to be a hyper-rational stoic, at least get your facts straight before you make any irrevocable decisions.

Do you know which severity level you are?
 
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phantom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Suicidal ideation is a marker for depression, not PDD NOS. If you are going to be a hyper-rational stoic, at least get your facts straight before you make any irrevocable decisions.

Do you know which severity level you are?
I know it's not a symptom of pddnos. And yes suicidal ideation is a marker of depression, so what? Am I not allowed to just have a bad life, know it's bad and feel bad about it? Why would I need to get diagnosed with a mental illness for reasonable hating my life? Also from what I have read depression is about have a distorted view of reality and seeing things as much worse then they are, i don't have that. I'm also not trying to be stoic, I'm not sure where you would get that from. And I would have asd 1. I got pddnos for not having enough or severe symptoms for aspergers and i don't have learning disabilities.
 

Crossbreed

Neur-D Missionary ☝️
V.I.P Member
And yes suicidal ideation is a marker of depression, so what? Am I not allowed to just have a bad life, know it's bad and feel bad about it? Why would I need to get diagnosed with a mental illness for reasonable hating my life?
AND​
Also from what I have read depression is about have a distorted view of reality and seeing things as much worse then they are, i don't have that.
So, you don't see the contradiction there...?
I'm also not trying to be stoic, I'm not sure where you would get that from.
And even if i would have depression i would call it rational depression. if i leave college without having made any meaningfull connections like friendships or a relationship with a girl im just going to blow my brains out.
"Rational depression" sounds a lot like stoicism to me.
 

Crossbreed

Neur-D Missionary ☝️
V.I.P Member
In public school my mother informed me, they considered me retarded, later a genius, leaving her very confused.
Ge-tarded...?
full
 

phantom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
AND​

So, you don't see the contradiction there...?


"Rational depression" sounds a lot like stoicism to me.
Stoicism is about indiference to pain and suffering, which I am not. I don't think any human could ever really be indifferent to that.

And i don't see any contradiction in there.

Anyway I don't feel talking about this anymore. Like i have said before I'm very bad at explaining myself.
 
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Crossbreed

Neur-D Missionary ☝️
V.I.P Member
Stoicism is about indiference to pain and suffering,...
"Rational depression" is being indifferent to depression (and where it is driving you). You are saying that there is no cause for concern. That is indifference, by definition.
 

Pieceofmind

Active Member
I'm an example of someone who has healed a lot and taken note of everything that makes it worse and hitting the nail right on the head leaving me with what I would call a baseline state of autism/schizophrenia that I need to be very careful with managing. Autism is a neurological condition that always includes inflammation and bodily differences that can cause for example allergies and sensitivities to things people normally don't have. A major example of this to me that stands out is gluten or acidic food, when I consume a large amount of gluten and acidic food. When I consume too much gluten I get extremely slow, my social skills take a major hit, and a get much more easily overwhelmed sensory wise. With acidic food like say for example I had a large amount of pizza which is a neurological death sentence for me to consume I get overstimulated very easily, more confusion, far more trouble socializing, and major mood swings. I think with much of autism a gut/brain issue is a major player in the issues with being autistic and a lot more of the issues we encounter are more likely to be societal and social in nature from what I've noticed.

But onto the good things I am simply different when it comes to how I'm wired and when I keep things at a healthy baseline though I need to live differently than normal people I do just fine in life. It's certainly a double edged sword of a situation. Autism may be the result of defects around birth but it also doesn't mean that the result isn't a unique person where given the resources and acomodations they need can still get by in a world dominated by people born what is perceived as normal. Even normal people aren't perfect and a lot of variation occurs. Whatever the source of someone being born this way everyone and everyone has a place in this circle of life and something unique to contribute to this world in a positive fashion. If everyone was the same and there wasn't anyone completely different than what is considered normal we would have a lot less than we do today. The world is a collaborative creation from everyone involved.
 

Streetwise

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Autism is a neurological condition that always includes inflammation and bodily differences that can cause for example allergies and sensitivities to things people normally don't have.
It would be more believable if you could prove that EVERY single person with autistic neurology had these conditions that a neurotypical can also have.
 

popcorn27

New Member
Having now read this whole thread I feel an immense relief...that there are other people out there with common sense. I have had to experience the toxicity of the " inspiration porn" first hand. In today's climate identity politics have become omnipotent. It gets quoted everywhere. Its used as a weapon by confused individuals. Autism is a disability. It is not you. It is not something that you have to draw from as to define who you are.

The chat sites I have used that are dedicated to Autism have always followed the same exact template. Its a constant barrage of self pity. Constantly engaging in this tug off war.. beating each other over the head with who has had it worst. It is a self serving prophesy. The bigger picture is always absent. There is a crucial distinction that nobody talks about. Being diagnosed and having Autism.

Fundamentally a diagnosis is inherently carrying with it a set of problems. Discrimination being one of them. Being diagnosed with Autism is also about socioeconomic its not just neurological. Countless people with Autism has told me that they felt happy when they got their diagnosis. They said that they finally they knew what was wrong with them.

That is not only sad it is grotesque! Who else do we ask this question? Why would anyone have to feel that something is wrong with them just because they are " different "?

