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Animal Facts that are surprising/amazing/weird

Ken

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member

Do frogs drink water?​


Frogs do not drink like we do; they absorb water directly through their skin in an area known as the ‘drinking patch’ located on their belly and the underside of their thighs.


How do frogs swallow?​


Frogs use their eyeballs to swallow. Frogs eat their prey whole and their eyeballs actually sink down into their mouth and push the food down into their throat.

And people think I'm weird!
 

tree

Blue/Green
Staff member
V.I.P Member
  • Scientists revived a 46,000-year-old worm that was living in Siberian permafrost.
  • When they brought it back to life, the worm started having babies.
  • Small worms like this are known to have the ability to shut down biological functions to survive.



 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
The reason the Australian coat of arms shows a kangaroo and an emu isn't just because they're iconically Australian. Neither animal is physically capable of stepping backwards.

They were chosen to go with the national anthem - Advance Australia Fair.

 

tree

Blue/Green
Staff member
V.I.P Member
"If like us, dolphins went into a deep unconscious sleep, they would stop breathing and suffocate or drown.


To get around this, dolphins only allow one half of their brains to sleep at a time; the other half stays alert to enable the dolphin to continue breathing and look out for dangers in the environment. Dolphins only close one eye when they sleep; the left eye will be closed when the right half of the brain sleeps, and vice versa. This type of sleep is known as unihemispheric sleep as only one brain hemisphere sleeps at a time. Dolphins alternate which half of the brain is sleeping periodically so that they can get the rest they need without ever losing consciousness."


 

tree

Blue/Green
Staff member
V.I.P Member
"Elephants understand pointing without being trained..."

"Most other animals do not point, nor do they understand pointing when others do it. Even our closest relatives, the great apes, typically fail to understand pointing when it's done for them by human carers; in contrast, the domestic dog, adapted to working with humans over many thousands of years and sometimes selectively bred to follow pointing, is able to follow human pointing – a skill the dogs probably learn from repeated, one-to-one interactions with their owners."

 

tree

Blue/Green
Staff member
V.I.P Member
"Dolphins do a lot of diving and breath-holding and compared to humans, they replace a lot more of the air in their lungs with each breath. When humans take a breath, they replace only 15% of the air in their lungs with fresh air. When dolphins take a breath, they replace 90% of the air in their lungs with fresh air."

"Dolphins are born with just a few hairs on their rostrum which falls out shortly after they are born. They don’t grow any hair the rest of their lives."

"Dolphins have teeth, but they don’t chew their food (fish, shrimp, squid etc..) they swallow it whole."

"Dolphins don’t have to drink freshwater, rather they get it from the fish and other prey that they eat."

 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
Staff member
V.I.P Member
Ravens and wolves have a symbiotic scavenger/hunter relationship, but they also display playful social interactions and can act as allies in the wild.

OIP.oMahC1nVDBFSHUG8OIxTmgHaFM


Here's a few snippets from an interesting article and the link is below.

The root of the wolf-raven relationship stems from the same connection shared between all predators and scavengers. Predators catch prey, take their fill, pass it along to less dominant members of the group, and when everyone's done, scavengers dive in and take their share of what's left.

… The relationship between wolf and raven isn't defined by an antagonistic fight over flesh. In reality, their relationship is mutually beneficial to the point of being allies, even friends. As the Adirondack Wildlife Refuge notes, ravens are hyper-vigilant at kill sites, and act as sentries for wolves to protect against incoming threats. Ravens even alert wolves to nearby prey, and wolves react to raven vocalizations in turn. Wolves even have been seen visually following ravens in flight. And in a truly stunning case of give-and-take, if a carcass is too tough for ravens to peck their way through themselves, they will more or less gift the carcass to wolves by finding and leading them to it.

If this sounds unbelievable, well, the relationship doesn't stop there. Wolves and ravens also engage in play when not seeking and collaborating over food. Ravens dive in for a bit of mischief and pull at wolves' tails, and wolves have been observed chasing them around, too. Ravens and puppies even play tug-of-war with sticks, with ravens flying overhead and poking the puppies with sticks to provoke them. There's even evidence that singular ravens and wolves develop individual relationships.

… Much of this interactivity likely stems from, as stated, each species' uniquely high combination of sociability and intelligence. Even so, the wolf-raven relationship stands out as one of the most notable, in-depth, and symbiotic in nature.

