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Difficulty understanding stimming

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by Tallen01, Nov 30, 2021.

  1. Tallen01

    Tallen01 New Member

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    Can someone explain to me what constitutes something as stimming or a repetitive behavior? I understand the stereotypical hand flapping, verbalizations etc. But I’m curious about the more nuanced forms that higher functioning individuals might engage in including durations/frequency. Please don’t judge me for my “stims”. I frequently will rub my fingers where my nose meets my face and smell my fingers. I do this repeatedly and I’m not sure why. My wife hates it lol. I also love running my sheet through my fingers when I’m in bed. I love the feeling of it when it’s cold. I’ll do this for sometimes 20 minutes at a time. I’m assuming these would be considered self stimulatory behaviors. I am diagnosed by the way but I do question my diagnosis.
     
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  2. Neonatal RRT

    Neonatal RRT Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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  3. Gift2humanity

    Gift2humanity Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I rock back and forth, from side to side, or round and round. It calms me down. It used to drive my mum mad as autism was understood back then and she thought I looked like a dada.
     
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  4. Streetwise

    Streetwise Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Read o.c.d behaviours and self stimulation(stim,stimming) behaviours to know specifically which are autism,it will probably be tailored to you personally
     
  5. Tallen01

    Tallen01 New Member

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    ah thank you. That was an informative read. I would definitely say my repetitive behaviors that I engage in now are more in line with ASD rather than OCD because I do find enjoyment in them and they are relaxing. However, as a child I had an obsession with the number five and then it was three and I would count to three repetitively and do “stim” behaviors in threes perhaps that was more of an OCD thing.
     
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  6. Tom

    Tom Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Not sure there is actually concensus on what is 'officially' considered Stimming.

    I take a broad view and think in terms of any repetitive behavior. I also think NTs do it as well as ASD folks.

    I have a somewhat similar bedtime ritual making repetitive motions with my hands.
     
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  7. Aspychata

    Aspychata Serenity waves, beachy vibes V.I.P Member

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    I just bought those spinners. Maybe for gifts? Sometimes obsessively concentrating on something when l am bored helps me. It seems l can have a low threshold for boredom, that can outweigh a lot of my other issues. I always want to think, watch, read, play solitare, race video cars, cook - whatever. And then l found my zen.

    I agree with @Yeshuasdaughter
    I love to spin.
     
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  8. MyLifeAsAnAspie

    MyLifeAsAnAspie Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    What's a "dada" :confused:
     
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  9. zurb

    zurb Eschewer of Obfuscation

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  10. Streetwise

    Streetwise Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Realise that anxiety has probably been with since the uterus ,unless you were blessed to be barely anxious ,think of what you did ,if you were anxious ,another common diagnosis is a.d.h.d, picking is one of the symptoms,yes welcome to the world of the not fun comorbidities(health conditions that aren't your neurological state !autism),a.s.d is a neurotypical (largest percentage neurology worldwide)title ,because we aren't little Neurotypicals ,they can't stand that,rarely will a n.t.(neurotypical)learn your method of communicating,but we must!!! learn theirs I was diagnosed 6 years ago later in life ,so im slightly ahead of you, in what I've crammed in my very full head.
     
  11. Gift2humanity

    Gift2humanity Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    A politically incorrect word for someone who rocks back-and-forth, for example, in a mental institution, handicapped in some way.
    In the 70's and 80's we used to say Duh! to anyone who said anything daft and call them politically incorrect names like sp4z :(