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Attempted the guitar again and too daunted to draw

Dagan

Well-Known Member
With a modeler amp like I have, I use studio headphones almost exclusively. Especially for recording, it's just become my favorite way to listen overall. I always know that I'm not disturbing anyone, but I also know that my signal is going into the DAW on my laptop without any other noise disturbance compromising the sound. I know that companies out there try to push headphones that are mega expensive, but honestly, I have some $170.00 pair and then a $55.00 pair that are pretty impressive. I use one more for everyday playing, and then the others for when I do fine mixing and mastering (all sounds - music or film audio / foley fx). Really, the only thing you are looking for with headphones is their frequency response ranges. Ones with better bass range, for example, they will give you fine points of clarity for low end that you may be after. Etc. etc.
 

vergil96

Well-Known Member
With a modeler amp like I have, I use studio headphones almost exclusively. Especially for recording, it's just become my favorite way to listen overall. I always know that I'm not disturbing anyone, but I also know that my signal is going into the DAW on my laptop without any other noise disturbance compromising the sound. I know that companies out there try to push headphones that are mega expensive, but honestly, I have some $170.00 pair and then a $55.00 pair that are pretty impressive. I use one more for everyday playing, and then the others for when I do fine mixing and mastering (all sounds - music or film audio / foley fx). Really, the only thing you are looking for with headphones is their frequency response ranges. Ones with better bass range, for example, they will give you fine points of clarity for low end that you may be after. Etc. etc.
That's a very good idea to play the electric guitar on the headphones. Which brands of headphones do you recommend? I'm cuirious, because my better headphones broke and I need new ones for music as well as I want to learn the electric guitar
 

Dagan

Well-Known Member
Beyer Dynamic DT 770 pro 250 - $169.00 are the highest end ones that I think are reasonable until they just start getting stupid expensive and honestly have barely any better clarity (despite all of their claims and reviews). Everyone's ears are different, of course, but for me...these are the tops. They are made better, too. They don't have the vinyl that eventually tears up on you. They have this cloth on the ear covering (almost a kind of felt but not exactly) and should last unless a dog or something nibbles on them. If you need all-in-one for playing and mixing/mastering music, get these. You'll hear each instrument/track exactly as you wish to.

Lowest end headphones at best quality that I like are the Sterling Audio S452 - $70.00 usually. The bass response is a bit noticeably richer than most, but I like that for the style of music that I do because it's kind of letting me know what my guitar is going to sound like in a future mix when I add the bass guitar lines. So, yeah, I often play guitar using these headphones as my only "speakers" straight out of my modeler amp (the amp is rarely hooked up to an actual live speaker). No one ever hears anything besides me just picking/strumming strings, and they'd have to be right beside me to hear that, of course. I then use the Beyer for mixing/mastering, obviously.
 

tree

Blue/Green
Staff member
V.I.P Member
OP's concern doesn't seem to be about the actual guitar (hardware, so to speak).

He laments that his performance contains errors and since it falls short of
perfection, he doesn't feel motivated to practice.

Which doesn't improve his ability to play.
 

Dagan

Well-Known Member
Apologies, if I've derailed the whole thread, then. I am of the mindset that changing gear often inspires one to play more, therefore one gets better because they enjoy the experience more of learning / practicing. It's the same mindset of if someone hated driving or their skills at driving...but if it might be because they have a car without power steering, then by upgrading to what makes things quite easier controlling the steering wheel alone, they may very well have a far better experience and therefore become better skilled. Cars can be easier to handle with better tires, as well, and as one learns of whatever upgrades, the entire experience becomes more enjoyable. I had only positive intentions.
 

Markness

Young God
V.I.P Member
I can’t play guitar solos and noted riffs are difficult for me. I also can’t do pinch harmonics (The so-called “pig squeals.”) nor play by ear.
 

chincey_james

Well-Known Member
I have been playing guitar for most of my life. In my opinion, there are two secrets to learning an instrument:

1. Enjoy every stage. A beginner should find joy in imperfection. Music is about expressing feeling even in private. If the goal is to impress yourself or others, then you likely won't have the intrinsic motivation to continue learning. Music is its own reward, right here, right now.

2. Give it time. Music is all about internalizing patterns of hand movement so that you can do it without thinking. Eventually, you will start playing without much logical thought. That is the goal. Music is far from logical. You have to find the music in a different part of your brain.
 

tree

Blue/Green
Staff member
V.I.P Member
I can’t play guitar solos and noted riffs are difficult for me. I also can’t do pinch harmonics (The so-called “pig squeals.”) nor play by ear.
What can you do?

Can you play a tune that other people can recognize?


Do you ever enjoy practicing?
Or does your disappointment at not being at expert level
outweigh any pleasure?
 

vergil96

Well-Known Member
I can’t play guitar solos and noted riffs are difficult for me. I also can’t do pinch harmonics (The so-called “pig squeals.”) nor play by ear.
You should learn chords first and practice songs that consist of chords only or are based on them.

Playing by ear isn't something anyone can do right away, it comes with practice. Solos are hard too.
 

Dagan

Well-Known Member
Soloing does require the most practice of all. You are learning the patterns of scales for each fret, and then you just keep playing them over and over and over until you become faster. It's brain to finger coordination a la mode!

Pinch harmonics and squeals, though, I have found come down to a split of two areas - one being the amount of gain (distortion) and mids / treble settings - second that each guitar tends to have its own sweet spots, as well (and per whatever tuning you're in)....it's when the actual build and fret work done on your neck absolutely will be unique to you, your style, speed, the pressure you play with, your pick thickness and again...your strings (gauge and metals used).
 

scleod

Active Member
I picked up my guitar last night to practice with it. Unfortunately, I still struggled with it and messed up while attempting to play certain songs.

Despite getting some inspiration to draw again after re-reading Chainsaw Man, I feel too daunted at the same time to draw again.

Am I too old (I am 35.) or possibly mentally impaired?
I know sometimes being with someone one on one is hard. If you can find a good instructor that is the best way to learn an instrument when you are having trouble on your own. Sometimes you can get a student or a friend and it can be a routine time each week which keeps it consistent. Or if you don't want someone else teaching you. Doing it in a routine way helps. Instruments are about routine and discipline. I always say if I can learn it anyone can and I have played guitar for years. You are NEVER old for anything. Don't give up on yourself. You can do it. Be unique and listen to the others do it your way. You got this.
 

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