 

AuAL

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
The reason the Australian coat of arms shows a kangaroo and an emu isn't just because they're iconically Australian. Neither animal is physically capable of stepping backwards.

They were chosen to go with the national anthem - Advance Australia Fair.
Chosen to go with the national anthem? That’s a bit mischievous @Outdated! ;)
 

AuAL

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
The shooting of salt water crocodiles is now banned in Australia. Instead, crocodiles that become problematic (usually due to their proximity to population centres - there have been 34 people killed in croc attacks since they became protected in 1971) have now been relocated to remote areas. Unfortunately, the crocodiles are highly territorial and often determined to get back to their home territory. There have been a number of documented returns, including one crocodile that swam 400 km from where it was relocated on the east coast of Cape York, around the tip of the cape and back to its home on the west coast.

 

AuAL

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
The existence of the platypus is one way that I know that Jesus loves us all. Because he wants us to live in a world with adorable fantasy animals.
Ah, the adorable fantasy animal that squirts venom. (The only mammal to do so.) That’s how you know you’re in Australia. Even the cute ones are dangerous.
 

Forest Cat

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Unfortunately, the crocodiles are highly territorial and often determined to get back to their home territory. There have been a number of documented returns, including one crocodile that swam 400 km from where it was relocated on the east coast of Cape York, around the tip of the cape and back to its home on the west coast.

Not surprising really, if someone relocated me I would do the same thing. Swim 400 kilometers to get back home. Nothing would stop me. :)
 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
Chosen to go with the national anthem? That’s a bit mischievous @Outdated! ;)
You just taught me something, or caused me to google it at least. Another "fact" I was taught in school that turned out to be completely false.

The reason for those animals being on the coat of arms is correct but I didn't know God Save The Queen was our anthem until 1974. Now I understand why I got in so much trouble in school when I refused to stand with the rest of the class and sing it.

I saw a bit of a confused documentary the other day that mentioned the platypus and the echidna. The doco said that they were monotremes which means they lay eggs. Wrong. They are egg laying mammals and they are monotremes, and even on Wiki the word monotreme is used as the descriptor for egg laying mammals, but that's not what the word means.

Mono Treme means One Hole. Most mammals have separate outlets for urinary and faecal matter, monotremes do not. Neither do birds or reptiles.
 

AuAL

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
The reason for those animals being on the coat of arms is correct but I didn't know God Save The Queen was our anthem until 1974. Now I understand why I got in so much trouble in school when I refused to stand with the rest of the class and sing it.
Yes, I remember singing the original anthem in school. In the infants classes we also had to salute a picture of the Queen. The teachers, standing facing the classes, would salute with their left hands, to get the little kindergarten kids to mirror them. We older, super-sophisticated 7-year-olds thought it funny to mimic the teachers and salute with our left hands. (I also remember, in senior years of high school, my friends and I would loudly and distinctly “rubarb” our way through the oath of allegiance in assembly.)

I think the key distinction with the monotremes’ “one hole” is that the cloaca is used for both excretion and reproduction. It may also be noted that the platypus and echidna are the only living monotremes.
 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
Yes, I remember singing the original anthem in school. In the infants classes we also had to salute a picture of the Queen.
My grade 1 teacher was a hippy lady that played the guitar and made us sing along to Beatles songs, I hated singing and refused to join in. When I refused to join in with God Save The Queen I got sent to see the Head Mistress. She phoned my father and told him to come and get me and take me home. Now!

He was pretty angry about being called out of work and losing half a day's pay and he demanded to know what I'd done. When the Head Mistress asked me why I wouldn't sing I told her "My Dad says we don't have a Queen, we have a Prime Minister.". Dad said that was the only time in my life that he was ever proud of me and he told the Head Mistress I deserved a day off for that.
 

Mary Terry

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I love to watch "Secrets of the Zoo" on the National Geographic (NatGeo) TV channel. The show is filmed at many zoos such as Tampa, FL, Columbus, OH, and even a zoo in Australia. It is amazing how the zookeepers can train wild animals and birds to stand still or present a part of their body for injections or X-rays, and how much the keepers love the animals.

If you love animals and want to learn about them, I highly recommend the show.
 

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