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Does anyone suffer from GERD?

DaisyRose

Active Member
During my evaluation appointment that I had last year, I learned that it is more common for people with autism to have Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). It is still unknown why this occurs because we still do not know all the information that is available.

GERD is a digestive disease that causes stomach acid to irritate the food pipe line. I have to take medication for this disease because if I don’t this can cause esophageal cancer to occur later in life. I wanted to ask and see if anyone has this condition. It was just a random thought I had recently.
 

Gerald Wilgus

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I have had it. Have yourself checked for Helicobacter pylori. It can irritate the stomach to cause GERD and cause ulcers. Other things that you can do to mitigate it is to stay away from greasy and fatty foods which increase the residence time in the stomach.
 

Moogwizard

My Brain is Only a Receiver
V.I.P Member
During my evaluation appointment that I had last year, I learned that it is more common for people with autism to have Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). It is still unknown why this occurs because we still do not know all the information that is available.

GERD is a digestive disease that causes stomach acid to irritate the food pipe line. I have to take medication for this disease because if I don’t this can cause esophageal cancer to occur later in life. I wanted to ask and see if anyone has this condition. It was just a random thought I had h

Does this feel like heart burn? Or how does one know they are suffering from it ?
 

Au Naturel

Au Naturel
During my evaluation appointment that I had last year, I learned that it is more common for people with autism to have Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). It is still unknown why this occurs because we still do not know all the information that is available.

GERD is a digestive disease that causes stomach acid to irritate the food pipe line. I have to take medication for this disease because if I don’t this can cause esophageal cancer to occur later in life. I wanted to ask and see if anyone has this condition. It was just a random thought I had recently.
We used to call it heartburn. I guess everything has an acronym these days. It is a pain in the mid-chest. I always felt it at or below the nipple line. Some people call it a burning sensation, hence heartburn. To me, it just felt like any other pain.

The valve at the top of the stomach (lower esophageal sphincter) doesn't close completely. Acid seeps up into where it doesn't belong, causing pain and chemical burns. Can be caused by being overweight, your sleeping position, eating too much at a meal, various kinds of food and drink, alcohol, caffeine, prescription drugs, and strong emotional upset. Or it could just be a naturally weak valve. It runs in families.

In my case, it usually happens if I get hit by anxiety. That's a job for antacids and Pepsid or Prilosec. Pepto Bismal helps too. Lose weight, sleep slightly upright, watch the diet for known offenders and limit alcohol and caffeine.

GERD is really very common, particularly among people experiencing high stress. It is one of those things you learn to get proactive about to prevent problems and quickly neutralize them if they start. I'll take an antacid at the slightest hint of heartburn.

 
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DaisyRose

Active Member
Does this feel like heart burn? Or how does one know they are suffering from it ?
It is called heart burn as well. I used the medical name for the condition which is GERD. You will feel a burning pain in your chest. It feels like lava is going down my food pipe (oesophagus) to my stomach.
 

Moogwizard

My Brain is Only a Receiver
V.I.P Member
It is called heart burn as well. I used the medical name for the condition which is GERD. You will feel a burning pain in your chest. It feels like lava is going down my food pipe (oesophagus) to my stomach.
Ok thank you for the clarification
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member
I had it from consuming too many illicit drugs. The drugs messed up my digestive system, causing acid reflux, especially while sleeping. It began to cause trouble breathing for me, and consuming anything or drinking water made it difficult to breathe. Lying flat overnight would cause significant breathing issues through the next morning. As soon as I stopped taking that amount of those particular drugs, it cleared up.

A really bland diet of vegetables, oatmeal, and tons of water quickened the healing. I can still feel the damage, but the condition is hugely improved since I stopped.
 

foliodoe

I'm living my whole life at once.
Since I cut back on alcohol and junk food, any issues I've had with acid reflux have mostly disappeared. I used to take antacids every single day, so I thought I was stuck with that discomfort from life!

It's interesting to read that this is a common occurrence for autistics. I would think that the unusual diets built around sensory issues and rigid routines are probably contributing factors, but that's only a guess.
 
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dragonfire42

Perpetual outsider
I only started getting significant reflux after I had chemotherapy two years ago (a common long-term side effect of the concoction I was on), and even then, it’s not usually been too bad. I’ve seen it said often that chronic GI ailments in general are more common in those with ASD, though I don’t have any myself.

I think (but am not certain) that GERD is essentially chronic heartburn, rather than only occasional or food-specific.
 

DaisyRose

Active Member
I only started getting significant reflux after I had chemotherapy two years ago (a common long-term side effect of the concoction I was on), and even then, it’s not usually been too bad. I’ve seen it said often that chronic GI ailments in general are more common in those with ASD, though I don’t have any myself.

