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Disclosing my high functioning diagnosis to my future bosses?

Discussion in 'Education and Employment' started by Steve A, Oct 30, 2020.

  1. Steve A

    Steve A Active Member

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    I've been told that this would give me an advantage, depending on the company, especially when it comes to getting a job and dealing with some issues that I may face within the workplace someday.

    Ever since disclosing, I've always been told, by my bosses, that they understand and that they'd work with me if I had any issues while at work.

    However, this only included part time employment during high school and college. IMO, I think "real world" jobs may be just as understanding, even though they may still expect me to perform up to their expectations, just like any job would.
     
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  2. Suzanne

    Suzanne Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Depends on the type of employment. If cut throat, then be aware, because they may say they understand, but in reality, it could be just an excuse, to let off steam on vunerable ones.
     
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  3. MyLifeAsAnAspie

    MyLifeAsAnAspie Member

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    I agree with Suzanne that the effect of disclosure will vary greatly with the type of employment. I would hope that it would be a asset if you can show a strength for the type of employment. But I think this is still risky in most cases.

    So what field are you considering, Steve?
     
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  4. clg114

    clg114 Still crazy, after all these years. Staff Member V.I.P Member

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    No, never, absolutely not! They can not or will not understand.
     
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  5. Cactus

    Cactus Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I agree with not disclosing. It can potentially be a job terminating move, either by the employer, or yourself. If either happens, it can be devastating. Protect yourself.
     
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  6. Alexej

    Alexej Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    You might want to suss out the environment before disclosing - it might go either way for you
     
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  7. Aspychata

    Aspychata Serenity waves, beachy vibes

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    Crap shoot but chances are you won't like the reception. It's better to find your talent and go from there. People can be extremely cut-throat especially when you seem to perform and maybe stand out. I have shown people things they didn't know about their software, come up with ways to increase retail sales and l was not met warmly. I actually increased sales by what l did.
     
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  8. Steve A

    Steve A Active Member

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    I plan on working in the sports/fitness related field, specifically working for a sports team/athletic department type of job, professional or college level.

    I also wonder about the Americans with Disabilities Act that protects individuals from being discriminated within the workplace?

    On an extra note, I wish that more people were understanding about autism, especially when we have to deal with working for a majority of our lives, on top of dealing with autism.
     
  9. Magna

    Magna Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    People should not discriminate against applicants based on disabilities just as people shouldn't discriminate against people in non-work life. However, reality often runs counter to how things "should" work. It's possible if you do disclose your diagnosis during pre-employment interviews, etc that you wouldn't be selected. It's very hard for people to prove that they've been passed over (discriminated against) for a job.

    Employers often interview many applicants. The differences in qualifications between applicants can be vast, or they can be similar with little variance. However, the little variances can be enough for an employer to justify their decision to hire one applicant over another.

    I disclosed to my employer over a year after I was hired. I did this for two reasons: 1) I was in the process of being assessed for autism at the same time I was applying for a job so I started the application process before knowing I was autistic. 2) I presented my employer with a request letter for reasonable accommodation under the ADA to work from home on a permanent basis. My employer complied with my request.

    I wish you the best in your job searches.