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Histamine intolerance

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member

What is histamine intolerance?​

Histamine intolerance is not a sensitivity to histamine, but an indication that you’ve developed too much of it.

Histamine is a chemical responsible for a few major functions:

  • communicates messages to your brain
  • triggers release of stomach acid to help digestion
  • releases after injury or allergic reaction as part of your immune response
When histamine levels get too high or when it can’t break down properly, it can affect your normal bodily functions.

Symptoms of histamine intolerance​

Histamine is associated with common allergic responses and symptoms. Many of these are similar to those from a histamine intolerance.

While they may vary, some common reactions associated with this intolerance include:

In more severe cases of histamine intolerance, you may experience:


It took me most of my life to determine what was happening to me.
I had to find out myself since no doctor was able to diagnose my problem.
Every doctor suspected I had a heart condition.

When I was young, I was told I had bronchitis. Wrong.
For quite some time, I believed I was allergic to wheat protein. Wrong.
Later, I believed I might have Celiac Disease. Wrong.
Later still, I thought I was gluten intolerant. Wrong, but not completely.
Finally, finally, I discovered my lifetime medical condition was due to a histamine overload.

If you have severely swollen legs due to water retention and have breathing issues when sleeping, you may have the same problem I have been having all my life,
There are other causes for swelling of the legs through water retention, such as heart disease, so that needs to be determined by a medical professional.

It is disappointing that I have had to suffer this affliction all my life, and no medical professional could determine the actual cause.
It is very satisfying that I could find out what the cause of my problem was through my own investigation.

I am simply sharing something that has plagued me all my life.
Hopefully, someone may benefit.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member

How does Histamine Affect Water Retention Problems?​


Whenever histamine is produced by the body, it causes fluid to leak into the tissues. This is intended to get rid of any harmful substances. In most people, it results in fluid retention.


As long as the allergen is temporary, the swelling and inflammation should leave. If the allergen remains in the environment for longer, water retention will become an ongoing problem.


When the problem is allowed to continue, it will gradually become worse over time.


When these issues are combined with heart or kidney problems, it can make fluid retention worse[2].


Heart problems can cause blood pressure to fall. If the blood pressure is weak, fluid can back up and fill the body’s tissue. Kidneys can also be incapable of removing fluid if they have an infection or inflammation.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member

What do You do If You Have Histamine Intolerance?​


Histamine intolerance is an underdiagnosed disorder. An individual has this problem when their body cannot breakdown histamine correctly.


If one of the two enzymes systems is not effective at breaking it down, the body will have many symptoms that resemble an allergic reaction.


These include itchy skin, hives(urticaria), tissue swelling, water retention, nasal congestion, red eyes, hypotension, chest pain, irregular heart rate, panic attack, and digestive problems.


On occasion, individuals may experience a headache, agitation, and fatigue. In very rare cases, they may lose consciousness for a few seconds.


Typical food allergies have relatively similar effects each time. With histamine intolerance, the effects are cumulative.


Basically, this means that the symptoms worsen when there is more histamine in the body. In order to treat histamine intolerance, individuals have to change their diet.


They need to eliminate fermented food and other foods that can increase histamine production. Since this list of foods can vary between people, individuals should consult with their doctor to decide on an appropriate diet.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member

The following lists are foods that should be avoided​


Histamine-Rich Foods​


  • Fermented alcoholic beverages, especially wine, champagne and beer
  • Fermented foods: sauerkraut, vinegar, soy sauce, kefir, yogurt, kombucha, etc
  • Vinegar-containing foods: pickles, mayonnaise, olives
  • Cured meats: bacon, salami, pepperoni, luncheon meats and hot dogs
  • Soured foods: sour cream, sour milk, buttermilk, soured bread, etc
  • Dried fruit: apricots, prunes, dates, figs, raisins
  • Most citrus fruits
  • Aged cheese including goat cheese
  • Nuts: walnuts, cashews, and peanuts
  • Vegetables: avocados, eggplant, spinach, and tomatoes
  • Smoked fish and certain species of fish: mackerel, mahi-mahi, tuna, anchovies, sardines

Histamine-Releasing Foods​


  • Alcohol
  • Bananas
  • Chocolate
  • Cow’s Milk
  • Nuts
  • Papaya
  • Pineapple
  • Shellfish
  • Strawberries
  • Tomatoes
  • Gluten
  • Wheat Germ
  • Many artificial preservatives and dyes

"Life? Don't talk to me about life." Marvin, the melancholy robot.