I can fully understand the hunger to belong. I have felt that longing my entire adult life. But feeling like you belong should not have to come at the cost of your individuality. Autism has become synonymous with disenfranchised introverts which I feel is wholly inaccurate! I am a strong human being. I am not a victim. I will never ever allow myself to become a victim. And I will never draw from my Autism as a way to define myself. I will continue to fight for the right to be myself.

While it sometimes seems insurmountable I will never ever give up. I have lived with discrimination my entire life. I have had to fight for the right to be myself for as long as i can remember. So I just cannot accept this desperate need for Autism to set everything right. That it will somehow explain everything and grant you endless comfort.

This narrative of victimization and inspiration porn also leads to that phenomena were we can only see the trees for the forest. Why is nobody discussing the sociopolitical impact of being diagnosed with a neurological disorder? The discrimination towards people with a diagnosis? The perspective of the human being has been lost.
 
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Streetwise

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Having now read this whole thread I feel an immense relief...that there are other people out there with common sense. I have had to experience the toxicity of the " inspiration porn" first hand. In today's climate identity politics have become omnipotent. It gets quoted everywhere. Its used as a weapon by confused individuals. Autism is a disability. It is not you. It is not something that you have to draw from as to define who you are.

The chat sites I have used that are dedicated to Autism have always followed the same exact template. Its a constant barrage of self pity. Constantly engaging in this tug off war.. beating each other over the head with who has had it worst. It is a self serving prophesy. The bigger picture is always absent. There is a crucial distinction that nobody talks about. Being diagnosed and having Autism.

Fundamentally a diagnosis is inherently carrying with it a set of problems. Discrimination being one of them. Being diagnosed with Autism is also about socioeconomic its not just neurological. Countless people with Autism has told me that they felt happy when they got their diagnosis. They said that they finally they knew what was wrong with them.

That is not only sad it is grotesque! Who else do we ask this question? Why would anyone have to feel that something is wrong with them just because they are " different "?

I can fully understand the hunger to belong. I have felt that longing my entire adult life. But feeling like you belong should not have to come at the cost of your individuality. Autism has become synonymous with disenfranchised introverts which I feel is wholly inaccurate! I am a strong human being. I am not a victim. I will never ever allow myself to become a victim. And I will never draw from my Autism as a way to define myself. I will continue to fight for the right to be myself.

While it sometimes seems insurmountable I will never ever give up. I have lived with discrimination my entire life. I have had to fight for the right to be myself for as long as i can remember. So I just cannot accept this desperate need for Autism to set everything right. That it will somehow explain everything and grant you endless comfort.

This narrative of victimization and inspiration porn also leads to that phenomena were we can only see the trees for the forest. Why is nobody discussing the sociopolitical impact of being diagnosed with a neurological disorder? The discrimination towards people with a diagnosis? The perspective of the human being has been lost.
I disagree I just have a different neurology like a wolf has a different neurological state to a dog but you don't say a dog is disabled JUST different
 

popcorn27

New Member
I disagree I just have a different neurology like a wolf has a different neurological state to a dog but you don't say a dog is disabled JUST different

Everyone is different. Every human being on earth. Instead of trying to categorize people into different species we should instead concentrate on trying to cultivate individual voices. Giving them ample opportunity to grow and to be listened too. There is possibility for a community that sees friends and family as " only " human beings. Were each and every individual will be heard and seen. That is the community i want to be a part off.I feel no need to call myself a different species. I feel no need to think im special. That is a dangerous path. I thrive in the diversity of humanity. Both in its struggles and in its conquests.

I am a human being first and foremost. I have my own voice. it is not a voice created by a neurological handicap or by circumstance. It is the result of decisions that i have made. Decisions that are fully my own. You have the strength and the capability to define yourself. It is your right as a human being to be an individual. You have a voice that is truly unique. That truly only belongs to you. And it is in that rainbow of voices that we should rejoice. Our combined love for that right.
 

popcorn27

New Member
I disagreed with this statement

" However you feel about neurodiversity as a concept, neurological disability is very real. There is no question in my mind that society has a duty to relieve the suffering that disability causes, and help disabled people to live their best lives. I like to think most people agree with that general ideal. The real question is how best to get there. "

John Elder Robinson

https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/my-life-aspergers/201310/what-is-neurodiversity

I very much agree with John Elder Robinson. My own experience tells me that Society fails to help people with neurological disabilities. Society engages in rampant discrimination towards people with a diagnosis. The question whether Autism is a disability or not shouldn't be the question here. Rather the question should be why is Society not doing more?
 
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popcorn27

New Member
I did myself a disservice by saying Society fails to help people with neurological disabilities.

What I should have said is that Society needs to be ready to listen to people and their needs. Everyone has different needs and broader Society needs to be able to give everyone an education that works specifically for them. Education is crucial. Socioeconomic status is something that is very important to discuss when you talk about Autism. But sadly very few people do.

Look for example at the UK. Just as a quick example. The lowest employment rate in the UK belongs to people with Autism. Poor education could potentially lead to life long unemployment and ostracization. This is a part of the diagnosis nobody talks about. Which frankly baffles me.


Outcomes for disabled people in the UK - Office for National Statistics
 

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