I think (but am not certain) that GERD is essentially chronic heartburn, rather than only occasional or food-specific.
It depends on the person. My mom has had GERD her whole life that her lower esophageal sphincter is completely damaged from the acid. Back in the day the medication to treat the disease was expensive, so she couldn’t afford it.

When she goes to sleep, stomach acid will come up and burn her esophagus and throat. It’s important to make sure you keep up with it and treat it as early as possible. I started to get GERD when I was in my teen years. I was happy when my doctor prescribed medication for it, so it could be treated properly.

I was happy my insurance was able to cover it. I agree that it can be a lifelong chronic condition than an occasional or food specific condition. I get it anytime in the day or if I don’t take my medicine. It will be chronic burning pain in my chest. It will be bad sometimes that I can’t breathe.
 

Slime_Punk

Contaminating the hive mind
V.I.P Member
No GERD, thankfully. Some days I'm pretty sure my GI system is shutting down for good though, if that counts
 

SusanLR

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I've had it most of my adult life.
I feel the burn at the top of my stomach and into my throat.
Sometimes it regurgitates and feels like acid.
It is getting so bad I need to have an endoscopy because food is sticking before it goes into my stomach. Found that through a fluoroscope.
And I'm afraid to find out about cancer as it has been so long.
Certain foods and stress make it worse.

My house partner has the precancerous lining already. It's called Barrett's esophagus.
I've had liver cancer and went through removing half of the liver.
I just don't want to hear that word again. Hiding my head in the sand, but I know I've got to get it done.
 

Suzanne

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
If one could get diagnosed with ASD just by having Gerd etc, then I would not have bothered to go 4 times to see specialist, because on day one they would have diagnosed with ASD lol

Yep, and my hiatal hernia is the biggest it can be, but due to my lower spincter contracting too slowly, they are unable to operate on me and so, put me on omeproazole, which is a proton pomp.

After researcing this disease, I came across something very interesting and contrary to what drs have told me ie that I have too much acid. It is the opposite! And as soon as I found that out, I requested to only have 10mls of omeprosole twice a day and so, far it works a dream for me.

If I eat too late and too much, I have suffered GERD, but on the removal of my gallbladder, no longer does acid bile go into my mouth; just stays in my throat, which is nasty enough, but after having years of it swimming in my mouth, it is more bearable.

If I do not eat enough in the early evening, I will get heartburn, which I did last night.

Just to add, that my stomach lining and esophagus was raw red, from the acid, but amazingly, had not turned cancerous. Several year's on and had another test ( hate them) and did not bother to look at the results, figuring they would be just as they were, but something occured and I had to find that information and did a double take! No more redness. I then realised it was my using honey in my coffee and not regular sugar! So, honey cured my severe red rawness.

Drs say that one should not eat things which promote acid. But, did you know that just smelling food or being hungry actually produces acid? This is to get ready to desolve the food, in order for it to go to all the right areas of the body.
 

Dadamen

Well-Known Member
I maybe have it, I have occasional heartburn.
But, many NTs also have it, so it is not an autistic symptom.
 

musicallessness

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I never did until all the many medications they trying to manage my symptoms of autism and trauma has made me somewhat loopy like the joker, or I prefer homie the clown and a sock of rocks and say, homie don't play that, in living colour. Anyways, what I was trying to say before that last sentence became a run on was that it may be those medications or that what the used to make it in tablet form and other reasons, it may be from the impurities that our bodies have to now heal from. It's like they know and people with this condition labelled autism, we have an extra dose of healing in our DNA . I'm not a doctor and wouldn't claim to but I can talk about how much I feel better from being off this drugs. And using herbs and foods and drinks that are of purest forms, but I do like my coke and mountain dew. Which sugar is a drug that causes gets to as I've noticed myself. I feel better when I go no sugar but, somehow I'm back off the wagon again as if I need to work the twelve steps for sugarohlics anonymous.
 

NDR2

Well-Known Member
I’m diagnosed with GERD, along with my other digestive issues – mainly gastroparesis and a disaccharide deficiency. Many different foods cause me pain – even ones I used to eat regularly all my life. My diet is very limited right now, and I have to be very precise about quantities. I also have to take several things – supplements and remedies – before, during, and after meals. It has made eating a major chore.

I’m told that digestive problems run on my mother’s side of the family. She said my grandmother had them, and that two of my cousins do.

It truly stinks. I wish I could eat like I used to again.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Since 1993. My mother had it as well. Preferring omeprazole (Prilosec) to esomeprazole (Nexium).
 

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