Might as well stop eating altogether.
 

Au Naturel

Au Naturel

"Life? Don't talk to me about life." Marvin, the melancholy robot.

Might as well stop eating altogether.

I imagine antihistamines would help. Something like Allegra, once a day.
 

NeilM

Well-Known Member
I too am histamine intolerant. Have known so for the past couple years. I am now 70 yo and yes my entire life would have been much better had I been diagnosed as a child. I pretty well have my diet straightened out now. I simply had to make a list of which foods are out and which ones I can still eat. Complicating my situation (and thus lengthening my taboo list) are the facts that I am also hypoglycemic, am allergic to eggs, and have AlphaGau syndrome (all red meat is out). Oddly tho, I am ok with citrus fruits, breads containing gluten, and at least one dairy yogurt.

Jonn, it is my understanding that the medical profession in the United States does not acknowledge the existence of histamine intolerance. It could have changed in the recent past but it generally fits their "opt out" pattern--something they cannot treat by writing a prescription and thus are not able to make a lot of $$$ from. Furthermore, I'm sure my list of unacceptable foods is different from yours so its something each person has to determine for themself. IOW, a doctor cannot just hand a patient a list and expect it to work.

Thank you for posting. I am always looking for more and newer information on this subject.
 

Yeshuasdaughter

You know, that one lady we met that one time.
V.I.P Member
Homeopathic Histaminum Hydrochloricum 30c. 6 pellets, twice daily. Available at Whole Foods and other similar markets, or online.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member

I imagine antihistamines would help. Something like Allegra, once a day.
I take "Telfast", an anti-histamine tablet once a day.
I believe it helps somewhat but is not a cure-all for water retention, which is something I read while researching.
I read somewhere that drinking more water helps flush out excess histamine.

It was hard to tell wtf was happening because the effect of histamine "poisoning" can take place over several days and dissipates slowly, also.

There was a time when I was convinced I was allergic to wheat protein and avoided anything with wheat in it.
It was very hit-and-miss, and I now know why.

Wheat has gluten, so it definitely helps to be on a gluten-free diet for me. But that couldn't explain why I continued to be affected when I was so careful with my diet.

Now the mystery is solved, and I did it largely due to my own investigative investigation <sic>
Hooray for me and others out there who finally "cracked the code".

Has anyone actually gone to a doctor and had it diagnosed?
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member

How to Treat Histamine Intolerance?​


  1. Do your best to remove the high histamine foods for 1-3 months.
  2. Add in a supplement of DAO by taking two pills at each meal - HistaClear is the best DAO to breakdown dietary histamines . Clear Histamine Scavenger and Natural Clear Hist are common supplements we use to help reduce systemic histamine levels and can be purchased from our store. For children, we use a great tasting chewable - ClearHist Jr.
  3. Most importantly, find the root cause for the histamine intolerance (other than the genetics). If you're on a medication that is causing the intolerance, working with your physician to wean off of these medications is essential. Some of the primary causes are gut dysbiosis and gluten intolerance, which cause a leaky gut. Other causes can be a chemical sensitivity. These can range from heavy metal toxicity to sensitivity to colorings, dyes, paint chemicals, fluoride, chlorine, fire-retardant chemicals to a wide variety of pesticides or just about anything you can imagine.
 

Au Naturel

Au Naturel
I too am histamine intolerant. Have known so for the past couple years. I am now 70 yo and yes my entire life would have been much better had I been diagnosed as a child. I pretty well have my diet straightened out now. I simply had to make a list of which foods are out and which ones I can still eat. Complicating my situation (and thus lengthening my taboo list) are the facts that I am also hypoglycemic, am allergic to eggs, and have AlphaGau syndrome (all red meat is out). Oddly tho, I am ok with citrus fruits, breads containing gluten, and at least one dairy yogurt.

Jonn, it is my understanding that the medical profession in the United States does not acknowledge the existence of histamine intolerance. It could have changed in the recent past but it generally fits their "opt out" pattern--something they cannot treat by writing a prescription and thus are not able to make a lot of $$$ from. Furthermore, I'm sure my list of unacceptable foods is different from yours so its something each person has to determine for themself. IOW, a doctor cannot just hand a patient a list and expect it to work.

Thank you for posting. I am always looking for more and newer information on this subject.
It's acknowledged, just isn't well known. Medicine is so complex that doctors can't keep up. If I find a study about it in PubMed, that means it has passed the National Institute of Health's smell test. The treatment is diet and an antihistamine regimen.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
There is a lot of scientific jargon when I research "Histamine and memory".
Does anyone have any user-friendly information about the effect of histamine on memory?
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Vitamin B6 and Vitamin C, in particular, have been shown to reduce symptoms of seasickness and histamine intolerance. The full benefits of Vitamin C and Vitamin B6 on HIT sufferers are still not fully understood. However, some studies have indicated that they may have a therapeutic effect, perhaps due to aiding the DAO enzyme, even increasing the levels naturally in the body.
 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member

Supplements for Histamine Intolerance:

Certain nutrients can help mediate the histamine response in the body and can be used for those with histamine intolerance in addition to a low histamine diet. As always, check with a healthcare professional before beginning any supplement protocol.

SupplementWhat You Should Know
CopperCopper is known to produce mild increases in DAO levels in the blood, and deficiencies are linked to increased histamine intolerance.

This micronutrient is a metal and can cause toxicity if too much accumulates in the body. It’s best to assess your red blood cell (RBC) copper levels prior to supplementing.
Zinc and copper inhibit each other’s absorption, so if you have been taking a zinc supplement for a lengthy period of time, it might be worth checking your copper levels
Take copper separate from iron,vitamin C,and zinc to improve absorption
Vitamin CImportant for immune health, Vitamin C is a strong antioxidant that also helps clear histamine from the blood by increasing DAO production.

As too much Vitamin C may cause loose stools, it’s best to start at a lower dose and increase gradually with a goal of 1000-2000 mg per day


Vitamin B6Vitamin B6 is a cofactor (a helper molecule) for the DAO enzyme.

Supplementation with B6 may help increase DAO levels naturally.


QuercetinThis is a bioflavonoid that helps calm inflammation in the body.

Quercetin also blocks histamine release from mast cells, thereby reducing allergy symptoms.


DAO enzymesTaking a DAO enzyme can be helpful for short term relief and improve histamine clearance

Khella (Bishop’s Weed)Khella is plant-based mast cell stabilizer that may be useful in reducing respiratory symptoms associated with histamine intolerance

ResveratrolFound in the skin of red grapes as well as blueberries, resveratrol is an polyphenol antioxidant that helps quench free radicals and prevents cellular damage.

Although grapes and blueberries are high histamine foods, resveratrol intake has been linked to decreased incidence of mast cell disorders by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor and interleukins, proinflammatory compounds.
Resveratrol is often found in combination with other antioxidants, although it can be taken on its own.
High potency resveratrol is pretty pricey, so it’s not a bad idea to try other supplements before this one!
Milk ThistleMilk thistle contains silibinin, a compound which helps decrease the release of inflammatory cytokines like histamine from mast cells.

This product also stimulates the liver to more effectively detoxify the body.


ProbioticsWhile fermented foods are high in histamine, taking a good quality probiotic to help balance the gut microbiome may be helpful for histamine intolerance.

One study found that Lactobacillus rhamnosus diminished mast cell release of histamine.
There are also some bacterial strains that should be avoided because they promote histamine release. The bacterial strains Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus bulgaricus are found in fermented foods like yogurt that usually aren’t appropriate for those with histamine intolerance, so it is best to avoid probiotic supplements that contain these strands as well.
Combination ProductsCertain supplements combine beneficial nutrients into one product.

Sometimes it is better to see how you react to a single nutrient before trying them in conjunction with others.





 

Jonn

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
A great way to detox from histamine poisoning is to fast.
I did that yesterday, and I am feeling much better today, which means I should get a good night's sleep tonight.

I recommend the 5x2 diet.
2 days a week fasting.
 

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